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Old 06-28-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,388,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
See above

Haha, very nice! Vivid descriptions, I like!

The description for Southwest Ward is very much what I had in mind, too.
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Old 06-28-2017, 06:22 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,388,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
My thoughts below:

Wellport - Biloxi, MS: gentrifying warehouse district on the Gulf Coast, with a massive influx of them hipsters.

Golden Ridge - Washington, DC: wealthy residential area with large houses, where politicians' families live.

Harbour Cape - Boston: former municipal dry docks, that recently became a yuppie nightlife district.

Queenston - Providence, RI: old-money wealthy neighborhood with surprisingly understated homes.

Westwood - St. Paul, MN: a commercial area that's kind of generic, but quite safe and pleasant to visit.

Breezy Pointe - Flagstaff, AZ: allegedly a serene nature escape, but in practice, a bland housing subdivision.

Sunset View - Los Angeles: former theater district that became a glitzy condominium row on Sunset Blvd.

Oak Plain - Saint Louis, MO: upper-class residential area with large houses but down-to-earth people.

Mint Ridge - Charlotte, NC: nondescript middle-class housing subdivision with an overly strict HOA.

Ocean Park - Tallahassee, FL: beachy, working-class residential area that, for some reason, never gentrified.

Southwest Ward - San Francisco: gritty but relatively safe neighborhood with small houses.

East Shore - Atlantic City, NJ: a historic middle-class mixed-use area that became overran with corporate chains.

Fortuna Springs - Los Angeles: snooty new-money gated community near the eastern city limits.

Shady Grove - Atlanta: historic residential area with wide boulevards and plantation-style houses.

Spring Haven - Hartford, CT: residential area with luxury condominiums, where Masters and Ph.D. students live.

Temple Square - Philadelphia: formerly a Jewish enclave of walk-ups and small shops, but now a decaying neighborhood.

Plumwood - Memphis: a run-down, high-crime neighborhood, nicknamed "The Plummet" by criminal-minded residents.

Marshy Oaks - New Orleans: previously a wetland, now a newly build subdivision with nondescript tract homes.

Carmelita - San Diego: working-class neighborhood near the Mexican border, with small houses and busy streets.

Bloomingdale - Chicago: nondescript industrial neighborhood full of warehouses, convenience stores, and walk-up apartments.

Walnut Park - Kansas City, MO: nondescript working-class residential area with bungalows and two-flats.
Damn, Tallahassee must have annexed a lot of land that they now have a beach!
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:48 PM
 
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How has nobody pointed out that Westwood is actually the name of one of the most prominent neighborhoods in Los Angeles?
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Old 06-28-2017, 09:01 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
3,515 posts, read 1,602,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Damn, Tallahassee must have annexed a lot of land that they now have a beach!
I meant that Ocean Park looked and felt like a beach community, due to house architecture and being located around a small lake. I wasn't saying that it actually had a ocean beach. Come to think of it, this might be why Ocean Park never gentrified .

I got the idea from Fox Lake, a Chicago suburb. It's next to a small lake, it looks like a beachy lake town, and it's far from ritzy.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 06-28-2017 at 09:16 PM..
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Old 06-28-2017, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
I meant that Ocean Park looked and felt like a beach community, due to house architecture and being located around a small lake. I wasn't saying that it actually had a ocean beach. Come to think of it, this might be why Ocean Park never gentrified .

I got the idea from Fox Lake, a Chicago suburb. It's next to a small lake, it looks like a beachy lake town, and it's far from ritzy.
Aaah okay. That's interesting. I imagine northern Illinois has some pretty beachy towns along Lake Michigan though, eh?
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Old 06-29-2017, 02:49 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
What are they actually called?
Sunset Mesa and Fortuna Row.
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Old 06-29-2017, 11:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by kehkou View Post
Sunset Mesa and Fortuna Row.
Aah, okay. I was actually thinking more of Las Vegas when I came up with "Fortuna Springs" ("Fortuna" means luck or fortune in Spanish)
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Old 06-30-2017, 03:09 AM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,730 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Aah, okay. I was actually thinking more of Las Vegas when I came up with "Fortuna Springs" ("Fortuna" means luck or fortune in Spanish)
Yeah I always thought of it as being an ironic name for that block, like a pit bull named Kitty...
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Old 06-30-2017, 08:13 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Aaah okay. That's interesting. I imagine northern Illinois has some pretty beachy towns along Lake Michigan though, eh?
That's questionable, lol. There are no true beach towns on Lake Michigan, probably because the water is warm enough to swim in for just two months out of the year. The most picturesque publicly accessible lakefront is in Chicago proper, believe it or not.

Suburbs north of it look very nice, but they screwed the pooch as far as their lakefronts are concerned. North Shore suburbs sold off most of their lakefronts to wealthy households, with just a smidgen remaining as obscenely overpriced city beaches (up to $15 to enter) with minimal services. Farther north, there's a US Navy base and former industrial lands lining the lakefront. There is, however, a borderline-wild beach in a state park near the Wisconsin border.

Fox Lake is located on a small lake of the same name; it's nowhere near Lake Michigan. It does, however, look a lot like a beach town: marinas galore, small waterfront houses, restaurants with docking slips, and grungy boat repair shops all over town. Another example of such towns is Wauconda, although its new construction is very blah.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; 06-30-2017 at 08:36 AM..
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Old 07-02-2017, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,388,244 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MillennialUrbanist View Post
That's questionable, lol. There are no true beach towns on Lake Michigan, probably because the water is warm enough to swim in for just two months out of the year. The most picturesque publicly accessible lakefront is in Chicago proper, believe it or not.

Suburbs north of it look very nice, but they screwed the pooch as far as their lakefronts are concerned. North Shore suburbs sold off most of their lakefronts to wealthy households, with just a smidgen remaining as obscenely overpriced city beaches (up to $15 to enter) with minimal services. Farther north, there's a US Navy base and former industrial lands lining the lakefront. There is, however, a borderline-wild beach in a state park near the Wisconsin border.

Fox Lake is located on a small lake of the same name; it's nowhere near Lake Michigan. It does, however, look a lot like a beach town: marinas galore, small waterfront houses, restaurants with docking slips, and grungy boat repair shops all over town. Another example of such towns is Wauconda, although its new construction is very blah.
Well the same is true for Michigan (even colder) but they have lots of beach towns.

I google mapped the Fox Lake area, it looks cute. Looks like it could fit in Wisconsin or Minnesota.
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