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Old 03-10-2008, 01:23 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
Reputation: 13287

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Here is the map of the US displaying "frontier" counties.

U.S. Frontier Counties 2000 Consensus

Here is the map displaying the economic dependencies of those frontier counties:
Economic Dependence (Frontier counties - 48 states)

Who on the forum lives in a frontier county or has lived in one in the past? Say what county it was and share your personal experiences about the positives and negatives about living there.

In the Great Plains the frontier is expanding again with many counties having fewer than 7 people per square mile, and younger people leaving in droves to urban areas. Kansas now has more frontier counties now then in 1900.

Last edited by GraniteStater; 03-10-2008 at 01:34 PM..
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Old 03-10-2008, 01:44 PM
 
362 posts, read 1,631,897 times
Reputation: 242
I used to live in Fremont County, Wyoming.

Positives:
BEAUTIFUL scenery
slow-paced
very friendly
lots of outdoor activities

Negatives:
Supposedly lots of crime and drugs due to Wind River Reservation (just what I've heard!)
very isolated
very cold in winter, can get quite hot in the summer
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:01 PM
 
Location: Jamestown, ND
20 posts, read 81,747 times
Reputation: 18
I currently live in Barnes County, North Dakota and will be moving to Stutsman County, North Dakota (They border each other in eastern ND).

Positives-
-low population, not crowded at all...nearest neighbors are ~1 mile or so away
-nice scenery
-very safe
-friendly people
-less hectic than a city, not nearly as busy
-big yard, open spaces, wildlife

Negatives-
-Winter can be cold, snow can make the roads impassible, and it may take awhile before you can get out (Even though that hasn't happened in quite awhile)
-Small towns, less options (Example-the nearest Walmart is 40 miles away)
-Small school (this can be a good thing, but can also be a bad thing because of less options for classes, activities, etc. My graduating class had 22 in it.)
-we have to drive about 85 miles to Fargo to do any decent shopping, dining, etc

I don't mind living out here at all. We have everything we need (internet, cable, etc. and contrary to what some may think, yes we do have running water and electricity in ND...you'd be amazed at how many people actually ask those questions!). It's a great place to live in my experience. I did live in a larger city (metro area 150,000+) for college, and that has its benefits too.

Last edited by DakotaKid1982; 03-10-2008 at 02:02 PM.. Reason: corrected a misspelling
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:06 PM
 
Location: The Rock!
2,370 posts, read 6,995,779 times
Reputation: 804
Quote:
Originally Posted by Plains10 View Post
Here is the map of the US displaying "frontier" counties.

U.S. Frontier Counties 2000 Consensus

Here is the map displaying the economic dependencies of those frontier counties:
Economic Dependence (Frontier counties - 48 states)

Who on the forum lives in a frontier county or has lived in one in the past? Say what county it was and share your personal experiences about the positives and negatives about living there.

In the Great Plains the frontier is expanding again with many counties having fewer than 7 people per square mile, and younger people leaving in droves to urban areas. Kansas now has more frontier counties now then in 1900.

Is that the criterion for being a frontier county? I'd never heard of this before.
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:06 PM
 
Location: West Michigan
12,084 posts, read 34,155,973 times
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Looks like I live in one right now. Aroostook County, Maine.

Positives:
Nice country side
No traffic
Can be very friendly
good hunting
Clean air



Negatives:
Long drive to get anyplace
Closest town over 15,000 is 3 1/2 hour drive one way
closest town over 50,000 is 6 1/2 hour drive one way
LONG winters here
Rest of the State kind of forgets about us.
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:09 PM
 
Location: 3219'03.7"N 10643'55.9"W
8,114 posts, read 17,323,570 times
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I lived in Otero County New Mexico for 6 months. I'm having a hard time though assimilating the classification of this county being 'frontier'. By definition, I thought the frontier, as defined by the census, translated into less than 6 people per square mile. Alamogordo is contained by Otero County, which is home to 35,000 people. Lowes, Home Depot, Applebees, etc. I will grant you the remainder of the county (except for possibly Tularosa) might be construed as 'frontier', but that's only because so much of the county is occupied by either Holloman AFB or Fort Bliss. When I think of 'frontier', I associate this with other counties in New Mexico (Catron and Hidalgo come to mind, and are on the map as being such) but don't quite understand the inclusion of Otero County. It's certainly the most rural place I've ever lived, but not quite on the level population density wise of other places I've visited.
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:30 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stormcrow73 View Post
Is that the criterion for being a frontier county? I'd never heard of this before.
A disagreement does exist. Some sources say under 7 people per square mile while others will say 6 or fewer people per square mile. The difference is generally only 1 per square mile. Population density is not the only thing that is calculated when determining a frontier county. Many different charactersitics go into a big formula.
Here is the formula:

Frontier: A New Definition
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:51 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
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"frontier" County Courthouses in NW Kansas





Source: Blue Skyways - a service of the Kansas State Library
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Orange, California
1,573 posts, read 5,650,182 times
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I tell you though...ever since the internet, frontier living ain't what it used to be. The fact is, you can now live in the middle of nowhere Alaska (for instance) and still have instant access to all the news and shopping that you could possibly hope for. Sure it may take a little longer for your Amazon.com delivery to arrive. Perhaps you have to go and pick it up yourself from the post office. But you are still wired into the grid in a way that people living in "frontier" areas never could have imagined 30 years ago.
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Old 03-10-2008, 02:59 PM
 
Location: IN
20,846 posts, read 35,942,861 times
Reputation: 13287
Quote:
Originally Posted by goozer View Post
I tell you though...ever since the internet, frontier living ain't what it used to be. The fact is, you can now live in the middle of nowhere Alaska (for instance) and still have instant access to all the news and shopping that you could possibly hope for. Sure it may take a little longer for your Amazon.com delivery to arrive. Perhaps you have to go and pick it up yourself from the post office. But you are still wired into the grid in a way that people living in "frontier" areas never could have imagined 30 years ago.
The issue at stake is that some frontier areas are more desirable to live in compared with the frontier areas of the Great Plains for most people. Many rural frontier counties in the Great Plains have high speed internet, cable, etc but can not convince most of the younger people to stay. Therefore, the only way growth occurs in the rural Great Plains is if the economy becomes very strong or in energy boom is occuring. An example of some areas that are currently experiencing an energy boom would be WY, ND, and MT. Campbell County WY is an example of an energy boom county.
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