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Old 06-17-2017, 07:45 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
13,420 posts, read 16,962,854 times
Reputation: 9513

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Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I'm literally an hour and a half from Atlanta, hit I-20, straight shot then I'm in the city, that's nothing. I grew up in NYC, and moved to Miami; I've been to every region East of San Antonio. I've recently just visited Toronto for the first time a few months ago and plan on going back for Caribana to meet up with a couple of friends. I grew up in a very diverse family, we're all over.

Point is, you're seriously going to tell that housing developments and neighborhoods such as...

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5039...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5146...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5016...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.4958...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5018...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5029...7i13312!8i6656

Are common throughout the Southeast? even though those neighborhoods and housing developments were built by developers outside of the Southeast? I have not seen one neighborhood in Atlanta or the Southeast, that's similar. I keep asking for examples of said similar housing developments, and of course, you've yet to find any. You'd think that someone from Atlanta would have no problem finding an example.
Dude ... just quit already! There are buildings like that in abundance THROUGHOUT the City of Atlanta and it's historic streetcar suburbs. If you say you've been to Atlanta and "not seen one neighborhood" like those you've linked above, then you've obviously only driven through Atlanta on an interstate ... or you are lying.

It is not the job of anyone here to prove anything to you. If you're really so impassioned about this topic, then get in a car, come to Atlanta and drive around Midtown, Ansley, Morningside, Virginia-Highland, Boulevard, The Old 4th Ward, Grant Park and Ormewood and see just how absolutely 100 percent WRONG you are. Otherwise, you obviously don't have a clue about Atlanta's historic neighborhoods and have zero authority to speak on this subject.
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Old 06-18-2017, 12:01 AM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,144 posts, read 1,521,186 times
Reputation: 1848
Quote:
Originally Posted by 80s_kid View Post
_OT, I never knew Birmingham had architecture like that, props. I'm a native Atlantan and I see the point that you're making. To me, Birmingham isn't really "Old South" in the Savannah/Charleston sense but it isn't New South like Charlotte, ATL, or Tampa...not sure what term to use for it.
I never knew either until I actually moved and transferred up here a few years ago. This is pretty much all based on the history of Birmingham, and the amount of influences other Midwestern/Northeastern cities has had on Birmingham's architecture, layout, and housing diversity since the 1890's.

The West Side of Birmingham looked very similar to neighborhoods on the East Side of Detroit, and went through similar decline patterns as well.

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3656...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5076...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3654...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5043...7i13312!8i6656

Just like you said though, Birmingham really isn't "Old South" in the sense of Savannah/Charleston, and it really isn't "New South" in way that it easily compares to Charlotte, ATL, or Tampa. I think the best clarification for Birmingham is just Rust Belt honestly. At the end of the day, it's still a Southeastern City due to it's geographical location, but to quote what a previous poster stated, "Cities are influenced by the times that shaped or continue to shape them."
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Old 06-18-2017, 01:24 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C. By way of Texas
18,633 posts, read 27,064,736 times
Reputation: 9577
Quote:
Gulf Coast: Mobile. Yes, Mobile. Mardi Gras started here, not Mobile. It's the only city of any substantial size in the U.S. that fully embraces the Gulf of Mexico, has built its economy based on it, and yet still retains a strong regional identity by not becoming cosmopolitan or transient. Tampa-St. Petersburg, Naples, Ft. Myers, and South Padre are transient, but certainly not cosmopolitan; Houston and New Orleans are both cosmopolitan and transient, but they're also just in the Gulf region and not on the actual GofM itself. Honorable mentions: Pensacola, Biloxi, Gulfport, Galveston
I can understand the usage of Mobile over the others because of its lack of cosmopolitan and transient criteria. The distance thing confuses me tho. Mobile isn't exactly right smack dab on the Gulf either. It's on the Bay. Just like Houston touches Galveston Bay. Just like Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay is a major catalyst to Houstons economy.
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Old 06-18-2017, 07:28 AM
 
Location: St Simons Island, GA
23,085 posts, read 35,035,900 times
Reputation: 15256
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Dude ... just quit already! There are buildings like that in abundance THROUGHOUT the City of Atlanta and it's historic streetcar suburbs. If you say you've been to Atlanta and "not seen one neighborhood" like those you've linked above, then you've obviously only driven through Atlanta on an interstate ... or you are lying.

It is not the job of anyone here to prove anything to you. If you're really so impassioned about this topic, then get in a car, come to Atlanta and drive around Midtown, Ansley, Morningside, Virginia-Highland, Boulevard, The Old 4th Ward, Grant Park and Ormewood and see just how absolutely 100 percent WRONG you are. Otherwise, you obviously don't have a clue about Atlanta's historic neighborhoods and have zero authority to speak on this subject.
Well said, Newsboy, but as we know posting from a position of willful ignorance is nothing new to this forum.
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Old 06-18-2017, 07:44 AM
 
8 posts, read 4,043 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I can understand the usage of Mobile over the others because of its lack of cosmopolitan and transient criteria. The distance thing confuses me tho. Mobile isn't exactly right smack dab on the Gulf either. It's on the Bay. Just like Houston touches Galveston Bay. Just like Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay is a major catalyst to Houstons economy.
Doesn't Mobile's city limits actually touch the bay though? There's a couple of suburb cities between Houston and Galveston Bay. The major difference is that downtown mobile sits near a body of water, so that sways people's viewpoint.

