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Old 06-30-2017, 06:41 PM
 
Location: Cleveland
794 posts, read 1,004,168 times
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So how do you guys classify whether a city is overall doing good or bad? I suppose the GDP of a metro area could be a good indicator... I often hear "crime rate", but what does that mean exactly? the murder rate? crime per capita? and also, where do you get these numbers from? I also suppose the median house price and rental price can be good signs; higher the cost, obviously the nicer a city. I really like to dive into analysis like this regarding US cities and it definitely helps when choosing an area to live. What sort of things or stats do you guys look for in a city? would love to hear some tips or advice
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Old 07-01-2017, 09:12 AM
 
Location: San Francisco Bay Area
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Formal educational levels, unemployment rate, types of industries, median income, crime rates, median home price, real estate appreciation rates, etc
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Old 07-01-2017, 10:07 AM
 
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Crime rates are misleading, and I certainly wouldn't place a high metric to them as in the vast majority of cities the rate is amplified due to a couple of severe pockets you wouldn't be caught dead living in that skew the numbers high.
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Old 07-01-2017, 01:13 PM
 
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Crime rates are actually reporting rates. In a real high-crime area, anything short of murder will often go unreported. It's a common theory that a high reported rate of property crime means the area is more likely to be ok.

I like urban cities, so high transit usage and walking commute shares are impressive. The Census ACS tracks that.

High housing prices can mean prosperity, but other factors go into it. Supply constraints like San Francisco's can boost prices way beyond what would otherwise happen. Also high prices can be about second homes or investors vs. local incomes.
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Old 07-01-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
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Metro population is usually the simplest and best indicator, IMO. Big cities are big because people want to live there, small towns are small because...
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Old 07-01-2017, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
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As a retiree I look at cost of living, weather & services (doctors, hospital, etc.)
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Old 07-01-2017, 02:16 PM
 
3,235 posts, read 1,567,005 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
Metro population is usually the simplest and best indicator, IMO. Big cities are big because people want to live there, small towns are small because...
Big cities grew because of their locations and generally proximity to waterways (rivers, canals, bays, lakes and oceans) for transport of goods bringing goods to ports.
Some were forts that became shipping lanes to railroad transportation hubs with combinations. It is easy to see why out major and midsized cities evolved where they did.

Today we have:

- where corporate America builds by cities in states with the lowest corporate taxes. Choosing cities where migration then is to follow them and steered and where less unionization and fears of it have them move.
- milder winters is growing cities in migrations also.

Cases for past growth and todays can differ. But not every small city was destined to be huge. Location was by far ..... generally key.

Migration from Northern cities and states today has weather, and again..... corporate America choosing where many MUST migrate many times. But these Northern cities .... still have much value stats alone do not tell all.
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Old 07-01-2017, 02:22 PM
 
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Diverse , Multiple thriving industries. If there is only one dominant, there is increase risk and volatility.
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Old 07-01-2017, 03:12 PM
 
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Some corporations go for low prices. Some go specifically to the high-price areas where the top-performing people are.
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Old 07-01-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
1,325 posts, read 1,118,952 times
Reputation: 1112
Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Big cities grew because of their locations and generally proximity to waterways (rivers, canals, bays, lakes and oceans) for transport of goods bringing goods to ports.
Some were forts that became shipping lanes to railroad transportation hubs with combinations. It is easy to see why out major and midsized cities evolved where they did.

Today we have:

- where corporate America builds by cities in states with the lowest corporate taxes. Choosing cities where migration then is to follow them and steered and where less unionization and fears of it have them move.
- milder winters is growing cities in migrations also.

Cases for past growth and todays can differ. But not every small city was destined to be huge. Location was by far ..... generally key.

Migration from Northern cities and states today has weather, and again..... corporate America choosing where many MUST migrate many times. But these Northern cities .... still have much value stats alone do not tell all.
Obviously all true, but looking down the list of most populated metro areas it works out for me to a surprising degree of accuracy, excluding places like Phoenix and the Inland Empire
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