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Old 07-06-2017, 09:12 AM
 
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15 years on from Katrina and New Orleans is still down 20% from its pre Katrina population.
While Chicago,San Francisco, and Atlanta were all pretty much destroyed at one time or another they didn't have the same population drop as New Orleans and the surrounding parishes did post-Katrina.

The rules are it must be 1 event (not a 40 year process like deindustrialization or the Great Migration). It can be up or down (e.g. The immediate catalyst for a boom or bust).

Galveston 1900 seems to be the closest analog.

And on the flip side the opening of the Erie Canal made Buffalo Triple in size in 5 years.
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Old 07-06-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Cbus
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Obviously 9/11 in Lower Manhattan was much more concentrated than Katrina in the Gulf Coast/Nola but it certainly affected New York.
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Old 07-06-2017, 11:40 AM
 
Location: TOVCCA
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The Great Depression--very few not affected financially
The Attack on Pearl Harbor--very few not affected psychologically
World War II--very few not affected by loss of life, rationing
The Post WWII Baby Boom--very few not affected by increased manufacturing, growth of middle class, home ownership
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Old 07-06-2017, 11:58 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Obviously 9/11 in Lower Manhattan was much more concentrated than Katrina in the Gulf Coast/Nola but it certainly affected New York.
I meant in raw numbers, 20% of New Orleans left and never came back. Similar depopulation happened in Plaquemines Parish as well.
9/11 didn't make people leave NY.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:02 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Buckeye614 View Post
Obviously 9/11 in Lower Manhattan was much more concentrated than Katrina in the Gulf Coast/Nola but it certainly affected New York.
Not only 9/11, but Hurricane Sandy, was it? It affected Staten Island's population; there are areas of the island, I understand, that will never be rebuilt or repopulated, because they're too low, and the storm-surge potential is too high. I don't know about other areas of NYC--the Rockaways, and so forth. I think some communities are under the impression they can build a barrier to keep the sea out. With sea level rising as the Greenland ice sheet shrinks daily, not to mention Antarctica, that would be a supreme folly and waste of resources.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:05 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
15 years on from Katrina and New Orleans is still down 20% from its pre Katrina population.
While Chicago,San Francisco, and Atlanta were all pretty much destroyed at one time or another they didn't have the same population drop as New Orleans and the surrounding parishes did post-Katrina.

The rules are it must be 1 event (not a 40 year process like deindustrialization or the Great Migration). It can be up or down (e.g. The immediate catalyst for a boom or bust).

Galveston 1900 seems to be the closest analog.

And on the flip side the opening of the Erie Canal made Buffalo Triple in size in 5 years.
San Francisco DID have a population drop after the earthquake/fire, but it was only temporary. It's such a popular city, that new residents came in after the city was rebuilt. SF families relocated themselves to the East Bay after the fire. Berkeley and Oakland gained quite a few residents, as a result.

My city in NM noticed an influx of Katrina refugees after the disaster. A few have stayed on, and have stable employment. Most returned to New Orleans, though, as soon as they could.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:15 PM
 
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What about the July 1967 riots in Detroit? Would that count?

Detroit went from experiencing the typical declines of every major city in the 1960s to a complete free fall. It lost 250k people from 1967 to 1970 alone. Insurance companies stopped insuring homes in the city, banks stopped issuing mortgages.
It gave the working population of the city every incentive to abandon it even more. It caused an almost complete collapse of the tax base that wasn't fixed until the 2014 bankruptcy. While not a natural disaster people contribute this one event to the collapse of the city more than anything else. Unlike the metros who went through 40 years of de-industrialization it's metropolitan area continued to gain population.
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Old 07-06-2017, 12:51 PM
 
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I guess maybe the 80's and 90's oil bust in Houston, Texas.They were building lots of office buildings for all these companies thinking West Texas Intermediate was going up forever but it busted instead.I hear 1986 was real bad.A lot of people owed so much money so they just walked away from their homes.
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Old 07-06-2017, 01:38 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Not only 9/11, but Hurricane Sandy, was it? It affected Staten Island's population; there are areas of the island, I understand, that will never be rebuilt or repopulated, because they're too low, and the storm-surge potential is too high. I don't know about other areas of NYC--the Rockaways, and so forth. I think some communities are under the impression they can build a barrier to keep the sea out. With sea level rising as the Greenland ice sheet shrinks daily, not to mention Antarctica, that would be a supreme folly and waste of resources.
Yes Sandy caused a lot of devastation to the NYC area and some areas still have not been repaired yet and won't be for a long time if ever.


Long Island was also massively destroyed, not just Staten and the boros.
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Old 07-07-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdawg8181 View Post
Yes Sandy caused a lot of devastation to the NYC area and some areas still have not been repaired yet and won't be for a long time if ever.


Long Island was also massively destroyed, not just Staten and the boros.
I hadn't heard this. Has it been rebuilt? What areas were affected the worst? What's the prognosis for surviving future events of this kind? Have some parts of the island been declared no-build zones, like parts of Staten Island?
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