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Old 07-07-2017, 12:37 PM
 
2,025 posts, read 2,355,635 times
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My sister and brother-n-law, after a lifetime living in the heart of Chicago, recently were transferred to Detroit. Ten years ago that would have been like a death sentence to a hard-core Chicagoan, today? They are absolutely in love with their new hometown and are very excited to be part of the gathering energy/revitalization taking place there. I've visited a few times and can attest that something major is stirring there. It's a fabulous city poised for a continued and sustained rebirth.
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Old 07-08-2017, 08:59 PM
 
Location: my little town
1,188 posts, read 408,561 times
Reputation: 1264
Would the Detroit lovers please shut up. We'll get too many climate change refugees.
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Appalachian New York, Formerly Louisiana
4,102 posts, read 4,741,940 times
Reputation: 5374
Cleveland.
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,086 posts, read 4,111,781 times
Reputation: 3704
Memphis is a good candidate. The city continues to lose population, and has high crime. There are a lot of blighted areas as well.
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Old 07-08-2017, 10:46 PM
 
2,797 posts, read 1,645,688 times
Reputation: 2033
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroZetro View Post
Long-term (ish):

Las Vegas is the best candidate. It has the highest % of projected job loss from automation (which of course will hurt every metro) and heavily depends of tourism (meaning it's screwed when a recession hits) plus is already borderline unsuitable for human habitation.

Orlando and Phoenix are pretty high up as well, for the same reasons

In terms of the next Rust Belt and automation the Piedmont South could be hurt as well. Places heavily dependent on manufacturing, tax subsidies and cheap labor like Greenville, Knoxville and Chattanooga
lol
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:18 AM
 
Location: Florida
5,927 posts, read 2,753,127 times
Reputation: 7164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
The problems in Detroit happened as a result of the unions. SC is a right to work to state.
and yet those Unions with their high wages created a wealthy middle class in Detroit...can you say the same for South Carolina?
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,472,170 times
Reputation: 10928
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bobdreamz View Post
and yet those Unions with their high wages created a wealthy middle class in Detroit...can you say the same for South Carolina?
South Carolina is a much more stable economy, over the long haul it's a better economy. Also those big union scale wages you speak of are only for a select few. Most people up there are working in supplier factories, lower wages, even sweat shop conditions with no union. Most of those holding good union GM jobs are over 60 years old and those younger workers who did get in are children of these people......nepotism is not even being hidden. Most people under 55 do not work for high wages in Michigan, they work in lower pay supplier plants during the boom times and get unemployment when the downturn comes. Unions have not created a middle class today, they have created a special privileged class of workers. The good ole union days of mass middle class workers in places like Detroit only exist in a history book. To find it you will need a time machine and set it for 1980 or before. That way of doing things was never sustainable and only worked for a few decades because of US economic dominance in the post ww2 boom.
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Old 07-09-2017, 12:19 PM
 
Location: 'greater' Buffalo, NY
3,067 posts, read 2,109,966 times
Reputation: 3965
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Spot on however the stereotypes run deep and haters love to cling to them, so sometimes it's just not worth the effort.
Detroit city population in the time of the supposed renaissance:

2010 713,777 −25.0%
Est. 2016 672,795 [5] −5.7%
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Old 07-09-2017, 01:09 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,819 posts, read 5,211,356 times
Reputation: 5259
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt Marcinkiewicz View Post
Detroit city population in the time of the supposed renaissance:

2010 713,777 −25.0%
Est. 2016 672,795 [5] −5.7%
But, if you zoom out and look at the big picture, you will find this is the smallest decrease in over 50 years.

1960 1,670,144 −9.7%
1970 1,514,063 −9.3%
1980 1,203,368 −20.5%
1990 1,027,974 −14.6%
2000 951,270 −7.5%
2010 713,777 −25.0%
Est. 2016 672,795 [5] −5.7%

Even comparing to 2010 is not really fair. Detroit has really been making the largest strides over the last 3-5 years. The yearly statistics show it is continuing to slow.

Detroit city, Wayne County
Total population April 1, 2010: 713,777
Total population July 1, 2011: 704,135
Total population July 1, 2012: 698,558
Total population July 1, 2013: 689,596
Total population July 1, 2014: 679,903
Total population July 1, 2015: 676,336
Total population July 1, 2016: 672,795
Numeric change '15 - '16: - 3,541
Percent change '15 - '16: -0.50%


And Metro Detroit, which has never lost population, is growing more quickly than it has in 50 years.

1950 3,016,197 —
1960 3,762,360 24.7%
1970 4,307,470 14.5%
1980 4,353,365 1.1%
1990 4,482,299 3.0%
2000 4,752,557 6.0%
2010 5,196,250 9.3%
Est. 2017 5,992,060 15.3%
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Old 07-09-2017, 02:09 PM
 
4,490 posts, read 2,676,874 times
Reputation: 4104
No, that sounds like a different set of boundaries for 2017.

The city seems like it's in the middle of a turnaround. The foundation for health seems to be greatly improved, even while the symptoms continue.
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