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Old 06-22-2017, 11:01 AM
 
60 posts, read 49,856 times
Reputation: 32

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Yeah, thats exactly what I meant. In Chicago and SF, there was a Jewel Osco and a Safeway within a 5-10min walk from my place. In NYC I had plenty of options close by and currently in DC there is a Whole Foods, Trader Joes and some smaller shops all within a 10 min walk from me. I've never wanted or needed a car in any of these cities and it was more of a headache and very costly to have one. Charlotte, I would assume is more like when I lived in Atlanta, where you definitely need a car to survive.

For me living in the city brings about a lot of conveniences. Within a 10 minute walk I can get to my dentist, doctor, veterinarian, over ~40 bars and restaurants to choose from, numerous retail stores, two large grocery stores, a metro stop, multiple bus stops, zipcar everywhere, 2 decent sized parks, 2 dog parks. Also, my work is a 20 min walk away.
Sure, but being from/now in the DC area, I know how expensive that city is...it really is quite a monetary sacrifice all for that 'convenience'.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:17 AM
 
Location: New South
6 posts, read 2,552 times
Reputation: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
Sure, but being from/now in the DC area, I know how expensive that city is...it really is quite a monetary sacrifice all for that 'convenience'.
Its worth it for me. Living without being stuck in traffic and wasting countless hours every morning and evening is worth every penny. I also enjoy the energy, vibe and progressive mindsets for the most part that comes with being in the city. You get what you pay for at the end of the day.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:23 AM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,884,064 times
Reputation: 3491
Pretty simple: things to do.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:27 AM
 
60 posts, read 49,856 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Pretty simple: things to do.
I guess it just depends what people like to do. If your ideal day is spent eating at 8 different organic ethnic restaurants, going to the dog park for a few hours and making friends with new, 'progressive' people, then going out to another 5 different bars at night, the city might be worth it; from these responses that's what it seems to be lol.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:34 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
Having lived in a couple different cities for a few years, I can honestly attest to the fact that, at least in my experience, the 'convenience' factor is totally overblown, if not outright false. A typical, honest, example of me wanting to go grocery shopping in the suburbs and downtown:

Suburb: Get in my car, drive 7 minutes to the grocery store, load all the groceries in the car and go home right to my door.

City: Because parking is nowhere to be found near the grocery store, and the traffic is so bad, I opt to take the subway/walk. Walk 10 minutes to the nearest train station, take a 10 minute train ride to the nearest grocery store (don't even get me started on the issue of having no decent grocery stores in cities...), take another 5 minute walk from that station to the grocery store. Pay ~%30-40 percent more for groceries than in the 'burbs, with less selection and variety. Then carry 5 bags of groceries to the station, take the train back, walk back to the apartment, and bring them inside.

Now, you can obviously consider the cost aspect of not owning a car with the city option, but from a pure convenience perspective (what many are arguing_, the competition just isn't there.

Maybe I am just more familiar with nicer suburbs...
I'm sorry I don't know anyone who walks to the subway just to run to the grocery store.

I can either walk 5 minutes to Jewel or walk 4 minutes to Whole Foods. They're both the same full-service stores I find when I go to the suburbs and the prices are the same.

Since when are there no decent grocery stores in the city? I tend to find the variety better than the average burb, and much closer as well since there tends to be a lot more density in the supermarket, restaurant, shopping, services, etc options.

I like how people are explaining counter points to your discussion about convenience about being in the city, but you just shoot them down and tell them their personal experiences are wrong compared to how you live in the suburbs and assume it must be in the city.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:39 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
Having lived in a couple different cities for a few years, I can honestly attest to the fact that, at least in my experience, the 'convenience' factor is totally overblown, if not outright false. A typical, honest, example of me wanting to go grocery shopping in the suburbs and downtown:

Suburb: Get in my car, drive 7 minutes to the grocery store, load all the groceries in the car and go home right to my door.

City: Because parking is nowhere to be found near the grocery store, and the traffic is so bad, I opt to take the subway/walk. Walk 10 minutes to the nearest train station, take a 10 minute train ride to the nearest grocery store (don't even get me started on the issue of having no decent grocery stores in cities...), take another 5 minute walk from that station to the grocery store. Pay ~%30-40 percent more for groceries than in the 'burbs, with less selection and variety. Then carry 5 bags of groceries to the station, take the train back, walk back to the apartment, and bring them inside.

Now, you can obviously consider the cost aspect of not owning a car with the city option, but from a pure convenience perspective (what many are arguing_, the competition just isn't there.

Maybe I am just more familiar with nicer suburbs...
I'm curious what cities you've lived in? It's obviously going to be very different if your cities are Atlanta or Charlotte compared to New York or Chicago.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:41 AM
 
60 posts, read 49,856 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
I'm sorry I don't know anyone who walks to the subway just to run to the grocery store.

I can either walk 5 minutes to Jewel or walk 4 minutes to Whole Foods. They're both the same full-service stores I find when I go to the suburbs and the prices are the same.

Since when are there no decent grocery stores in the city? I tend to find the variety better than the average burb, and much closer as well since there tends to be a lot more density in the supermarket, restaurant, shopping, services, etc options.

I like how people are explaining counter points to your discussion about convenience about being in the city, but you just shoot them down and tell them their personal experiences are wrong compared to how you live in the suburbs and assume it must be in the city.
I'm not assuming anything...I've lived in multiple major downtown areas, and I have not personally experienced any of the real conveniences that people often tout as a great benefit of city living. The only tangible thing people have offered is that they don't need to have a car, and the related expenses. That even, is not really a benefit in most cases assuming you can afford a car.
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:53 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm not assuming anything...I've lived in multiple major downtown areas, and I have not personally experienced any of the real conveniences that people often tout as a great benefit of city living. The only tangible thing people have offered is that they don't need to have a car, and the related expenses. That even, is not really a benefit in most cases assuming you can afford a car.
in which cities did you live downtown?
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Old 06-22-2017, 11:58 AM
 
60 posts, read 49,856 times
Reputation: 32
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
in which cities did you live downtown?
Philly and Charlotte; from DC area originally but never lived downtown, go there quite often though.
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Old 06-22-2017, 01:48 PM
 
Location: DMV Area
1,004 posts, read 602,222 times
Reputation: 1872
Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm not assuming anything...I've lived in multiple major downtown areas, and I have not personally experienced any of the real conveniences that people often tout as a great benefit of city living. The only tangible thing people have offered is that they don't need to have a car, and the related expenses. That even, is not really a benefit in most cases assuming you can afford a car.
So why don't you just move to the suburbs instead of looking for validation on a message board for a personal preference?
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