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Old 06-15-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WizardOfRadical View Post

California is just so much more amazing than where everywhere else is.
This is called being "California humble".
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Old 06-15-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
This is called being "California humble".
Having grown up on the East Coast, I find the whole Cali bragging really ****ing weird. People in the Northeast might be scared of and/or find strange essentially the entire rest of the country, but they don't go around talking about how awesome where they're from is. Indeed, they're more likely to complain about it all the time.
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Old 06-15-2017, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Of course. I find suburban culture across the country much much more homogenous and similar than rural culture. You got the rural deep South which is different from rural Appalachia which is different from rural Great Plains, which is different form rural New England, different from rural Upper Midwest, rural Rockies, etc. etc. etc.

The South and lower Midwest are just more evangelical than the rest of the country. In the far north, religion is more a private thing. A lot of "blue states" are actually pretty religious, even in the cities, but the mindsets from the religious people is very different.
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Old 06-15-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,160,832 times
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Rural Southerns get a bad rap for being racist but most of them I have met are kind welcoming good people although they are not the most educated they are overall hard working down to earth people. Rural Northeastern residents keep more to themselves and are a bit more socially liberal.
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Old 06-15-2017, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Mid-Atlantic
24,974 posts, read 23,882,175 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Anyone who claims that the main cultural divide in the U.S. is between urban and rural is an idiot who hasn't traveled much.

Of course differences in rural areas fall on a spectrum, and there aren't clear divides. The rural South, for example, slowly fades into the Midwest. But to give two extremes on the scale, rural Vermont and rural Mississippi are about as far apart as two different parts of the country can be culturally speaking.

This is before even going into the different rural subcultures which aren't "generic American," like the black belt, native Americans, rural Latino areas, Amish, etc.
You sound like the idiot to me. I'm not attacking. There are many in the NE who are trying to stay away from...whatever the mess is now called.
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Old 06-15-2017, 05:07 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Newsboy View Post
Rural areas of the south have lots of African-Americans. You will not find that anywhere else in the country.

CLOSE THREAD

Yes, thats a big factor but there's a lot more to it. For example, in California, people don't associate Mexicans with "rural" unless they're migrant workers picking strawberries, but in Texas, a lot of Mexican-Americans are just as into the country lifestyle as anyone else. Ain't uncommon to find a Mexican-American who speaks with a southern accent, wears cowboy boots and hats and maybe even owns a ranch. There's so many different dynamics to rural America.
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Old 06-15-2017, 05:30 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,528 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Yes, thats a big factor but there's a lot more to it. For example, in California, people don't associate Mexicans with "rural" unless they're migrant workers picking strawberries, but in Texas, a lot of Mexican-Americans are just as into the country lifestyle as anyone else. Ain't uncommon to find a Mexican-American who speaks with a southern accent, wears cowboy boots and hats and maybe even owns a ranch. There's so many different dynamics to rural America.

Does this also apply to say African Americans who live in the Black Belt ? Of course I realize that the cowboy culture elements probably aren't present , but what is rural African American culture like these days ? Has it changed a lot since the Great Migration or has it remained essentially the same ?
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Old 06-15-2017, 05:33 PM
 
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Rural New Mexico seems a bit different from rural Pennsylvania.

Socially rural PA areas differ from each other but generally socially (and increasingly more uniformly politically) conservative. The Quaker-ish rural areas (now mostly exurban Philadelphia) were distinct from the east-central and south-central PA German areas which differed from the southwestern Scots-Irish (though areas long Germanized still have township names like Derry and Armagh) which differed from the third sons of New England descended regions in the far Northern Tier. The coal mining heritage areas differed too, especially the anthracite region (Schuylkill County and adjacent portions of most neighboring) and the Connellsville coke (western Fayette, southern Westmoreland counties).

One way to discern social boundaries in rural America is to identify the denomination of the little country churches in the area. If United Methodist or UCC, one might need to dig a little deeper (was it United Brethren or Methodist Episcopal? Congregational or Evangelical Reformed?), and certainly not all Baptists are created equal.
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Old 06-15-2017, 05:36 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,528 times
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I also want to bring up the subject of homogenization as well . That is the topic of whether rural culture in the USA is starting to become standardized or not . For example I've heard that there are people in Pennsylvania and New York state that display Confederate flags on their front porches , which leads to the question of whether rural culture in the USA is becoming Southernized or not .

I realize this might be a bit of a silly example , but it's a fact that certain cultural symbols and forms that are heavily associated with the South can be found throughout the country . I mean I bet that every state has a country music station , in spite of that genre being a Southern ( and to some extent ) Western invention .
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Old 06-15-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,059 posts, read 3,379,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
Does this also apply to say African Americans who live in the Black Belt ? Of course I realize that the cowboy culture elements probably aren't present , but what is rural African American culture like these days ? Has it changed a lot since the Great Migration or has it remained essentially the same ?
Not that different from the white population. Rural black southerners are just as religious as rural white southerners, as well. There's black farmers just as there's white ones, too.
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