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Old 07-06-2017, 03:19 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906

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Why not let the OP make up his own mind? I simply made a suggestion. I don't think that he's going to move here only because 1 stranger on the internet suggested it for consideration. The climate data is easy to find on the internet. I've linked to it so it doesn't make sense for people to say I'm trying to deceive because I like Greenville.

I don't really see the point in suggesting places up north because it seems obvious that they get a lot of snow and are colder. I assumed that he was looking for something farther south and not in the mountains.

I suggested Greenville after reading his 2nd post in which he stated he wanted a place with 'a snowstorm'. Greenville typically gets 2-3 snowstorms.

As I've pointed out, Greenville is near Blue Ridge mountains and plenty of snow in the mountains in the winter.

It is 63 miles south of Asheville, the coldest and snowiest larger metro in the southeast. It is also 3 hours to Boone NC which has several ski slopes.

The suggestions of NYC, Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis, Syracuse, Madison, Cleveland, etc seem a lot colder and snowier than what he is looking for but nobody commented on that. I didn't feel the need to debate the people who made those suggestions which includes Badger Films.

The mean temperatures of those cities are in the lower 70s in the summer months. People down south could say that isn't really summer. It is all relative but I wouldn't say those northern cities don't have 4 seasons.

Greensboro / Winston Salem NC and Roanoke Va are two other ideas and they get more snow than Greenville but aren't as cold as Asheville due to lower elevation.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 07-06-2017 at 03:53 PM..
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Old 07-06-2017, 04:22 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Depends on what you want out of the city but for 4 seasons with clearly defined snowy winters;
Minneapolis, MN
St. Paul, MN
Madison, WI
Milwaukee, WI
Des Moines, IA
Omaha, NE
Chicago, IL
Ann Arbor, MI
Cleveland, OH
Pittsburgh, PA
Syracuse, NY
Boston, MA
Syracuse is the snowiest city in the United States according to several lists that I've looked at. It looks like all of those except maybe Omaha are in the top 25 snowiest or close to it.
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Old 07-06-2017, 04:28 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,059 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Why not let the OP make up his own mind? I simply made a suggestion. I don't think that he's going to move here only because 1 stranger on the internet suggested it for consideration. The climate data is easy to find on the internet. I've linked to it so it doesn't make sense for people to say I'm trying to deceive because I like Greenville.

I don't really see the point in suggesting places up north because it seems obvious that they get a lot of snow and are colder. I assumed that he was looking for something farther south and not in the mountains.

I suggested Greenville after reading his 2nd post in which he stated he wanted a place with 'a snowstorm'. Greenville typically gets 2-3 snowstorms.

As I've pointed out, Greenville is near Blue Ridge mountains and plenty of snow in the mountains in the winter.

It is 63 miles south of Asheville, the coldest and snowiest larger metro in the southeast. It is also 3 hours to Boone NC which has several ski slopes.

The suggestions of NYC, Boston, Chicago, Minneapolis, Syracuse, Madison, Cleveland, etc seem a lot colder and snowier than what he is looking for but nobody commented on that. I didn't feel the need to debate the people who made those suggestions which includes Badger Films.

The mean temperatures of those cities are in the lower 70s in the summer months. People down south could say that isn't really summer. It is all relative but I wouldn't say those northern cities don't have 4 seasons.

Greensboro / Winston Salem NC and Roanoke Va are two other ideas and they get more snow than Greenville but aren't as cold as Asheville due to lower elevation.

You're still ignoring this part " For this thread, winter will be defined as having some snow on the ground for at least a month." Greenville does not have snow for a month. You're too focused on the snowstorm aspect. How many snowstorms does Greenville actually get? I mean a real snowstorm not just any measurable snowfall. The kind of snowstorm that "Let it snow" was singing about!

Idk how you can compare mean temps in the 70s as not real summer. 70s are still warm. And no one's saying southern cities with mean temps in the 40s don't have real winters, but for the purpose of this thread, he wants cities that have snow on the ground for at least a month.

