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Old 06-23-2017, 07:16 PM
 
4,479 posts, read 2,663,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kodachrome919 View Post
I'm not assuming anything...I've lived in multiple major downtown areas, and I have not personally experienced any of the real conveniences that people often tout as a great benefit of city living. The only tangible thing people have offered is that they don't need to have a car, and the related expenses. That even, is not really a benefit in most cases assuming you can afford a car.
In big cities and even mid-sized ones like mine, a ton of people earn six figures and CHOOSE not to have cars. Towers full of $3,000/mo apartments will typically have far fewer parking spaces than housing units.

I find my seven-minute walk to work pretty awesome BTW. Some co-workers travel 90 minutes each way. That plus a love for urbanity are my biggest reasons to live Downtown.
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Old 06-23-2017, 10:34 PM
 
1,185 posts, read 874,675 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I wouldn't say it's difficult to meet new people in the suburbs. I was only 28 then, but I made friends through work and the community, though admittedly many of the folks I met in the community were 45+.
Well, that's just it. Most young people have more in common with someone that's around their age rather than someone that's almost 20 years there senior. So, if you want to make friends with people around your age, usually a city is better, but if you want to make friends with people in their late 40's-60's, then I would agree suburbs have plenty of those people.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I really don't think city living is truly that much different on a day to day basis. Most of us go to work, come home, watch TV/take care of kids/maybe go to gym for a few hours, then restart. Going out a few nights per week can quickly get expensive.
Sure, that's the life most of us middle-aged people live. But this thread is about young people, who generally aren't married and don't have kids until their late 20's, at which point they're not really young anymore. Now not all cities are the same, and Indy may not really be that much more exciting than the suburbs, but in many big cities you might be surprised to find out that people don't just go home after work, work out, watch TV, and go to sleep. There are all kinds of free or cheap activities that are going on every day in a lot of big cities, from free concerts, to street fairs, free movies in the park, food truck festivals, free museum nights, winter carnivals, and city park league sports to name a few.
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Old 06-23-2017, 11:09 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
38 posts, read 41,430 times
Reputation: 71
I moved to my city (Little Rock) because of the job. I moved to my neighborhood in Little Rock because it's the only truly walkable neighborhood in the entire area. I'm less than 1,000 feet from a kroger and within super close walking distance to some coffee shops, bars, restaurants, etc...
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Old 06-24-2017, 10:24 AM
 
Location: NW Arkansas
76 posts, read 53,542 times
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1. Job - a good paying job, also good to be in a field that the metro/city is strong in. If you need to get a new job or position it is nice to know you can get something without moving

2. Other young professionals - obviously every metro is going to have a lot of people of most ages. But cities like Austin/Portland or Chicago are getting a lot more young people just because a lot of other young people are already there. They pull in other young people like a magnet

3. Warm - I personally don't want to live in a place that has a harsh winter.

4. Entertainment - parks, natural beauty, pro sports, theaters, good food/beer scene
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Old 06-24-2017, 01:22 PM
 
214 posts, read 224,872 times
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Job opportunities for the most part. It is a shame because I feel more opportunities should be allowed in many other cities/towns too. Cities can be horrible places to live and travel within, add to that the vehicle congestion and filthy environment it's not good for a person's health. Not much can be done at the moment though because big cities have established themselves as the epicentres for jobs and pay.
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Old 06-24-2017, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Inland FL
1,248 posts, read 718,341 times
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Its too expensive to go out and party the streets reguarly. Thats money that should be going to savings or investments.

After working a 8 hour shift do people really feel like going out anyway?
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Old 06-24-2017, 07:29 PM
 
Location: The Windy City
5,300 posts, read 3,299,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by floridarebel View Post
Its too expensive to go out and party the streets reguarly. Thats money that should be going to savings or investments.

After working a 8 hour shift do people really feel like going out anyway?

Young people like the city because there are more options for socializing. My downstairs neighbors are college students and they are constantly going out to bars, going out with friends, and going to music events.

The older I become (I'll be 30 pretty soon), the more I realize that I would rather just come straight home from work, cook some dinner, sit down, watch some TV, read a book, then go to bed. I could do all of this in a small town. In fact, I lived in a small town for several years. My Monday - Friday life changed very little by moving to a big city. Now that I think about it, I actually prefer the M-F life I had in the small town. I could come home from work in about 5 minutes and not have the stress of traffic.

