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Old 07-03-2017, 08:28 PM
 
Location: Kansas City, MISSOURI
9,013 posts, read 2,744,380 times
Reputation: 6946

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Phoenix. But not for another 30 years or so. Or maybe Las Vegas.

All of the other cities people have mentioned here have already gone through their own "Detroit" era and have mostly bottomed out and are starting to look better.
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Old 07-03-2017, 09:22 PM
 
Location: Somewhere extremely awesome
3,035 posts, read 2,467,343 times
Reputation: 2319
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
If you think building some stadiums and developing a small area in the downtown is a renaissance you may be a bit naive. I have not seen the place in over 10 years admittedly but the level of decay I saw there can never be undone. Much of it is abandoned, much of it looks to not even be in the first world. Unless the population has been replaced, broken infrastructure replaced, corruption cleaned up and the falling down buildings cleared it can not really be that different than it was then. It is by far the worst city in the USA, one of the worst in all of North America (yes that means I am comparing it to Mexico) We Americans should work to avoid seeing any other US city meet Detroits fate. Detroit is like a ship broken on the rocks, it stands as a warning to all, Do not go this way.
I'm guessing that L. Brooks Patterson is your hero.

Detroit looks first world, by the way. Blighted, yes, but there are normal houses and traffic lights and whatnot.
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Old 07-04-2017, 12:04 AM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,319 posts, read 6,983,961 times
Reputation: 3504
Well you could say St Louis, Buffalo or Cleveland but I think all three are on the upswing and probably passed the tipping point of backsliding. Perhaps the Space Coast, but even they seem to be on the rebound now and seeing promising reinvestment.

What happened to Detroit was quite extreme and I'm not sure we'll see anything like it anytime soon.
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Old 07-04-2017, 12:28 AM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,431,779 times
Reputation: 11220
Las Vegas is the closest thing to a one-industry city which could suffer greatly if that industry went bust, and it did suffer greatly in the great recession due to loss of tourism, but I'm not sure what happened to US auto manufacturing will be replicated anywhere else to that extent. Detroit also had a lot of social factors which led to its decline, not just the economy. It was built intentionally segregated between white and black, that powder keg exploded in 1968, and the city was never the same after.
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Old 07-04-2017, 06:22 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,502 posts, read 1,356,358 times
Reputation: 1723
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
If you think building some stadiums and developing a small area in the downtown is a renaissance you may be a bit naive. I have not seen the place in over 10 years admittedly but the level of decay I saw there can never be undone. Much of it is abandoned, much of it looks to not even be in the first world. Unless the population has been replaced, broken infrastructure replaced, corruption cleaned up and the falling down buildings cleared it can not really be that different than it was then. It is by far the worst city in the USA, one of the worst in all of North America (yes that means I am comparing it to Mexico) We Americans should work to avoid seeing any other US city meet Detroits fate. Detroit is like a ship broken on the rocks, it stands as a warning to all, Do not go this way.
Obviously you haven't been to the city in over ten years! And you sound like the typical Detroit hater that has moved away, lol.
The city is booming, and more than just DT and a stadium. Many areas are improving through the city, as are services. Lots or new construction and tones of renovations happening. DT is full of new stores, offices, new residential, restaurants, clubs and new public spaces. Residential vacancy rates are near zero DT.
Obviously a lot of the outer residential areas are still struggling, but the city is the healthiest it's been in decades and it's future looks super bright to anyone who is actually in the know!

https://detroit.curbed.com/maps/detr...ws-development
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Old 07-04-2017, 06:43 AM
 
5,629 posts, read 6,104,266 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saybanana View Post
chicago. I keep hearing people are leaving because of crime. And the only good part is a neighborhood called a loop and a miracle mile.
.
lol.
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Old 07-04-2017, 06:59 AM
 
176 posts, read 191,620 times
Reputation: 134
Long-term (ish):

Las Vegas is the best candidate. It has the highest % of projected job loss from automation (which of course will hurt every metro) and heavily depends of tourism (meaning it's screwed when a recession hits) plus is already borderline unsuitable for human habitation.

Orlando and Phoenix are pretty high up as well, for the same reasons

In terms of the next Rust Belt and automation the Piedmont South could be hurt as well. Places heavily dependent on manufacturing, tax subsidies and cheap labor like Greenville, Knoxville and Chattanooga
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Old 07-04-2017, 07:09 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
Reputation: 19655
Quote:
Originally Posted by North 42 View Post
Obviously you haven't been to the city in over ten years! And you sound like the typical Detroit hater that has moved away, lol.
The city is booming, and more than just DT and a stadium. Many areas are improving through the city, as are services. Lots or new construction and tones of renovations happening. DT is full of new stores, offices, new residential, restaurants, clubs and new public spaces. Residential vacancy rates are near zero DT.
Obviously a lot of the outer residential areas are still struggling, but the city is the healthiest it's been in decades and it's future looks super bright to anyone who is actually in the know!

https://detroit.curbed.com/maps/detr...ws-development
Spot on however the stereotypes run deep and haters love to cling to them, so sometimes it's just not worth the effort.
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Old 07-04-2017, 07:14 AM
 
21,207 posts, read 30,420,192 times
Reputation: 19655
Quote:
Originally Posted by MetroZetro View Post
Long-term (ish):

Las Vegas is the best candidate. It has the highest % of projected job loss from automation (which of course will hurt every metro) and heavily depends of tourism (meaning it's screwed when a recession hits) plus is already borderline unsuitable for human habitation.

Orlando and Phoenix are pretty high up as well, for the same reasons
I agree and have long argued much of the growth seen in both cities isn't sustainable over the long haul given it's based primarily on lower wage service sector jobs in cities where the income to rent ratios continue to widen negatively. The current average one bedroom in Orlando rents for $1125 per month and the Per Capita income is 26K per year and Median Household Income is just 41K per year. Another recession/housing bubble like 2007-2010 could be catastrophic...
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Old 07-04-2017, 08:04 AM
 
4,925 posts, read 1,842,527 times
Reputation: 4669
Hartford, CT

Like Detroit, it experienced a mass exodus of the middle class in the preceding decades. Despite all the high paying white collar insurance jobs downtown in the shining modern buildings, the city is mostly inhabited by the poor. All the office workers hightail out of the city each evening after work. City is surrounded by many wealthy suburban communities. The defacto downtown and nightlife destination for the area's white collar crowd is actually in the neighboring suburban town of West Hartford.
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