If he doesn't want a far northern city, then lower northern cities and upper southern cities will do perfectly. St. Louis, Indianapolis, Louisville, Nashville, Baltimore, Philadelphia.

Btw you said NYC is "too snowy" but actually, it fits it perfectly, more than Greenville by a long shot. It's winters are not as cold as people think and it usually has one big snowstorm each year. And by snowstorms I mean SNOWSTORMS.
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Old 07-06-2017, 04:29 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
He never said he wanted to live in a super snowy place.

I think my 3 suggestions are closer to what he is looking for. He said 'a snowstorm' in his 2nd post. That doesn't sound like Syracuse to me. For whatever reason, you keep ignoring his second post, even after I've pointed it out several times and quoted from it.

This list has Syracuse as 5th snowiest city in the world. https://www.indy100.com/article/the-...ld--lJNYCcDRig

I've seen Cleveland up there, like top 3 in the United States.

I think Greenville and my other two suggestions, Roanoke and Greensboro / Winston Salem are much better than your suggestions, based on my interpretation of what the OP said. Roanoke and Gboro get more snow than Gville and little colder in the winter.

Again, I have no problem with you suggesting those cities but you've been mocking my suggestion of Greenville and implied that I am being misleading because I like Greenville. I at no point asserted Greenville is as snowy and cold as places like Syracuse and Madison. For me, a pro of Greenville is it has warmer winters and less snow than cities like the ones you listed.

You appear to be from one of those northern states, so you think the weather up there is the 'norm' and the basis of a 4 season climate. Greenville is a 4 season climate. It is not Florida.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 07-06-2017 at 04:55 PM..
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Old 07-06-2017, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,138,052 times
Reputation: 7505
There are probably many places with all four seasons, but maybe a better question is a place with a "balance" of those seasons. Where I live now, there are definitely four seasons, but winter and summer dominate. There's barely any spring and fall. It'd be nice to have a balance of the seasons, if that's possible (maybe not).
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Old 07-06-2017, 07:09 PM
 
35 posts, read 18,021 times
Reputation: 30
Philadelphia has the perfect geographic location and probably climate as well since all four seasons are mild.

Boston winter's are way too much in comparison. Sorry.

Spring, summer and fall are great in both cities though. Both metros really.
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Old 07-06-2017, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Sector 001
7,242 posts, read 6,460,994 times
Reputation: 8290
Rapid City, SD.

4 distinct seasons, plenty of snow if you drive into the black hills, chinook winds bring winter relief so it's not really cold all the time, the snow that does fall will melt due to these winds. Not much humidity, not as many bugs.

Alternately, Denver, CO or eastern CO in general would fit this qualification. The western great plains (Wyoming, Montana, western South Dakota and Nebraska, and eastern Colorado) have the best 4 seasons climate in the county.

If you like more snow and humidity and like it green vs brown, western Michigan, along lake Michigan, or eastern WI. The lake water prevents really bitter air like they get in South Dakota, MN, and Northern WI, and the lake effect snow gives a lot of snow throughout the winter. Milwaukee, WI metropolitan area would be a good choice, particularly Ozaukee County. If you want spring and fall, definitely Michigan and Wisconsin. (the southern half of these states), closer to lake Michigan the better since the lake water helps even out the temps. There is not much lake effect snow on the west side of lake Michigan, mostly you get lake enhancement during storms when the low pressure system goes southward leading to easterly winds off the lake.
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Old 07-06-2017, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,059 posts, read 3,379,100 times
Reputation: 7700
Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
He never said he wanted to live in a super snowy place.

I think my 3 suggestions are closer to what he is looking for. He said 'a snowstorm' in his 2nd post. That doesn't sound like Syracuse to me. For whatever reason, you keep ignoring his second post, even after I've pointed it out several times and quoted from it.

This list has Syracuse as 5th snowiest city in the world. https://www.indy100.com/article/the-...ld--lJNYCcDRig

I've seen Cleveland up there, like top 3 in the United States.

