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Old 06-27-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,579 posts, read 17,561,360 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
^ This is basically what I am saying...yes the amenities as far as proximity to entertainment can be nice (especially professional sports/concerts), but realistically, how many of these types of events do you go to a year? Myself, even when in the city maybe went to 1 concert and a couple baseball/hockey games; 3-5 events per year...Now I'm sure others go more often, and I suspect quite a few go even less. So is this really a reason to choose a place to live, just so you can avoid a 30-45 minute drive to see a concert/game every few months? Now, living in the burbs, I've already been to 3 concerts just this summer, because it only takes around 25 minutes to get there, and the parking is plentiful and easy. Not to mention the atmosphere on an outdoor lawn concert in the summertime beats an indoor amphitheater any day of the week in my opinion..
I'd probably go to at least two dozen events, even if it was just a casual basketball or baseball game after work, but it really wasn't a problem to drive downtown.
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Old 06-27-2017, 12:58 PM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,517,357 times
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Living in a city has enormous benefits. It's not about having to avoid a 30 minute drive to get to that concert or sporting event. I'm 27 and truly love living in a city. I have all my life. I grew up in a suburb, but on my own have only lived in cities. I've lived in 5 different places now and have only owned a car in one of them. I don't get what the OP says about being stranded to just the Downtown area if you choose to go without a car. It's like that in many sprawled out cities in America, such as Charlotte, which the OP has experience in. But then there also just as many cities where you don't need a car to access a variety of neighborhoods.

I take full advantage of living in cities. Nightlife, sports, concerts, museums, great food, etc. These aren't things I do every now and then, but all the time. I don't think being in a relationship even factors into this. I also do not like to drive, and will live car free whenever possible. And if I ever own property, it won't be in the suburbs.

City living has great benefits if you are that kind of person, and not just something to do because it's cool.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:09 PM
 
60 posts, read 49,837 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Living in a city has enormous benefits. It's not about having to avoid a 30 minute drive to get to that concert or sporting event. I'm 27 and truly love living in a city. I have all my life. I grew up in a suburb, but on my own have only lived in cities. I've lived in 5 different places now and have only owned a car in one of them. I don't get what the OP says about being stranded to just the Downtown area if you choose to go without a car. It's like that in many sprawled out cities in America, such as Charlotte, which the OP has experience in. But then there also just as many cities where you don't need a car to access a variety of neighborhoods.

I take full advantage of living in cities. Nightlife, sports, concerts, museums, great food, etc. These aren't things I do every now and then, but all the time. I don't think being in a relationship even factors into this. I also do not like to drive, and will live car free whenever possible. And if I ever own property, it won't be in the suburbs.

City living has great benefits if you are that kind of person, and not just something to do because it's cool.
To all these people with this attitude, I'm just curious, did you always have a solid group of friends in these cities to hang out with and do these activities? I imagine this would be a huge factor in how much people enjoy it, but like the poster above who have been in 5 different cities in the span of (assuming) ~8-10 years how are you even able to build and maintain REAL friendships that quickly, or do you just do a lot of these 'activities' alone? For reference, I've been friends with a pretty constant/tight-knit group of people for roughly the past decade. Maybe in bigger cities this is different, but from my experience a lot of people already have their 'groups' solidified by their early 20's.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:25 PM
 
2,508 posts, read 2,270,777 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
To all these people with this attitude, I'm just curious, did you always have a solid group of friends in these cities to hang out with and do these activities? I imagine this would be a huge factor in how much people enjoy it, but like the poster above who have been in 5 different cities in the span of (assuming) ~8-10 years how are you even able to build and maintain REAL friendships that quickly, or do you just do a lot of these 'activities' alone? For reference, I've been friends with a pretty constant/tight-knit group of people for roughly the past decade. Maybe in bigger cities this is different, but from my experience a lot of people already have their 'groups' solidified by their early 20's.
I grew up in the DC area, lived in Chicago, NYC, Atlanta, SF.

DC - childhood friends
Chicago -2yrs- I didn't know anyone when I moved there. Was easy to make friends.
NYC -3yrs- Knew a small handful of folks because of DC childhood but was the easiest to make friends of all of the places I lived in.
SF -4yrs- I didn't know anyone besides an acquaintance or two but also found it easy to make friends.
Atlanta -1.5yr- I have one cousin there but it was also easy find a good group of friends.

