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Old 07-03-2017, 03:12 PM
 
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Are people encouraged to show loyalty or pride to their city or state, even from childhood? Do you get annoyed by it sometimes, particularly if you don't think your home city or state is really that great?

Sometimes whenever any of my family that grew up here has moved out-of-state, I felt a kind of sense of envy and longing for another part of the country. When I was 6 or 7 years old, my mom would talk to us about how she wanted to live in California when she was younger, but she eventually decided to stay settled where she is in our homely state (Pennsylvania). While growing up, we even sang a song on long road trips (mostly visiting my aunt and cousins when they still lived in New Jersey) and teachers even made us sing the song in school at some point. It was a song about the 50 states, and toward the end of singing it, they would say "and the best state is... [state name]!" I didn't really have any opinion about it back then, but today looking back on it, it seems kind of annoying and preachy.


Especially because our city/state is different now than it was when my mom was a kid or young adult (even though my mom lived in Florida for a short time and moved back). Pennsylvania no longer has the economic opportunity it once had. A formerly industrial state, we have been left behind some other parts of the country, especially our part of the state. It's just not a state that is booming with jobs or young people my age. This doesn't really want to change in the future. Displaying group loyalty to it is overrated. If there was actually a wide economic boom, especially on the western side of PA, I might show a at least a little more confidence in this place.

My mom grew up where we were raised and still live today, so do few of her siblings (both her and dad were the youngest in their families). One of her sisters eventually moved 2 hours south of us when she moved out, not much of a long drive there. One of her other sisters has lived in a few different states (grew up with my mom here, lived in ???, lived in Florida, lived in NJ, and moved back to a different part of the state she originally grew up in with my mom).
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Old 07-03-2017, 03:27 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Nothing wrong with it as long as yer not a prick about it. Like the people that think New York or California are the only places worth living and everywhere else is too boring or sucky.
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Old 07-06-2017, 01:00 AM
 
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There's a lot of Texas pride in Texas and its taught to youngsters too.
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Old 07-06-2017, 08:05 AM
 
Location: I is where I is
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Nothing wrong with it as long as yer not a prick about it. Like the people that think New York or California are the only places worth living and everywhere else is too boring or sucky.
I moved from Southern Indiana to California almost 2 ago, and it's actually funny that all Californians actually do think this. But when you have peopke like myself, and many other people in the construction industry here for work, we all severely dislike it.

To each their own of course, but you're spot on
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Clovis Strong, NM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C24L View Post
There's a lot of Texas pride in Texas and its taught to youngsters too.
As much as Californian's and Texan's like to take pot-shots at each other, it's safe to say that there isn't anything different about them when it comes to state pride. Both too large, too full of people, and too full of themselves.
I shudder when people suggest for me to either move back to CA, or take a job some place in TX. Better to be forgotten here in NM where the only place that seems to matter to anyone out of state is Santa Fe.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:20 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
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It is an interesting question, but it may run deeper. I think there is a built-in idea that where you were born and raised is extremely important to an individual and it tends to last a lifetime. Human nature, perhaps at its best. That said, if someone is born in an area and moves before they can remember it, that connection is lost.

I will use myself as an example. Born at Swedish Hospital in Seattle in 1959, spent my life in Seattle until 1990. Today, I have no desire to live in Seattle, but I still have a strong feeling about the city, with sports, with economic growth, with the skyline, etc. I think this is part of our brain wiring more than anything else. We still connect to where we came from, and probably will to our death. I don't think this is abnormal, in fact, it is indeed quite normal.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:57 PM
 
Location: South Florida for now
236 posts, read 182,557 times
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I spent most of my life here in South Florida.
I know I should be proud of and loyal to my roots, but I just don't feel a connection to the people, the culture, climate, etc. It's just not for me, I'm not a beach bum.
In my few recent trips to Wyoming, I felt a vague connection to the culture of that state. I also felt a connection to New Mexico and Maine, albeit for different reasons.
Let's say you were born in small-town Missouri, but you were always an outcast there and you're of progressive political persuasions. You don't have to be loyal to your hometown. You have every right to get up on your two feet and move to a community that suits you... like Austin, Texas. Or even somewhere beyond US borders, if that "somewhere" is up your alley. No one is forcing you to salute the flag of the county/state/city you were raised in.
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Old 09-16-2017, 05:27 AM
 
Location: Idaho
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What about those born in DC, Guam, Puerto Rico, etc.? They are not states or cities!