Edit: Why are Atlanta posters so damn insecure?
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Old 06-18-2017, 10:16 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18517
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreChunes View Post
Edit: Why are Atlanta posters so damn insecure?
How are Atlanta posters being "insecure," newbie?
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Old 06-18-2017, 10:47 AM
 
Location: New Orleans
797 posts, read 1,159,639 times
Reputation: 631
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
I'm literally an hour and a half from Atlanta, hit I-20, straight shot then I'm in the city, that's nothing. I grew up in NYC, and moved to Miami; I've been to every region East of San Antonio. I've recently just visited Toronto for the first time a few months ago and plan on going back for Caribana to meet up with a couple of friends. I grew up in a very diverse family, we're all over.

Point is, you're seriously going to tell that housing developments and neighborhoods such as...

https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5039...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5146...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5016...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.4958...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5018...7i13312!8i6656
https://www.google.com/maps/@33.5029...7i13312!8i6656

Are common throughout the Southeast? even though those neighborhoods and housing developments were built by developers outside of the Southeast? I have not seen one neighborhood in Atlanta or the Southeast, that's similar. I keep asking for examples of said similar housing developments, and of course, you've yet to find any. You'd think that someone from Atlanta would have no problem finding an example.
Here are your Google streetviews.

Atlanta
https://goo.gl/maps/m9YvDVu85gz
https://goo.gl/maps/w4ppvNT6Wbk
https://goo.gl/maps/nE9aSG9qdfo
https://goo.gl/maps/tVjEv9kjU3y
https://goo.gl/maps/KKqrUQF9peM2
https://goo.gl/maps/ighxUewAn2H2
https://goo.gl/maps/tytwhwENkSJ2
https://goo.gl/maps/4LCfwz6zQuj

Jacksonville
https://goo.gl/maps/h4fNRfujzFy
https://goo.gl/maps/eA8WQs4U4Uk
https://goo.gl/maps/nppk4DDGa7m
https://goo.gl/maps/aYmcT9Z5kuT2
https://goo.gl/maps/E7QoAcb6a3Q2
https://goo.gl/maps/DhWPVVvpw1G2

Memphis
https://goo.gl/maps/SG2MHL8ibAw
https://goo.gl/maps/tCWWsVbyZAv
https://goo.gl/maps/JVypnZPwhg12
https://goo.gl/maps/kXj46x1d3mL2
https://goo.gl/maps/b9zQM6kGxcq

All pretty similar. Any city of some historic value is going to have some unique architecture and identity, even there own vernacular style. But brick 1910s/1920s apartment buildings and such can be found in just about any city that grew during that era. I could keep going, similar structures can be found in Louisville, Richmond, New Orleans, and probably a few more southern cities. There will be differences, no two cities are alike and no two buildings are totally alike but the general look can be found in any older city.

Also such buildings are pretty easy to find using google maps. Just go to any 1910s/1920s streetcar suburb neighborhood of a city and look for the boxy buildings from the aerial map. They are quite common in Atlanta, slightly less so in Jacksonville, and less so in Memphis but all still there.
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:23 AM
 
8 posts, read 4,043 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimbo_1 View Post
Here are your Google streetviews.

Atlanta
https://goo.gl/maps/m9YvDVu85gz
https://goo.gl/maps/w4ppvNT6Wbk
https://goo.gl/maps/nE9aSG9qdfo
https://goo.gl/maps/tVjEv9kjU3y
https://goo.gl/maps/KKqrUQF9peM2
https://goo.gl/maps/ighxUewAn2H2
https://goo.gl/maps/tytwhwENkSJ2
https://goo.gl/maps/4LCfwz6zQuj

Jacksonville
https://goo.gl/maps/h4fNRfujzFy
https://goo.gl/maps/eA8WQs4U4Uk
https://goo.gl/maps/nppk4DDGa7m
https://goo.gl/maps/aYmcT9Z5kuT2
https://goo.gl/maps/E7QoAcb6a3Q2
https://goo.gl/maps/DhWPVVvpw1G2

Memphis
https://goo.gl/maps/SG2MHL8ibAw
https://goo.gl/maps/tCWWsVbyZAv
https://goo.gl/maps/JVypnZPwhg12
https://goo.gl/maps/kXj46x1d3mL2
https://goo.gl/maps/b9zQM6kGxcq

All pretty similar. Any city of some historic value is going to have some unique architecture and identity, even there own vernacular style. But brick 1910s/1920s apartment buildings and such can be found in just about any city that grew during that era. I could keep going, similar structures can be found in Louisville, Richmond, New Orleans, and probably a few more southern cities. There will be differences, no two cities are alike and no two buildings are totally alike but the general look can be found in any older city.

Also such buildings are pretty easy to find using google maps. Just go to any 1910s/1920s streetcar suburb neighborhood of a city and look for the boxy buildings from the aerial map. They are quite common in Atlanta, slightly less so in Jacksonville, and less so in Memphis but all still there.
None of these links looked good tbh
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:28 AM
 
29,944 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18517
Quote:
Originally Posted by MoreChunes View Post
None of these links looked good tbh
LOL...that wasn't the point and those neighborhoods look perfectly fine to me. But nice troll job so far.
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Old 06-18-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Mobile,Al(the city by the bay)
3,792 posts, read 6,524,573 times
Reputation: 1544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spade View Post
I can understand the usage of Mobile over the others because of its lack of cosmopolitan and transient criteria. The distance thing confuses me tho. Mobile isn't exactly right smack dab on the Gulf either. It's on the Bay. Just like Houston touches Galveston Bay. Just like Mobile Bay, Galveston Bay is a major catalyst to Houstons economy.
I believe the slight difference between Mobile and Houston is that Mobile County is actually Gulf coastal and you can see the Gulf from downtown Mobile or the bay way. The southern most part of the city is less than 20 miles from the Gulf.
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