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Old 06-23-2018, 01:20 PM
 
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I think it is more common, but it may be a matter of relativity or may not be completely uniform within the corridor or side of town.
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Old 06-25-2018, 08:29 AM
 
Location: Terramaria
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The closest thing for Baltimore would be the corridor that begins in Roland Park just inside city limits, north to Ruxton, Brooklandville, and up the corridor between Falls Rd and I-83 up through Hunt Valley. You won't find historic town centers like you would in a Philly, NYC metro, Chicago, or San Francisco though outside of a contemporary one in Hunt Valley, with Towson sort of coming close, but is just east of this belt. Most Baltimore wealth is rather isolated and the "upwardly mobile" areas are generally just upper middle class, not to mention Maryland's peak concentration of wealth is in Montgomery, Anne Arundel, and Howard counties due to its proximity to DC. There is a rail line that historically went up to Harrisburg, PA and is still used for MTA Light Rail service today.
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Old 06-25-2018, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Brew City
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edsg25 View Post
If I'm getting your locations right (and I think I am), the Lower East Side is far more urban in nature than the Upper (which tends to be more suburban).......right? So in Chicago, what would be comparable would be this: the North Side lakefront (corresponding to your East Side lakefront) is an area of wealth that runs up from the downtown area, definitely through Lakeview, but north of that, it sort of peters out and the far North Side lakefront (Uptown, Edgewater, Rogers Park) is less desirable. In Milwaukee, my impression is that going north on the lakefront from downtown and into the lakefront suburbs is more solidly "nice" than what we have in Chicago....in the sense that I really don't see the gap in Milwaukee we have in Chicago.

If this makes any sense.

That rain you mentioned? They moved the animals in Lincoln Park Zoo a 1/2 mile to the east on an ark in Lake Michigan. Those were some incredibly wet days.
You did, it does, and you're right about Milwaukee. I don't know much about the Chicago specifics.

And it rained from Milwaukee alllllll the way to Toledo. Unfortunately we hit Chicago around 8:30 am so the rain mixed with the traffic was not fun. Although it was only slightly worse than the driving rain mixed with the terrible Indiana toll roads. They're in awful condition.
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Old 06-25-2018, 07:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Borntoolate85 View Post
The closest thing for Baltimore would be the corridor that begins in Roland Park just inside city limits, north to Ruxton, Brooklandville, and up the corridor between Falls Rd and I-83 up through Hunt Valley. You won't find historic town centers like you would in a Philly, NYC metro, Chicago, or San Francisco though outside of a contemporary one in Hunt Valley, with Towson sort of coming close, but is just east of this belt. Most Baltimore wealth is rather isolated and the "upwardly mobile" areas are generally just upper middle class, not to mention Maryland's peak concentration of wealth is in Montgomery, Anne Arundel, and Howard counties due to its proximity to DC. There is a rail line that historically went up to Harrisburg, PA and is still used for MTA Light Rail service today.
I would also add Guilford which starts just north of Johns Hopkins' main campus. Guilford is a very ritzy, suburban-ish old line looking Baltimore enclave whose houses, to me, are more impressive than Roland Park's, which are nice, too.

Cleveland: definitely The Heights which morph into the Chagrin Valley eastern suburbs to the east in burbs such as Pepper Pike, Gates Mills, Hunting Valley and Moreland Hills, each of which have ridiculous estates; many of which you can't even see from road -- esp Hunting Valley which, per capita, is the wealthiest town in the state income-wise.

Detroit: Detroit's wealthy areas are considerable and excellent, just split up and often distant. The oldest old-line suburbs are the (Grosse) Pointe(s), immediately east, adjacent to Detroit and hugging the Detroit River with outstanding old estates.

Then there's Detroit's own Palmer Woods/Palmer Park/Sherwood Forest inside the north portion of the City. While some fringe-y areas along the southern border along, say, 6-Mile/McNichols are kinda shady/shaky, the core of this area is extremely upscale with beautiful old mansions along winding tree-shaded streets. At one time, Detroit had a special cop force patrolling this upscale nabe-- not sure if that's still the case.

Then farther north of 8-Mile (16 miles from downtown) you have Birmingham, with it's fabulous old-style walkable downtown/retail district and lots of fine homes. Adjacent to this, there's there are the Bloomfields ... Bloomfield Hills, and especially West Bloomfield. This area is sprawling and loaded with mega-estates that one often can't see from the street (on purpose, of course).
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Old 06-26-2018, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Pacific NW
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Seattle has it's own "Gold Coast" on the east shore of Lake Washington. Although the bigger communities of Bellevue and Kirkland are not uniformly wealthy, there is a group of much smaller, wealthier enclaves adjoining them - Medina, Hunts Point, Yarrow Point, Clyde Hill, and tiny Beaux Arts Village. Home to 2 of the richest men on earth (Jeff Bezos and Bill Gates). You could probably throw in Newcastle as well (but NOT Renton ).
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