U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-27-2017, 07:56 PM
 
164 posts, read 219,253 times
Reputation: 90

Advertisements

Hello,

Has anyone ever noticed the following phenomenon:

In Apia, the capital of Samoa, there are a few blocks that contain:

1. a modern bank and Toyota Dealership.

2. Tall office buildings.

3. Urban looking stores and restaurants with outdoor seating. In other words, like an American downtown.

Yet, 3 minutes away in either direction is rural tropical island life. The transition from the few "Big City style blocks" to "Tropical Samoa" takes less then three blocks:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tghJ9UKMJzY

Note 3:06 to 4:41.

The situation is a few very open blocks surrounded by countryside within less then two minutes and an abrupt transition.

My question is are there any examples within the United States of tiny pockets of Urban Life (maybe a few big city style blocks with office buildings, pedestrian sidewalks, restaurants, etc) surrounded by rural countryside literally a few minutes away?

In other words, has anyone seen any examples of a few very urban big city style blocks within a very rural region or state?

In other words, what was the most out of place tiny island of "Big City" that you have ever seen in an otherwise rural region of the USA?

Thanks
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-27-2017, 10:16 PM
 
4,247 posts, read 9,727,185 times
Reputation: 3788
Renovo, PA has a few blocks of row homes surrounded by many miles of forest.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-27-2017, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
1,256 posts, read 1,480,421 times
Reputation: 1737
Eureka Springs, Arkansas feels like a little San Fran or New Orleans, but is about 2000 residents. It is a touristy area, though. You really feel the isolation at night in the winter. Deer walking down the streets are common.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2017, 07:19 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,951,877 times
Reputation: 10561
Quote:
Originally Posted by ki0eh View Post
Renovo, PA has a few blocks of row homes surrounded by many miles of forest.
In general, PA has a lot of this. Look at a satellite view of the Coal Region, for example. You have these little dense urban boroughs of a few thousand people, which have basically no suburbs at all surrounding them. Manahoy City even has a senior high rise in its downtown.

Nearby Jim Thorpe has a very cute urban main street which goes for many blocks. There are some other neighborhoods in the borough, but it's mostly undeveloped land, including on either side of Boadway, which is built in a ravine with steep hills on either side.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2017, 10:49 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,826 posts, read 12,344,313 times
Reputation: 4783
Charleston, West Virginia
Montgomery, West Virginia
Pikeville, Kentucky
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2017, 10:53 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,380,569 times
Reputation: 8288
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rock Climber View Post
Eureka Springs, Arkansas feels like a little San Fran or New Orleans, but is about 2000 residents. It is a touristy area, though. You really feel the isolation at night in the winter. Deer walking down the streets are common.
Agreed on Eureka Springs. Total gay liberal haven in the middle of rural Arkansas.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-28-2017, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Rochester
847 posts, read 1,639,223 times
Reputation: 1151
I think this sort of thing is actually pretty common with most pre-20th century small towns in the northeast and the south. Most of the well preserved villages have a decent sized main strip of walkable urban retail, some office space, rowhouses and really beautiful architecture within their downtown areas. Out west this is probably less common because rural communities were designed around the automobile and will typically include not much more than a tiny strip mall and a few gas stations. I've seen what OP described all over Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia and most other east coast states.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2017, 08:46 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,530,833 times
Reputation: 2315
Willits, CA is a decent example. Off of Hwy 101, its about the biggest town with "life" for awhile in either direction. Hwy 101 is a long, rural highway that twists and turns but there's not much as far as towns.

Population is around 5000, has a "downtown" with some shops and restaurants, and the school itself is along the "downtown strip" if that tells you anything
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2017, 10:03 AM
 
Location: Cbus
1,721 posts, read 1,406,762 times
Reputation: 2093
I could see some towns in rural Mississippi (maybe the Delta?) that once had theaters, main streets and small businesses etc. having the neglected or ruined remnants of a bigger past.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-29-2017, 11:40 AM
 
Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas via ATX
1,256 posts, read 1,480,421 times
Reputation: 1737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
Agreed on Eureka Springs. Total gay liberal haven in the middle of rural Arkansas.
Here's an aerial view to show how that little slice of "urbanity" is in the sticks.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top