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Old 06-20-2017, 02:57 PM
 
Location: Kent, UK/ Rhode Island, US
626 posts, read 575,577 times
Reputation: 711

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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I enjoyed reading all the replies, I think the majority of these can be summed up pretty easily:

1. By far, the most popular response was jobs/money. I can understand this as I actually have a job in the city (and 'live' there Monday-Thursday as a consultant), but again, what is the huge issue with working in the city and travelling outside the city to live?

2. The second most popular seemed to be "things to do". I see none of what was mentioned that can't be done in the burbs, but to each his own...

3. A good number also reaffirmed my own hypothesis, that many people move to the city to follow the crowdlook impressive to friends/family, etc. This seems crazy to me, but again, everyone is driven by different motivations.

I guess a good follow up question would be, how many young people (as in a percentage of those graduating college, maybe to around the age of 30 or so) ARE actually living in cities. Is it really all that many, or is it much lower, and just that those who do live there are always talking about it...
Seems pretty reasonable to me. I imagine a lot people are attracted to the social life of being around like minded young people. Especially if you're a single person. In my experience, the suburbs are very limited in that regard. If you combine that with being close to urban amenities(yeah they exist in the suburbs, but are spread out and less) so you don't have drive everywhere and the obvious economic opportunities, then is seems like a no brainer. Some people also enjoy the face pace/energy of city living.
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Old 06-20-2017, 03:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis
11 posts, read 9,977 times
Reputation: 34
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I enjoyed reading all the replies, I think the majority of these can be summed up pretty easily:

1. By far, the most popular response was jobs/money. I can understand this as I actually have a job in the city (and 'live' there Monday-Thursday as a consultant), but again, what is the huge issue with working in the city and travelling outside the city to live?

2. The second most popular seemed to be "things to do". I see none of what was mentioned that can't be done in the burbs, but to each his own...

3. A good number also reaffirmed my own hypothesis, that many people move to the city to follow the crowd/look impressive to friends/family, etc. This seems crazy to me, but again, everyone is driven by different motivations.

I guess a good follow up question would be, how many young people (as in a percentage of those graduating college, maybe to around the age of 30 or so) ARE actually living in cities. Is it really all that many, or is it much lower, and just that those who do live there are always talking about it...
My wife and I are in our early 30's. We both grew up in the burbs, and we both moved to much more urban settings after college for a variety of reasons: jobs, grad school, overall new life experiences. For us at least, it really has nothing to do with looking impressive or following the crowd.

We're willing to pay a premium to live in a city. One of us is able to walk to work and the other has a very short commute (10-15 minutes by car or 30 minutes by public transit). This provides us the luxury of only needing to own one car, which nearly balances out the additional money we spend on higher rent. We're able to step out of our building and go to restaurants, breweries, comedy clubs, sporting venues, etc. within a 10 minute walk. Yes, you can access those things if you live in the burbs, but it's far more of a hassle. Yes, there are restaurants in the burbs, but generally they tend to be of the chain variety.

We were able to easily meet a ton of new people in a new city quickly by moving in to a building/neighborhood with lots of other transplants around our age. Making friends in a suburban neighborhood full of established families would have been significantly more difficult.

At this point in our lives we enjoy the uptempo pace of living in a city and have no use for additional space. I know that our priorities will shift once we have kids; we'll leave the city at some point for more space and better schools. Just as it seems crazy to you that people would choose to live in a city, it's crazy to us that people our age would choose to live in the burbs.
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Old 06-20-2017, 07:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
I feel what you mean. While I would totally live in downtown Minneapolis if I got a good price on an apartment, in the end, I'd rather a suburban area not too far from the city. Some people have an obsession with "being in the heart of the action," ehh. I'd rather be somewhere more quiet and reserved, and drive to the action when I need my fix.

But I also like my suburbs to be unique enough, to have character and charm, have lots of trees and for not every house to look the same. Somewhere where neighbours say hi to each other and come over for barbecues and where kids ride bikes and play ball outside instead of being inside on their computer/phone/tv all day, and where its not just old frumpy people, is ideal.

I'm young, early 20s, and totally get the appeal of the city but the city is a place I'd rather hang around than sleep in. I'm about affordability, too. And if the suburbs are generally cheaper, thats another draw.
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Old 06-20-2017, 09:54 PM
 
Location: North America
1,152 posts, read 1,474,881 times
Reputation: 1228
young people like cities because they like being near people. The only other choice is living in farmland where you live 10 or 20 miles from another person. Just corn fields and cows as neighbors. Who wants to get water from a well when you can just turn on the tap and get water. Thats why I live in a city.
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:52 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,378,103 times
Reputation: 10924
One big thing for me is being able to live fine without being tied to a car. I had a car and drove everywhere for years, everything seemed so spread out and the car was just a pain always having to get from place to place. It felt like it isolated everyone.

