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Old 07-13-2017, 05:34 PM
 
Location: Savannah GA
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Oh ok. Our horse tour guy in Charleston said 2nd in world, which gave us a WTF moment, but now I realize he meant country.
Don't ever trust anything a horse tour guy tells you ...
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Old 07-13-2017, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,003,555 times
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It is not historic in terms of war history and the founding of this country like many of the cities that have been already suggested, but Greenville SC has done a good job preserving and renovating a lot of old buildings including textile mill buildings.

Columbia SC has also transformed an once dormant warehouse district downtown known as the Vista into a nice nightlife / restaurant area near the state house. Columbia does have some good Civil War history and the state house and Uni of South Carolina core campus are both pretty old. UofSC is one of the oldest universities in the US, founded in 1801.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 07-13-2017 at 08:49 PM..
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:26 PM
 
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Philadelphia, pretty easily. In my experience, the colonial housing stock and history is literally everywhere. Society Hill is the largest collection in the nation, and there is loads more all over the area.

Boston would be second. They tore down most of their colonial stock.
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:29 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
Society Hill is a cool spot, but isn't it ONE of the highest concentration, not THE? I would imagine Charleston would have more.

No. Society Hill is THE largest concentration of colonial housing stock.

You need to visit Philadelphia more thoroughly. It has more than Boston.

Boston just markets itself better I guess. Beacon Hill is nice, but Philadelphia has it beat.
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Old 07-13-2017, 10:20 PM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,136 posts, read 9,907,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateBorn View Post
No. Society Hill is THE largest concentration of colonial housing stock.

You need to visit Philadelphia more thoroughly. It has more than Boston.

Boston just markets itself better I guess. Beacon Hill is nice, but Philadelphia has it beat.
If you have any proof of that I would love to see it. Plus a listing of actual numbers.

I read somewhere that Colonial Williamsburgh has about 80 or so original colonial buildings while Schenectady and Kingston in Upstate New York have about 40 each. Or is that just in their stockade districts? I don't remember. There are probably other cities with large concentrations of colonial buildings.

Anyway, if you going to mention Boston and Philadelphia, you should also mention the city between them, which has more historic landmarks then any other. New York has entire neighborhoods with hundreds of buildings that were built in the late 1800s and earlier.
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Old 07-13-2017, 11:37 PM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,295 posts, read 3,510,480 times
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While not a 'city,' we discovered Amesbury, MA on a visit to New England last month.

This very cool town was once the 'Carriage Capital' of the world, and it's about 3 miles west of Newburyport and 40 miles north of Boston. It straddles the junction of I-95 & I-495, just south of the New Hampshire border.

They have a very urban little Downtown, with old mills along a rushing river that have been restored into lofts and offices. Very friendly people and several cool pubs, combined with amazing Newburyport next door will definitely bring us back.

Amesbury City Old Postcards

https://newengland.com/today/travel/...massachusetts/
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:03 AM
 
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Beaufort, SC mentioned? More of a large town than a city I guess but is preserved just as well, if not better than Charleston or Savannah.
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:05 AM
 
571 posts, read 390,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
New Orleans and St. Augustine.

I have to disagree with New Orleans. In a rush to modernize, NOLA actually bulldozed a lot of its colonial French architecture. There's hardly nothing left.


Surprisingly, the largest collection of authentic French colonial architecture in the U.S. is in Sainte Genevieve, Missouri. --It's even recognized by the National Register of Historical Places.


See
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EfRn9Et7fqo&t=191s
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Old 07-14-2017, 06:36 AM
 
Location: Paradise
2,456 posts, read 2,009,319 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
If you have any proof of that I would love to see it. Plus a listing of actual numbers.

I read somewhere that Colonial Williamsburgh has about 80 or so original colonial buildings while Schenectady and Kingston in Upstate New York have about 40 each. Or is that just in their stockade districts? I don't remember. There are probably other cities with large concentrations of colonial buildings.

Anyway, if you going to mention Boston and Philadelphia, you should also mention the city between them, which has more historic landmarks then any other. New York has entire neighborhoods with hundreds of buildings that were built in the late 1800s and earlier.


I worked at Colonial Williamsburg, they have 88 original buildings.
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Old 07-14-2017, 09:46 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,136 posts, read 9,907,336 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lunetunelover View Post
I worked at Colonial Williamsburg, they have 88 original buildings.
And many recreations of colonial buildings on their original plots. There are also other colonial and early 1800s buildings in the surrounding areas.

What makes Colonial Williamsburg so unique is that modern things like automobiles and telephone wires have been removed, so you can get a closer experience to what life was like back then. It is amazing how wide the roads look and how open everything is when you do not cars parked all over the place.
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