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Old 06-12-2017, 03:06 AM
 
100 posts, read 62,775 times
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What's the deal with Great Lakes cities like Buffalo and Detroit ? I think I've read that the Downtown area of Detroit is going through a renaissance , but the city as a whole doesn't seem to be thriving . Buffalo seems to be the same way from afar at any rate .
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Old 06-12-2017, 03:36 AM
 
56,692 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
What's the deal with Great Lakes cities like Buffalo and Detroit ? I think I've read that the Downtown area of Detroit is going through a renaissance , but the city as a whole doesn't seem to be thriving . Buffalo seems to be the same way from afar at any rate .
Buffalo has some in demand neighborhoods in the city(pretty much west of Main Street to about Richmond Ave.), but it also has areas like its West Side that are revitalizing and some efforts are being made select parts of the East Side as well. Parts of South Buffalo are solid to quite nice as well.
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Old 06-12-2017, 05:47 AM
 
21,202 posts, read 30,404,475 times
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Baltimore, Pittsburgh, St. Louis. I don't know if Sunbelt cities count since they generally are building from scratch.
All three have seen a good bit thanks to their largely untouched architecture.
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Old 06-12-2017, 05:48 AM
 
Location: Heart of Dixie
712 posts, read 399,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
What's the deal with Great Lakes cities like Buffalo and Detroit ? I think I've read that the Downtown area of Detroit is going through a renaissance , but the city as a whole doesn't seem to be thriving . Buffalo seems to be the same way from afar at any rate .
The East side of Buffalo is in freefall, but the rest of the city has experienced substantial gains in income, housing prices, and in some cases even population.
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Old 06-12-2017, 06:08 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
1,221 posts, read 1,732,822 times
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Originally Posted by NigerianNightmare View Post
San Antonio- I think the bad areas and the good areas have stayed the same for most of it's history.

Personally the easiest way to find a city without gentrification is too find a city were the crime stats from the 90's till now has either barely dropped (accounting for population), or slightly increased. I'm not sure it is possible to find many major cities were this is true though.
Nope.... Forbes had an article last year about San Antonio being a new hot spot for millenials. One draw was while it was cheaper than Austin there is a revitalization going on in the urban core. The Pearl area and the Can Plant for loft living and trendy restaurants, boutiques, farmers markets. The King William area has been gentrified for years but Southtown is relatively new. Lavaca, South Flores, Tobin Hill and now Dignowty Hill on the East Side is the new area.
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Old 06-12-2017, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,439 posts, read 11,941,006 times
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Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
All three have seen a good bit thanks to their largely untouched architecture.
Pittsburgh is definitely gentrifying, although the story is more complicated here in some ways. First, because there were a lot of neighborhoods which always stayed relatively middle class and desirable, meaning they didn't so much gentrify as they never went downhill, and the type of middle-class person living there changed. Second, because most of the gentrification which has happened has been in working-class white neighborhoods, which isn't how the dynamic is typically discussed nationwide.
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Old 06-12-2017, 09:22 AM
 
56,692 posts, read 80,995,527 times
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Originally Posted by cjoseph View Post
The East side of Buffalo is in freefall, but the rest of the city has experienced substantial gains in income, housing prices, and in some cases even population.
It looks like around Bailey in the NE corner of the city is seeing some interest in terms of investment and Hamlin Park is still pretty solid, with some interest as well. https://www.buffalorising.com/tags/bailey-avenue/

https://www.buffalorising.com/tags/h...tress-factory/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.buf...nsidering/amp/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.buf...-for-900k/amp/
https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.buf...t-delavan/amp/

There appears to be a Heritage Corridor emerging around Michigan Avenue as well: https://www.michiganstreetbuffalo.org

With this said more could be done on that side of town(I.e.- Broadway Market area, the Central Terminal, just east of Main Street and along other main streets).
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Old 06-12-2017, 09:37 AM
 
1,586 posts, read 1,543,398 times
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Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I'm not sure about New Orleans. Certainly the city has seen an amazing comeback after Katrina and a lot of rebuilding has happened but I'm not sure if that counts as true gentrification. The city unfortunately still has many of the same challenges it faced before the storm. The Ninth Ward is still a bad area.
When you say "Ninth Ward" you probably mean "Lower Ninth Ward," but ironically enough, the New Orleans neighborhood probably most associated with recent gentrification, the Bywater, is also in the Ninth Ward -- the Upper Ninth Ward. So not only has gentrification happened in New Orleans, it's happened in exactly the area you cited.

A few years ago, I heard someone say this about the Lower Ninth Ward: "It's not really a high-crime area. It's not really a high-anything area."
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Old 06-12-2017, 01:51 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,889,393 times
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Originally Posted by KodeBlue View Post
Baltimore, Pittsburgh, St. Louis. I don't know if Sunbelt cities count since they generally are building from scratch.
They're not built from scratch...and none for Baltimore? Baltimore has done a good job of preserving old buildings and repurposing them, rather than tearing them down and building bland luxury condos in its place, but it's still gentrification. You wouldnt call the Fleet St/Boston St corridor gentrifying?
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Old 06-12-2017, 05:31 PM
 
1,496 posts, read 1,519,785 times
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Depending on if you would limit gentrification to the downtown areas, I would say Atlanta. While many in-town neighborhoods like Lindbergh, Buckhead (all though its always been nice), Midtown, etc. are seeing gentrification, downtown really isn't.
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