But to answer your question on states and/or cities, I have absolutely NO loyalty to MI (or the worthless city) where I was born, and no loyalty to any other state or city I have lived in. A state is just borders and a name on my license plates, driver's license, etc.

My loyalty is with America, which is comprised of 50 states, a district and territories, not one particular state.
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Old 09-16-2017, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
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I definitely think some people are like this, but not everyone. I think it's perfectly acceptable for somebody to feel the opposite way and hate where you grew up though. Speaking for myself, I have a lot of hometown pride and would not ever want to live anywhere else in America. But that has less to do with the fact that I'm from here and more to do with the fact that I just really love it here (NYC) and there really is no other city like it in America. The only other place in the US I could possibly see myself living is maybe Miami, but I would only do it if I wanted a complete change of life. I'm sure I would miss NYC a lot though. For the record I have lived away for about 5 years or so in far suburban NJ, about an hour away from NY near Philly, and I wasn't happy with the suburban life at all. Philly was a cool city, but I much prefer NY. I couldn't wait to move back, and that's exactly what I did.


As far as States go, I don't think it's as important. State borders are pretty much imaginary lines. The real purpose for States are for law, politics, taxes, regulations, licensing etc. State pride I never really understood. If I live in NYC, I don't really care much for places like Syracuse, Buffalo, Plattsburgh, etc. I don't feel a connection to them at all. I'd rather move to Jersey City, and I'd feel more at home there than either of those places. I guess I do like my State, but I don't really care that much about which areas and cities hundreds of miles away that the imaginary lines group me in with. Especially when there are closer, more similar places within separate imaginary lines (NJ, CT, etc). Actually I wouldn't mind at all if NYC region broke off from Upstate NY and we just went our separate ways. I'm sure the people Upstate wouldn't mind either. Actually I think I'd prefer that. I do think Upstate NY is very beautiful though, and very underrated/overlooked nationally, maybe Niagara Falls being the exception.
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Old 09-16-2017, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FL_Watch View Post
I spent most of my life here in South Florida.
I know I should be proud of and loyal to my roots, but I just don't feel a connection to the people, the culture, climate, etc. It's just not for me, I'm not a beach bum.
In my few recent trips to Wyoming, I felt a vague connection to the culture of that state. I also felt a connection to New Mexico and Maine, albeit for different reasons.
Let's say you were born in small-town Missouri, but you were always an outcast there and you're of progressive political persuasions. You don't have to be loyal to your hometown. You have every right to get up on your two feet and move to a community that suits you... like Austin, Texas. Or even somewhere beyond US borders, if that "somewhere" is up your alley. No one is forcing you to salute the flag of the county/state/city you were raised in.
Feel the same way. Grew up in S. FL but TX and MN feel more like home to me. I'd rather claim to be from FL than from Miami as I like the rest of the state more than that city. I still claim it as my hometown but I am glad I left. Only visit for family. Once or twice a year is enough. I could totally get behind Texas or Minnesota State pride. Both states have more state pride than Florida does. In fact, Florida gets a lot of internal flack. Meanwhile most of the people hating on Texas are smug liberals who never been there, or look down on the south in general. And the only dish people got against Minnesota is how cold it is, not realising we have three other seasons besides winter. Meanwhile Florida seems to be adored by people because they think living there is like vacationing, but those who know better think differently.

Honestly I feel FL would be a lot nicer if it wasn't so overcrowded and didn't experience massive population growth. I still wouldn't stay tho cuz the weather is soul sucking to me!
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