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Old 07-07-2017, 02:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I hadn't heard this. Has it been rebuilt? What areas were affected the worst? What's the prognosis for surviving future events of this kind? Have some parts of the island been declared no-build zones, like parts of Staten Island?
Long Beach in particular was one of the hardest hit areas.


it has been rebuilt but it took a very long time.


I don't know about no-build zones here.


I do not know how we will fare during the next Sandy-type event but hopefully our leaders have learned what needs to be done and can prepare the island better the next time.
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Old 07-08-2017, 01:29 AM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
15 years on from Katrina and New Orleans is still down 20% from its pre Katrina population.
While Chicago,San Francisco, and Atlanta were all pretty much destroyed at one time or another they didn't have the same population drop as New Orleans and the surrounding parishes did post-Katrina.

The rules are it must be 1 event (not a 40 year process like deindustrialization or the Great Migration). It can be up or down (e.g. The immediate catalyst for a boom or bust).

Galveston 1900 seems to be the closest analog.

And on the flip side the opening of the Erie Canal made Buffalo Triple in size in 5 years.
Baton Rouge boomed somewhat as a side effect of Katrina has many New Orleans transplants arrived here and stayed.

There is a lot phenomenal growth in Williston, North Dakota because of the oil boom in the Bakken Shale. As in 400 or 500% growth I believe in the past 5 years. I wonder how many people left New York after 9-11.

I believe there are parts of Los Angeles that still haven't recovered from the Rodney King riots.
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Old 07-08-2017, 11:50 AM
 
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Hurricane Andrew in 1992 where ultimately due to catastrophic damage 230K people moved from Miami-Dade County to Broward County.
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Old 07-08-2017, 01:58 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Well, probably the most extreme example is Galveston. It used to be the biggest city in Texas. I really wonder how it and Houston would have grown together. It may be like another DFW scenario. It's cool to speculate.
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Old 07-08-2017, 02:17 PM
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Location: Ohio
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Katrina was unusual, in that it caused the resettlement of tens of thousands of people with very low incomes. Those folks were in bad shape financially and couldn't have afforded to relocate themselves. Once they were relocated, they didn't have means to return, nor were the places they used to live habitable enough to return to. I'm not aware of a forced resettlement of that scale happening anywhere else in the US in the last 100 years.
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Old 07-08-2017, 04:43 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
Katrina was unusual, in that it caused the resettlement of tens of thousands of people with very low incomes. Those folks were in bad shape financially and couldn't have afforded to relocate themselves. Once they were relocated, they didn't have means to return, nor were the places they used to live habitable enough to return to. I'm not aware of a forced resettlement of that scale happening anywhere else in the US in the last 100 years.
Yea most of the people displaced are extremely poor and for a lot of them, there wasn't really anything to go back to. So many neighbourhoods were just completely ruined and there's only so much rebuilding that went on in some areas. For many people Though there's many different cases for different people. My friend is a New Orleans native and black, and was relocated to Texas with his family after Katrina. He's financially very well off, and was back in New Orleans as well. This thread prompted me to ask him if he would return; he said no. He said there's too much segregation in the city among a lot of other issues and feels more at home in Texas. But he proudly claims the city as his hometown and his Louisiana roots.
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Old 07-08-2017, 05:04 PM
 
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The Civil War has affected many American cities but in particular, the male population of the USA. I heard, the male population numbers still have not recovered from the War.
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Old 07-09-2017, 07:00 AM
 
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There have been a great number of fires that have done damages.
There are alot more here going back to BC dated
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fires