I'm still good friends with alot of people from each of those cities... we travel together and visit here and there and frequently keep in touch. Next week I have 2 friends from SF coming to visit and we are going to NYC for the weekend and will meet up with all of our mutual friends. These are "Real" friends as you put it. Alot of my friends from these different cities have become friends with each other overtime since we like to travel and attend events together. I find it easier to mingle with folks in cities since the culture pretty much pushes you into situations with lots of different people so unless you are an introvert yourself, it's hard to not meet people. In the suburbs, you tend to make plans and go sit somewhere or do activities that are insular to the group you are with from my experience.
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
374 posts, read 345,907 times
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If you live in an apartment with amenity spaces or in row houses that are close together it's easier to get to know your neighbors. In Baltimore a lot of the gentrified neighborhoods have strong social media groups - I'm talking 10,000 to 20,000 people per group. People will joke, report crimes, share info, etc. on community social media pages and then run into people on the street, bar, restaurant, ballgame. A lot of downtown employers make networking essentially a mandatory part of one's job - this also plays a role. Happy hours, community festivals, etc. they all add up over time.

It's a completely different world from the suburbs.

I have friends that live in the suburbs who have largely solidified their friends circle. It doesn't surprise me because these are the folks that thought it was strange to talk to people they never met before at a house party. What? That's one of the main points going to a party in the first place - socializing. It's like they have some strange form of separation anxiety only its related to meeting new people? Hang out with people you know who hunt/wear camo regularly - often I hear people say something to the tune of "I don't like people". Well if that's the case then it makes sense to me why you wouldn't find living in a major city as being desirable.
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:06 PM
 
60 posts, read 49,837 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by TommyCarcetti View Post
If you live in an apartment with amenity spaces or in row houses that are close together it's easier to get to know your neighbors. In Baltimore a lot of the gentrified neighborhoods have strong social media groups - I'm talking 10,000 to 20,000 people per group. People will joke, report crimes, share info, etc. on community social media pages and then run into people on the street, bar, restaurant, ballgame. A lot of downtown employers make networking essentially a mandatory part of one's job - this also plays a role. Happy hours, community festivals, etc. they all add up over time.

It's a completely different world from the suburbs.

I have friends that live in the suburbs who have largely solidified their friends circle. It doesn't surprise me because these are the folks that thought it was strange to talk to people they never met before at a house party. What? That's one of the main points going to a party in the first place - socializing. It's like they have some strange form of separation anxiety only its related to meeting new people? Hang out with people you know who hunt/wear camo regularly - often I hear people say something to the tune of "I don't like people". Well if that's the case then it makes sense to me why you wouldn't find living in a major city as being desirable.
I'm glad you mentioned this; it's probably a pretty large reason why I'm just not 'getting' the reasons these other folks are putting out there. My friend group and I are pretty conservative (socially/politically, etc.) and have always hung out with the same sorts of people, and see no real reason to 'branch out' and meet new people. While I can see the downsides to this, there is something to be said for the comfortability my friends and I have having known each other for 10, 12 years. There are just things we mutually understand, joke about, talk about etc. that I don't think would 'click' with someone I've only known for a year or so...if that makes sense. It sort of goes back to my original remark, of how 'city living' would only make sense if you don't already have a group of friends (i.e. you're in a new location for work, etc.).

P.S. What area of Baltimore? I was considering purchasing a house in Fed Hill a while back actually as an investment/rental opp, but the property taxes there are outrageous...
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, Maryland
374 posts, read 345,907 times
Reputation: 458
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm glad you mentioned this; it's probably a pretty large reason why I'm just not 'getting' the reasons these other folks are putting out there. My friend group and I are pretty conservative (socially/politically, etc.) and have always hung out with the same sorts of people, and see no real reason to 'branch out' and meet new people. While I can see the downsides to this, there is something to be said for the comfortability my friends and I have having known each other for 10, 12 years. There are just things we mutually understand, joke about, talk about etc. that I don't think would 'click' with someone I've only known for a year or so...if that makes sense. It sort of goes back to my original remark, of how 'city living' would only make sense if you don't already have a group of friends (i.e. you're in a new location for work, etc.).

P.S. What area of Baltimore? I was considering purchasing a house in Fed Hill a while back actually as an investment/rental opp, but the property taxes there are outrageous...
Canton & Fed are among the neighborhoods that have robust social media groups:

Canton Neighbors: (16,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php...2968&ref=br_rs

South Baltimore Neighbors: (10,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/38364287472/?ref=br_rs

Patterson Park Neighbors (10,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php...5336&ref=br_rs

Federal Hill Neighborhood Association: (5,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/FHNA21230/?ref=br_rs

Highlandtown Neighbors: (3,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/High...ors/?ref=br_rs

Fells Point Neighbors: (2,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1418...612/?ref=br_rs

Mt. Vernon Neighbors: (2,000+)

https://www.facebook.com/profile.php...2028&ref=br_rs

Regarding the property taxes - in many ways I think it's a moot point. Why? Let's say the city lowers property taxes dramatically over night - what happens? Everyone's property values will skyrocket - making it essentially a zero-sum game.

