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Old 06-28-2017, 06:17 PM
 
33 posts, read 16,976 times
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I feel out of place anywhere that's obviously affluent or most places that are new and "hip."

My frugality and simple tastes put me at home somewhere low-key with down to earth people. I'm basically the prototype midwesterner at heart.
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Old 06-28-2017, 07:30 PM
 
4,407 posts, read 4,615,859 times
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Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
I recently went to Walmart in the city of Cleveland. Nearly everyone there was African-American or Latino. People were just there to shop so I was comfortable and didn't have a negative experience but I clearly stood out in terms of attire and I am not used to being the only white person in a public space, especially where I live and go out in Columbus. Made me think how people of color feel in all or mostly white environments.
I would say I have always been somewhat of an outsider among my fellow whites so I kind of like being in a situation where I'm in a white minority. I would rather be judged for being white than being judged by whites on whatever criteria they are using.
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Old 06-28-2017, 07:39 PM
 
4,407 posts, read 4,615,859 times
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Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
I would agree with Arkansas. There is a fake, cloying sweetness with undercurrents of banjo music. The Bible Belt is creepy in general but it takes on a whole new dimension there. Much the same with southwest Missouri -- Springfield, Branson, etc. I was raised in Missouri and you can feel the increasing intensity of the fake judgmental holiness as you move in that direction.

I've had reason to be in all the major cities in Texas and in several small ones. For reasons I can't really explain, I can't abide Texas. I've tried to find a way to tolerate it and find a place where it didn't turn my stomach but to no avail. When I'm there I can't wait to get away. Being out in west Texas or in some of the Hill Country is not so bad...maybe not many Texans there? I can't point to one thing that makes it so dislikable but it is a combination of many things that I can't get past.
A decade ago I did a job in SW Missouri videotaping a children's dance competition. I was minding my own business when a guy apparently started following me...into the men's restroom. He then went up to the owners of the company and accused me of j*ck*ing off in the bathroom (which I would never do). I'm not sure if that was just one crazy individual or if it has anything to do with him being from that neck of the woods.
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:28 PM
 
482 posts, read 252,047 times
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Atlanta, Georgia
I spent some time there when it first began to boom as a major city. I thought its downtown was very underwhelming for a metro area its size. I also thought the development patterns were haphazard and illogical.

Plus I felt racial segregation was very alive and well in the social sense. There was little overt tension between blacks and whites, but socially they seemed to want nothing to do with one another at all. It was odd for a booming New South destination that was probably the most popular city among mobile middle-class black Americans to feel more backwards racially than the declining medium-sized Midwestern metro I had grown up in (I'm black also, fwiw).

Chicago, Illinois
At the time I started travelling to Chicago frequently for work, I had been living in a very small Midwestern town several hours away for many years. It was during a phase in my life when Alpha cities intimidated me. It was too much for me at the time -- all the desolate ghettos, the curt personalities, the insane traffic and aggressive drivers. At the time I was ecstatic to be able to change careers and not have to go back there.

However after I left and traveled to many new places, Chicago gradually began to grow in stature. I was always taken aback every time I traveled someplace new that I expected to be snazzy, only to discover the new place did not measure up to a place I was supposed to dislike. The Windy City just began to impress me based on the comparisons; it inserted itself in my mind as the standard by which I judged all other cities (at least until I visited, fell in love with, and moved to Dallas). For better or for worse, Chicago is one of America's five greatest cities (caveat being that greatest and best are not necessarily the same thing).

Denver, Colorado
Imagine my horror when I fulfilled the dreams of untold numbers of people across the country by relocating to Colorado, only to discover I'm apparently not the biggest fan of huge mountains. I prefer beaches and to a lesser extent forests. You guys can have the skiing and other winter sports.

The Rocky Mountain panorama never ceased to impress me when I viewed it from a distance, but the view really was enough. Being in the Rockies could quickly get dangerous in a number of ways, and those peaks are the flat-out enemies of travel infrastructure (like good roads). I was so relieved to get out of there and no longer have to concern myself with being looked at like an alien for insisting the thrill of "Jeeping" along the sides of steep drop-offs was overrated.

San Antonio, Texas
The mentality of the people left a lot to be desired. Obviously there were exceptions, but I felt like way too many of the residents there lacked intellectual curiosity. It was too prevalent for me to be able to get away from it by simply avoiding certain crowds. Regardless of the circles we moved in, when my family and I lived there we were always made to feel like awkward outsiders simply for thinking of and trying different things. I'm afraid I can't be any more specific without saying some things that might come across in a way I don't really intend.
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:30 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,213,924 times
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Yes.

Felt like a fish out of water the entire 14 years I lived in suburban Detroit (not my hometown). I found it to be dull, incredibly conservative, and very insular culturally. I had to constantly remind myself that, yes, it IS one of the largest cities in the US. On the other had, there was a palpable materialistic, competitive, and uptight vibe. And talk about an invisible but solid wall between the city and suburbs (thanks for reminding me of segregation, physical and social, between blacks and whites, dallasgoldrush. It's alive and well in Metro Detroit)! I was SO happy to leave.

I'm now in Nashville, which has a lively downtown core. I also find the people to be much more open and considerably less culturally conservative, despite its reputation as the "buckle of the Bible belt."

Last edited by newdixiegirl; 06-28-2017 at 08:44 PM..
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Old 06-28-2017, 08:45 PM
 
482 posts, read 252,047 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
Yes.