1990 – Happy Land fire The deadliest arson fire, and the deadliest nightclub fire, in New York City history. 87 killed, 6 injured.
1991 – Kuwaiti oil fires following the Persian Gulf War
1991 – Oakland Hills firestorm kills 25 and destroys 3469 homes and apartments
1993 – A tsunami and fires occurred at Okushiri Island, Japan following the July 12 Hokkaidō earthquake, with 645 houses lost and 202 people killed.
1995 – Great Hanshin earthquake with fire, Kobe, Japan
1996 – 1996 Pat Sin Leng wildfire, Pat Sin Leng, Tai Po, Hong Kong; 5 (3 pupils and 2 teachers) killed on February 10[25]
1996 – Garley Building fire, the deadliest building fire in Hong Kong's history; 41 deaths, 81 injuries.
21st century Edit
2000s Edit
2002 – Lagos armoury explosion causes fire which killed at least 1,100 people
2002 – Edinburgh Cowgate fire, Scotland, 150 people fled their homes but there were no injuries[33]
2002 – Rodeo-Chediski fire
2003 – Canberra bushfires fire that killed 4 and destroyed over 500 homes
2003 – Cedar Fire, San Diego largest ever California brush fire that killed 15 and destroyed 2,232 homes.
2003 – The Station nightclub fire fire that killed 100.
2006 – Day Fire, Los Angeles and Ventura counties in California.
2007 – 2007 Greek forest fires, large fire in Greece
2008 – Camden Market Fire, which caused severe damage to one of North London's most famous shopping districts.
2009 – February Black Saturday Bushfires – Victoria, Australia, 173 deaths
2009 – Kenyan oil spill ignition kills at least 111.
2010s Edit
2010 – 2010 Dhaka fire kills 117 people in the Nimtali area of Old Dhaka, Bangladesh
2011 – Devastating fire in Manila, Philippines[34] leaves about 8,000 people homeless and 9 injured in a Makati City squatter community.
2012 – Hurricane Sandy: A six-alarm fire caused by hurricane damage destroyed 121 homes in Breezy Point, Queens, New York.
2012 – Tarzeen Fashions factory fire, Bangladesh kills 112 people.
2013 – Yarnell Hill Fire: Over 13 square miles, destroyed over 100 homes,[35] and 19 members of the Granite Mountain Hotshots were killed in action[36]
2013 – Lac-Mιgantic derailment: Over 30 buildings in the town centre were destroyed in a train derailment, explosion and fire which caused 46 confirmed deaths.[37][38] The fire made the event the deadliest train accident in Canada's history since 1864[39]
2013 – Boardwalk fire in Seaside Heights & Seaside Park, New Jersey, U.S.A. At least 19 buildings destroyed, 30 businesses lost, no major injuries[40]
2014 – Valparaνso wildfire in Chile – wildfire destroying several areas of Valparaνso, Chile killing at least 13 people
2014 – Lahore supermarket fire in Pakistan – in Anarkali Bazaar, Lahore. The fire killed at least 13 people[41]
2015 – Tianjin Port fire and explosions August 12, killing at least 173 people, damaging 300 buildings and over 10000 vehicles. Fire set off two major explosions and numerous secondary detonations.
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Old 07-09-2017, 09:29 AM
 
483 posts, read 422,384 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gtt99 View Post
The Civil War has affected many American cities but in particular, the male population of the USA. I heard, the male population numbers still have not recovered from the War.
I'm afraid this doesn't make sense. Everyone from the 1860s is dead and babies are born roughly 50/50 male/female. So how are their fewer men today as a result of the Civil War? I'm sure the Civil War did greatly affect many American cities, though.
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Old 07-09-2017, 10:51 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,591 posts, read 70,482,002 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bo View Post
Katrina was unusual, in that it caused the resettlement of tens of thousands of people with very low incomes. Those folks were in bad shape financially and couldn't have afforded to relocate themselves. Once they were relocated, they didn't have means to return, nor were the places they used to live habitable enough to return to. I'm not aware of a forced resettlement of that scale happening anywhere else in the US in the last 100 years.
I mentioned this earlier, but NM received quite a few Katrina survivors, but most of them eventually went back. The few who stayed have done well here, and like it here.

There's an interesting, but little-known story in the overall Katrina disaster. The Lower Ninth Ward had a Vietnamese community that was ruined, along with the rest of the Lower Ninth. But the Vietnamese are used to pulling together to overcome adversity, so they helped each other rebuild their homes. They made their corner of the Lower Ninth habitable again, without FEMA help. Fascinating.
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