Why?

My $200,000 house where I'm paying roughly $2 per $100 of assessed value = $4,000 a year in property taxes.

Let's say the city cuts the rate in half.

I'm now paying $1 per $100 of assessed value, but because the property taxes were cut in half, my property value is now $400,000. In this scenario I'm still paying $4,000 a year in property taxes.

People can argue that the property value wouldn't skyrocket that high - but if that were the case then a city like Baltimore would suffer major budgetary challenges that would potentially impact city services and the municipal bond rating.

Who benefits from a property tax cut? People who already own their house and want to leave the city - they can sell their house at a tremendous profit and head for the burbs.

Who loses? The first time home-buyer who now has to qualify for a loan roughly twice as high. The first time home-buyer is what cities like Baltimore need to make a true comeback.

So yeah - the whole property tax argument is so baseless and poorly thought out imho. Not to mention that it's only a matter of time before the counties will be forced to raise their property taxes as their roads, schools, public building/infrastructure gets older and poverty climbs.

Call me crazy - I don't care because I know I'm right on this one.
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Old 06-27-2017, 02:55 PM
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11,386 posts, read 10,517,357 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
To all these people with this attitude, I'm just curious, did you always have a solid group of friends in these cities to hang out with and do these activities? I imagine this would be a huge factor in how much people enjoy it, but like the poster above who have been in 5 different cities in the span of (assuming) ~8-10 years how are you even able to build and maintain REAL friendships that quickly, or do you just do a lot of these 'activities' alone? For reference, I've been friends with a pretty constant/tight-knit group of people for roughly the past decade. Maybe in bigger cities this is different, but from my experience a lot of people already have their 'groups' solidified by their early 20's.
I've lived all over the world, but I've always been one to meet people easily. Not a problem here. In bigger cities what you describe is definitely not the norm. Not everyone has their same social circle from high school/college. Cities where that is the case is actually a turn off. In your bigger cities you will have transplants, people moving for work, etc.
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Old 06-27-2017, 03:01 PM
PDF
 
11,386 posts, read 10,517,357 times
Reputation: 6606
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm glad you mentioned this; it's probably a pretty large reason why I'm just not 'getting' the reasons these other folks are putting out there. My friend group and I are pretty conservative (socially/politically, etc.) and have always hung out with the same sorts of people, and see no real reason to 'branch out' and meet new people. While I can see the downsides to this, there is something to be said for the comfortability my friends and I have having known each other for 10, 12 years. There are just things we mutually understand, joke about, talk about etc. that I don't think would 'click' with someone I've only known for a year or so...if that makes sense. It sort of goes back to my original remark, of how 'city living' would only make sense if you don't already have a group of friends (i.e. you're in a new location for work, etc.).

P.S. What area of Baltimore? I was considering purchasing a house in Fed Hill a while back actually as an investment/rental opp, but the property taxes there are outrageous...
City living makes sense if you like living in a city. It's as simple as that. I don't get why you assume that those who like it have no friends/no relationship? You could be married and have a huge social circle and still love living in a city. I don't think a relationship or friends matters one bit in this case. City living is ultimately a preference that either you have or you don't.

You probably just aren't cut out for it if you have no interest in meeting new people, and don't mind driving to get food or to go to a bar/club. And that says more about your preference than anything else.
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Old 06-27-2017, 03:30 PM
 
913 posts, read 550,034 times
Reputation: 840
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm glad you mentioned this; it's probably a pretty large reason why I'm just not 'getting' the reasons these other folks are putting out there. My friend group and I are pretty conservative (socially/politically, etc.) and have always hung out with the same sorts of people, and see no real reason to 'branch out' and meet new people. While I can see the downsides to this, there is something to be said for the comfortability my friends and I have having known each other for 10, 12 years. There are just things we mutually understand, joke about, talk about etc. that I don't think would 'click' with someone I've only known for a year or so...if that makes sense. It sort of goes back to my original remark, of how 'city living' would only make sense if you don't already have a group of friends (i.e. you're in a new location for work, etc.).

P.S. What area of Baltimore? I was considering purchasing a house in Fed Hill a while back actually as an investment/rental opp, but the property taxes there are outrageous...
If you're in your mid to late twenties and you've known your friends for 10, 12 years then you're still hanging out with your high school buddies. Nothing wrong with that but there are plenty of curious people who aren't satisfied with just socializing with the people they grew up with and want to branch out and see what else is out there.

At this point your questions has been answered many times over and looks like you're just looking for validation for your own preferences by coming up with new ways to disparage people who made different choices. Sorry, you won't find it here.
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