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Old 08-03-2017, 08:55 AM
 
Location: Tampa - St. Louis
1,090 posts, read 1,630,581 times
Reputation: 1517

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluecarebear View Post
The middle class won't move back because of the poverty, poor school districts, increased crime, and high taxes.
The problem with your argument is that it seems if you are framing this as a new phenomenon. What you are describing happened years ago and crime in cities is going down not up. Also high taxes are not exclusive to cities, many posh suburbs also have high property taxes to pay for thos "good" schools.
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Old 08-04-2017, 11:47 AM
 
Location: Seattle
416 posts, read 248,804 times
Reputation: 1006
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rothwells mum View Post
People with children generally live in the suburbs as Detroit hasn't hit family friendly yet -its still great to hang out on a day trip with your kids though. However, it does have a great deal of young people (20-30 crowd) and wealthy retirees buying up new upscale developments.
So what doesn't make it family friendly?
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:05 PM
 
Location: Seattle
416 posts, read 248,804 times
Reputation: 1006
Quote:
Originally Posted by animatedmartian View Post
Detroit, compared to its suburbs, is still more expensive to live in all things equal. It's easy to find neighborhoods in the city where crime is low and if you don't have kids then you don't really worry about schools, but if everything else is equal, taxes are higher, cost housing is usually either the same or higher, and even car insurance is way higher.

Not only that, but something like 50% of Detroit residents commute to a job in the suburbs. If you don't work downtown, or some small factory, you probably have a job outside of Detroit. What then is the incentive for living in the city? Certainly, I believe Detroit is a great city that could be even greater if it's flaws were fixed. It'd be cool to live downtown and be able to walk everywhere, but I don't make downtown money. My job is also 45 minutes away in the opposite direction.
So basically you are saying that the city doesn't have enough jobs, the schools aren't good enough for families (although areas are safe enough for kids), and there aren't enough amenities to make it worth while to live in the city.

Sorry but my definition of great city isn't a place that has terrible schools, not enough jobs, higher taxes and expensive housing with a high crime rate. Also, I'm not buying that it's more expensive to live in Detroit than the suburbs. I would buy that it isn't as pleasant though. The data tells a story of Detroit being cheaper than the suburbs.


According to City Data, it has a lower than average cost of living:
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Detroit: 87.2 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)

Cheaper than the suburbs:
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Livonia: 89.5 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Troy: 90.4 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Novi: 91.2 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Rochester: 90.7 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Warren: 89.1 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)
Mar. 2016 cost of living index in Romulus: 87.9 (less than average, U.S. average is 100)

Before someone accuses me of being a jerk who has outdated ideas about Detroit, I know it is improving, but this idea that Detroit is just like any other city, but you know, there's a few problems-- well that is delusional. And I think it is reflected in the fact that most of the boosters do not live in the city.

Also, according to the Detroit Free Press, the city lost population again.
New Census data show Detroit's population decline continues

So yes, it is improving, but there is a very serious resistance to moving there, as the data shows. And it's not because it's more expensive.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:09 PM
 
Location: Seattle
416 posts, read 248,804 times
Reputation: 1006
Quote:
Originally Posted by goat314 View Post
1. How many American cities can you name thay are truly socialist?

2. What you described, which was described as "white flight" has already happened in a very large number of American cities

3. Many cities with high costs of living are seeing a lot of growth. Many cities with a low cost of living are in decline. It's called supply and demand.
Seattle has a socialist city council member, and at least one socialist running for another city council seat. So there are some socialists in cities. Of course, our Socialist lives in a big house in a fancy neighborhood, and her ex husband made all his money at Microsoft, so you know, of the people.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,215,137 times
Reputation: 7205
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Obviously you haven't been to the city in over ten years! And you sound like the typical Detroit hater that has moved away, lol.
The city is booming, and more than just DT and a stadium. Many areas are improving through the city, as are services. Lots or new construction and tones of renovations happening. DT is full of new stores, offices, new residential, restaurants, clubs and new public spaces. Residential vacancy rates are near zero DT.
Obviously a lot of the outer residential areas are still struggling, but the city is the healthiest it's been in decades and it's future looks super bright to anyone who is actually in the know!

https://detroit.curbed.com/maps/detr...ws-development
danielj72 is, I believe, a native Detroiter. I lived there for 14 years and have, in my own way, a slight fondness for the place. I would love to see Detroit prosper once more, and I think it actually could one day. Who knows? Heck, in 50 years, Detroit could become one of the most thriving, successful cities in the US.