Felt like a fish out of water the entire 14 years I lived in suburban Detroit. I found it to be dull, incredibly conservative, and very insular culturally. I had to constantly remind myself that, yes, it IS one of the largest cities in the US. On the other had, there was a palpable materialistic, competitive, and uptight vibe. And talk about an invisible but solid wall between the city and suburbs (thanks for reminding me of segregation, physical and social, between blacks and whites, dallasgoldrush. It's alive and well in Metro Detroit). I was SO happy to leave.

I'm now in Nashville, which has a lively downtown core. I also find the people to be much more open and considerably less culturally conservative, despite its reputation as the "buckle of the Bible belt."
Nashville was a place that surprised me in the opposite way. I LOVED it! You made an excellent choice.
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Old 06-28-2017, 10:11 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,826 posts, read 12,344,313 times
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I felt extremely out of place in New Jersey, the Washington DC area and Southern California when visiting or going to school in these places.

I felt at home in suburban Baltimore, suburban New Orleans, suburban Baton Rouge, and in the Charleston, West Virginia area. I am Asian American like a previous poster but I am also a native Southerner and fit in best in the South culturally, religiously, politically and in terms of my outlook and pace of living. I still believe in Southern hospitality and a sense of community and getting to know people while the DC area and California were extremely elitist, anti-social, unfriendly and also very un-accepting to any views outside the PC left wing. I happen to be a conservative Christian and a Republican as well who grew up in a working class family.

Most of my friends honestly have been white working class, oftentimes rural people. I found West Virginia to be particularly accepting to newcomers if you respect the way of life and just adapt to the culture there. In terms of food and music I particularly feel I belong in Louisiana and in the South in general. In the DC area and California they would be "disgusted" by things like country fried steak, fried catfish, sweet tea, would look down on drinking Bud Light and Coors etc and some of the areas had nanny state laws dictating what ingredients restaurants are even allowed to cook with. A lot of people I met from DC and California looked down on me for being a Christian, for liking things like Waffle House and Denny's, for listening to country music, shopping at Walmart etc. They are also the ones who tell me because I'm a minority I shouldn't listen to country music, shouldn't have Southern pride, shouldn't be a Republican etc etc.
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Old 06-28-2017, 10:47 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,380,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
1. I felt so, and was so, out of place in San Diego. Didn't care for living in that area one bit.

2. I didn't fit in, per se, in the rural area I grew up in in the upper South, yet I didn't feel out of place there at the same time.

3. I feel out of place in L.A. and San Francisco, and yet those metropolises are so large that I can blend in at the same time.
I agree about SD and LA. I lived in SD for four years and then LA for a year. I always felt I was on a different wavelength than SD. I felt more comfortable in LA actually because it was so big but it still wasn't quite right for me. KC was somewhere I felt like I fit in well for the first few years but later I realized it was not the case. Seattle feels like home to me... the landscape, culture, climate and lifestyle is definitely what I had been looking for. Portland I think would be similar. Non-California West Coast is my place for sure.
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Old 06-29-2017, 02:22 AM
 
221 posts, read 153,459 times
Reputation: 161
Tucson az despite being most liberal place in az wasn't that welcome to me as immigrant from eu.felt alienate there and people may seems chill and friendly at first but then you see lot of passive aggressive and rudeness behind mask.lot of weirdos wandered around too. I think heat get to peoples head.vibe was strange .im in pa now and northeast people pa nj, are more straight forward genuine what you see you get .
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Old 06-29-2017, 09:51 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,406,762 times
Reputation: 2093
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
I felt extremely out of place in New Jersey, the Washington DC area and Southern California when visiting or going to school in these places.

I felt at home in suburban Baltimore, suburban New Orleans, suburban Baton Rouge, and in the Charleston, West Virginia area. I am Asian American like a previous poster but I am also a native Southerner and fit in best in the South culturally, religiously, politically and in terms of my outlook and pace of living. I still believe in Southern hospitality and a sense of community and getting to know people while the DC area and California were extremely elitist, anti-social, unfriendly and also very un-accepting to any views outside the PC left wing. I happen to be a conservative Christian and a Republican as well who grew up in a working class family.

Most of my friends honestly have been white working class, oftentimes rural people. I found West Virginia to be particularly accepting to newcomers if you respect the way of life and just adapt to the culture there. In terms of food and music I particularly feel I belong in Louisiana and in the South in general. In the DC area and California they would be "disgusted" by things like country fried steak, fried catfish, sweet tea, would look down on drinking Bud Light and Coors etc and some of the areas had nanny state laws dictating what ingredients restaurants are even allowed to cook with. A lot of people I met from DC and California looked down on me for being a Christian, for liking things like Waffle House and Denny's, for listening to country music, shopping at Walmart etc. They are also the ones who tell me because I'm a minority I shouldn't listen to country music, shouldn't have Southern pride, shouldn't be a Republican etc etc.
Ironically where I grew up in New Jersey is almost about 50% Asian/Asian-American (mostly Chinese and Indian). Many of my peers were the children of immigrants but their parents were extremely educated and upper-middle class to wealthy immigrants. I didn't feel terribly at home in New Jersey either despite being raised there and left for the Midwest.

There's not really a prevalence of evangelism where I'm from in New Jersey. Most people are quietly Catholic, Jewish, Hindu, Muslim etc. but atheism is pretty common as well, especially in younger generations.

I love country music and I can assure you people from New Jersey and D.C. still like drinking coors Although in D.C. it might be for $6-8 dollars a pop lol.
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