I think Greenville and my other two suggestions, Roanoke and Greensboro / Winston Salem are much better than your suggestions, based on my interpretation of what the OP said. Roanoke and Gboro get more snow than Gville and little colder in the winter.

Again, I have no problem with you suggesting those cities but you've been mocking my suggestion of Greenville and implied that I am being misleading because I like Greenville. I at no point asserted Greenville is as snowy and cold as places like Syracuse and Madison. For me, a pro of Greenville is it has warmer winters and less snow than cities like the ones you listed.

You appear to be from one of those northern states, so you think the weather up there is the 'norm' and the basis of a 4 season climate. Greenville is a 4 season climate. It is not Florida.
I'm actually originally from Florida myself, from Miami, the least four seasony major city besides Honolulu. I agree, Greenville is a 4 seasons climate, and I consider everywhere I have lived in Texas a 4 seasons climate, especially compared to Miami. I am moving to Minnesota in a month, but I am not from there. That will be my first time actually living in a continental climate.

Still you have to be objective. Northern climates have a better representation of "the four seasons" because they represent them in full and consistently. Summers are consistently warm and hot up north, winters are consistently cold and snowy up north. Southern seasons tend to skew in favour of summer much more than winter. Winters in the South aren't the best representation of winter as winters in the North.

I think its also important to note that OP said "At LEAST one month of snow" not "At MOST.." if it was at most you'd skew it to southern cities but at least, you skew it further north. And I agree, Syracuse is an extreme option. I'm a snow lover but they get too much for me. If OP wants the strong element of winter, the far north is better, if he wants the more moderate element of winter, the lower north/upper south is best, if he wants the more weak element of winter, much of the south except the gulf coast and Florida (plus a lot of places out west) are the best option. At least one month of snow would require a more moderate type of winter. Greenville's winters are too mild. That is literally all I'm saying. Never did I say it lacked seasons. It has just as much seasons as north Texas whether you wanna admit it or not. Though I'm sure the fall is prettier.
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Old 07-07-2017, 12:31 AM
 
75 posts, read 59,253 times
Reputation: 138
Minneapolis, Minnesota
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Old 07-07-2017, 02:14 AM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
Reputation: 2906
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Still you have to be objective. Northern climates have a better representation of "the four seasons" because they represent them in full and consistently. Summers are consistently warm and hot up north, winters are consistently cold and snowy up north. Southern seasons tend to skew in favour of summer much more than winter. Winters in the South aren't the best representation of winter as winters in the North..
This is all subjective. You are expressing your opinion and stating it is a fact. I think for a majority of people, the north is the worst version of a 4 season climate. That's is one reason why so many people are moving to the south.

Summers are more mild up north especially around the Great Lakes compared to the south.

You admit that you are a snow lover so obviously you have a bias when it comes to what is the best representation of the 4 seasons.

You keep asserting that I'm not being objective. All I said is Greenville gets some snow and it has 4 seasons. I specifically stated it gets 2 or 3 snowstorms a winter on average. All of this is true. You cannot point to one false statement that I've made but you keep asserting that I'm being misleading and not objective.

I never at any point asserted that winters in Greenville are as snowy and cold as any place up north. You are responding to a point that I never made.

I"ve also pointed out Greenville is near the Blue Ridge mountains where it snows more than Greenville. You've consistently ignored this point.

All of your suggestions were extreme choices for the US as far as cold and snow goes except maybe Omaha. I did not interpret the OP's preference as being cities that are super cold and snowy. I would think those cites you suggested have a lot more than 1 month of snow on the ground.

Greenville gets more snow and precipitation than Denton Texas. It also has more days below 32 degree F each winter month. 4-6 more days each month.

I get that you think Greenville winters are too mild. Other people think they are cold enough and are fine with the amount of snow it gets. I simply made a suggestion of Greenville for consideration. My suggestion wasn't aimed at a person like you who thinks Minnesota is an ideal place to live.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 07-07-2017 at 02:25 AM..
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