But danielj is absolutely right. Yes, there has been progress in the city of Detroit, but I've only been gone from it for 6 years, and I know it was going to need a LOT more time than that to become "booming." If it happens, it will take decades.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:54 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,215,137 times
Reputation: 7205
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
You're either in denial, promoting an agenda or just clueless. Detroit is very much on the rebound and the investment in major infrastructure projects by private investment is staggering with many already completed and a few already now underway such as the Woodward Avenue Light Rail system.

https://detroit.curbed.com/2016/3/30...nt-dan-gilbert
Tough, Cheap, and Real, Detroit Is Cool Again | National Geographic
That's great if Detroit is on the rebound. Go Detroit! But don't overstate your case. Detroit has a loooong way to go, and only the people who ARE in denial think otherwise.
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Old 08-04-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, IN
571 posts, read 844,745 times
Reputation: 399
Quote:
Originally Posted by citylove101 View Post
Oh Puh-leeze. The problems in Detroit happened because of two overarching reasons:


A) The morons who ran the Big Three couldn't figure out how to make cars good enough to rival the Japanese automakers. What's worse, The Big Three figured that they didn't even have to try to compete with the Japanese. And by the time they figured it out they did, and how to do it, it was too late for Detroit. That's not the UAW's fault. That's management's fault, plain and simple.
Build quality is only part of it. They increased the quality a little, but the Japanese cars were head and shoulders above the U.S. The import quotas that were increased since the 80's allowed the foreign automakers to export many more vehicles here. It gave us more choices as consumers to go Toyota, Honda, etc.. so the Big 3 numbers went down, and Detroit was in trouble.
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Old 08-04-2017, 05:41 PM
 
2,025 posts, read 2,357,909 times
Reputation: 1961
Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
That's great if Detroit is on the rebound. Go Detroit! But don't overstate your case. Detroit has a loooong way to go, and only the people who ARE in denial think otherwise.
No one in cities like Detroit denies there are problems. Heck, I live in Gary, Indiana But there is no denying that trajectory is a very important phenomenon in the life of cities. Detroit's is on the up, and way up from where it had been. Gary is 10 years behind, basically we aren't going down any further, stabilization has begun, and investment is commencing. I see nothing to halt the continuing revitalization of both cities.
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Old 08-04-2017, 06:07 PM
 
36 posts, read 23,088 times
Reputation: 45
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakebarnes View Post

So yes, it is improving, but there is a very serious resistance to moving there, as the data shows. And it's not because it's more expensive.
The region has population gains and the city gets thousands of new residents in the core, there is no "resistance" lots of people want to be in the city. The census numbers are skewed because their methodology takes into account demolition permits when the city is going through it's blight removal program so it's not an accurate indicator of population trends. Even if those numbers were accurate they're some of the smallest loss rates the city has had in awhile.

Detroit is poised to become a regional “growth node”
https://www.citylab.com/equity/2017/...n-2040/534876/

Report: Tech jobs, Millennial population growing in Detroit area
https://detroit.curbed.com/2017/8/4/...lenial-detroit

Metro Detroit Unemployment Rate Sees Largest Drop In U.S., Now Lower Than Boston, L.A. And New York
Metro Detroit Unemployment Rate Sees Largest Drop In U.S., Now Lower Than Boston, L.A. And New York

And it is true that Detroit doesn't face issues any different than any other city in America did/does.
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Old 08-04-2017, 07:03 PM
 
2,035 posts, read 1,029,337 times
Reputation: 2682
Quote:
Originally Posted by jakebarnes View Post
Seattle has a socialist city council member, and at least one socialist running for another city council seat. So there are some socialists in cities. Of course, our Socialist lives in a big house in a fancy neighborhood, and her ex husband made all his money at Microsoft, so you know, of the people.
I believe Milwaukee is the only city to have had 3 socialist mayors. Now, Democrats run the city.
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