However, the weekend is different. I enjoy living in a big city because there are lots of cultural options to keep me busy. Also, I'm a foodie, so being limited to just a few restaurants would be terrible.
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Old 06-25-2017, 09:42 AM
 
93 posts, read 67,017 times
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There is an excitement to living in a big city that is hard to describe. Reading Fitzgerald's descriptions of New York in The Great Gatsby captures the sense of endless possibility and excitement there is in big cities.
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Old 06-26-2017, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,571 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lepoisson View Post
Young people like the city because there are more options for socializing. My downstairs neighbors are college students and they are constantly going out to bars, going out with friends, and going to music events.

The older I become (I'll be 30 pretty soon), the more I realize that I would rather just come straight home from work, cook some dinner, sit down, watch some TV, read a book, then go to bed. I could do all of this in a small town. In fact, I lived in a small town for several years. My Monday - Friday life changed very little by moving to a big city. Now that I think about it, I actually prefer the M-F life I had in the small town. I could come home from work in about 5 minutes and not have the stress of traffic.

However, the weekend is different. I enjoy living in a big city because there are lots of cultural options to keep me busy. Also, I'm a foodie, so being limited to just a few restaurants would be terrible.
I'm a little older than you (31) but I have an opposite view.

I'm from (and still live in) my small hometown in Tennessee but spent most of the last five years in affluent Midwestern suburbs of major cities. My day to day life here is much more limited than when I lived in Indianapolis especially.

I probably went to half the Pacers home games. You can get balcony tickets for $10 or so for most games, so it's really no more expensive than a movie. I also went to lots of the AAA team's baseball games and probably half a dozen Colts games. There are no pro sports within three hours of here. The closest major college is about two hours away. We do have "rookie league" professional baseball teams, but they only play from last week until the end of August - less than half of a baseball season. There is a regional state university the next town over, but it's a far cry from any major sport. I've been to one baseball game (a single A game in Asheville, NC) all year, but probably would have been to several Reds games and a half dozen or more local games in Indy by now.

There are hardly ever any national bands coming through the area. Most concerts within two hours are just local bands. I would go see a concert every couple of months or so - that's not really possible here without devoting a weekend to out of town travel. I'll go out for some local band but it's not the same at all.

Shopping? It's extremely limited here. Amazon is my best friend. Prices on a lot of consumer goods (especially groceries) are more expensive here than in Indianapolis, largely due to a lack of competition. Selection on anything is poor. The local Kroger where I lived had all sorts of premade entrees you could buy and cook at home - none of that is available here. When I lived in Des Moines, I was literally across the street from the largest mall in Iowa. Here, the nearest healthy mall is a half hour from where I live.

I've also noticed some weird quirks you wouldn't expect. We're a town of about 50,000, and a new YMCA was built about five years ago. It basically drove all the private health clubs out of business. You'd think being in a small town the gym wouldn't be as crowded as in Indy or Des Moines - WRONG! The YMCA is more crowded than any of the gyms I used in the major cities, because it is the only game in town. In Indy, if one YMCA was too crowded or you didn't like it, there were at least five more in the metro. Don't like the Y? Join Lifetime Fitness or LA Fitness. Don't like that? Join Planet Fitness. Want something more hardcore? There's a Gold's Gym too. There were so many more options that you didn't get the crowding going on from having one good facility for the entire town.

Other than my family being here, no traffic, and the better outdoor opportunities, I don't like it here. Frankly, I feel a bit deprived and like I'm wasting time living here.
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Old 06-26-2017, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,571 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Texamichiforniasota View Post
Well, that's just it. Most young people have more in common with someone that's around their age rather than someone that's almost 20 years there senior. So, if you want to make friends with people around your age, usually a city is better, but if you want to make friends with people in their late 40's-60's, then I would agree suburbs have plenty of those people.

Sure, that's the life most of us middle-aged people live. But this thread is about young people, who generally aren't married and don't have kids until their late 20's, at which point they're not really young anymore. Now not all cities are the same, and Indy may not really be that much more exciting than the suburbs, but in many big cities you might be surprised to find out that people don't just go home after work, work out, watch TV, and go to sleep. There are all kinds of free or cheap activities that are going on every day in a lot of big cities, from free concerts, to street fairs, free movies in the park, food truck festivals, free museum nights, winter carnivals, and city park league sports to name a few.
I don't disagree. Those are draws for many people, and when I was in Indy, I did some of those things, but it wasn't an every night deal. I was out maybe two out of the five business days a week.

All the activities you listed are outdoor, summer things. A lot of things die down in the winter, especially in a cold weather place like Indy.

I'm not trying to suggest all there aren't things to do in a major city. There clearly are a lot more things to do than in a small town/rural area like where I am now, but most places and most people are not engaging in some sort of public-ish activity on a daily basis.
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