In Chicago I ditched the car completely for around 10 years. Saved thousands and thousands a year, paid my $75 for a monthly transit pass and it worked out great. Bars, restaurants, the train station, shops, Target, the park, lakefront - all within a 10 minute walk and I didn't have to mess with a vehicle at all. I LOVED being able to walk to everything. The train downtown was extremely easy, comes every 3-4 minutes most of the day and runs all night.

I have had a car now the past few years, but mostly just to go back home to visit my family or my in-laws family. Still when we go to the grocery store or Target we always just choose to walk the few blocks, I never drive. Just go once or twice a week and walk over with your bags, I really enjoy it.

I like the city because it feels so much more energetic and there are things to do all the time all around you without having to get into your car and shuttle from event to event.

I like to go out to bars, restaurants and parties along with all my friends. Most of them don't have cars, or drive very rarely. I only have a few friends who actually even drive a car to their job. We all like to drink and party, so it's been really nice that we all live within an easy walk or a quick bus/train from each other and go out all the time - and yet in 15 years having to "drive home" or figure out transportation after you've been drinking has never once entered the equation.
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Old 06-21-2017, 08:58 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,868,792 times
Reputation: 5856
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I enjoyed reading all the replies, I think the majority of these can be summed up pretty easily:

1. By far, the most popular response was jobs/money. I can understand this as I actually have a job in the city (and 'live' there Monday-Thursday as a consultant), but again, what is the huge issue with working in the city and travelling outside the city to live?

2. The second most popular seemed to be "things to do". I see none of what was mentioned that can't be done in the burbs, but to each his own...

3. A good number also reaffirmed my own hypothesis, that many people move to the city to follow the crowd/look impressive to friends/family, etc. This seems crazy to me, but again, everyone is driven by different motivations.

I guess a good follow up question would be, how many young people (as in a percentage of those graduating college, maybe to around the age of 30 or so) ARE actually living in cities. Is it really all that many, or is it much lower, and just that those who do live there are always talking about it...
Depending on the size of your metro area, commuting is a HUGE deal. I used to live in the burbs (not by choice) and had a 1 hr + commute each way that I hated, now I live in the city and my drive is 15 minutes each way, so that is 90+ minutes a day that I'm not in my car anymore, plus so many things close to the apartment to do when off work, without having to drive 20+ mins
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:20 AM
 
Location: Boston, MA
8,729 posts, read 7,682,608 times
Reputation: 7650
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chug61 View Post

At this point in our lives we enjoy the uptempo pace of living in a city and have no use for additional space. I know that our priorities will shift once we have kids; we'll leave the city at some point for more space and better schools. Just as it seems crazy to you that people would choose to live in a city, it's crazy to us that people our age would choose to live in the burbs.
You kinda go against your own ideas here. It's not crazy at all.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,581 posts, read 17,567,761 times
Reputation: 27672
I'm young-ish, 31, but live in a small town that is a little more than three hours away from the nearest major metro (Charlotte) and an hour and a half away from Knoxville, TN (nearest metro approaching a million). I also spent the last three years in the suburbs of Indianapolis.

Personally, I'm not big on true urban living. I grew up with space and prefer space. I'm also not big on being isolated in a small town or rural area.

Many professionals have to move to at least a mid-sized metro area for employment. There's often not a lot in small towns and rural areas outside of the medical systems, local government (including schools), and low end work like call centers, retail, and restaurants. For white collar work like finance and IT, there are very few options in small towns and rural areas. I have a good job in my small town, but if something happened to it, I'd likely have to move to make anything close to what I do now.

Young people want to be around other young people. The town I live in has a median age of 45. I'm the only person on my team at work under 50. The dating pool here for post-college professionals is practically nonexistent. I spend more time with people in their 50s-60s (and even older!) than people my own age.

People of all ages want to live where there are amenities. My town of 50,000 has multiple stores from the same regional grocer, a small Target, one dumpy Kroger, and Walmart. That's it for your basic shopping. The mall is barely hanging on. On an organic or special diet? Good luck accommodating that here. Farm to table or healthy restaurants? Better be ready to drive an hour and a half each way to Asheville, NC. Can't find something at Walmart? Better get on Amazon. Enjoy concerts, professional or major college sports? Those are weekend only pursuits and are hours away. We have great outdoor recreation, but during the winter and such, you better make your own fun.
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Old 06-21-2017, 09:37 AM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
1,798 posts, read 1,163,299 times
Reputation: 2321
More high paying jobs are in cities than small towns it is rocket science.
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Old 06-21-2017, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,316 posts, read 6,972,968 times
Reputation: 3503
To simplify my answer, I think walkability is the number one reason for most people. And that is also why suburbs are becoming more walkable as well.
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