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Old 07-22-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Center City
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New Castle Delaware is often compared to Williamsburg, with the key difference being that it is an actual town where people go about their business as compared with a museum with hours of admission and a fee to enter: Visiting New Castle - City of New Castle - New Castle County Delaware.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s3McbVN-Aqw
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Old 07-22-2017, 08:56 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I love Colonial Williamsburg! And I also like the modern town of Williamsburg as well. It too has lots of historic buildings that are still intact or rebuilt. I'd love to live in that area but wow, it's so expensive!

I love Yorktown too. What a view - and so much history. And it is completely open to the public. People really do live there.

One thing that blew my mind was the house and property in Yorktown where Cornwallis surrendered. It's a national park and is completely free to wander around in and on. The house is empty but intact and there's one park ranger that hangs around downstairs but visitors are free to roam as they wish. It is a beautiful but sad place.
Yes, I was surprised by Yorktown the first time I went back there as an adult! The town had quite a number of old buildings and is on a hill that slopes down to a pretty wide river. Sort of reminded me of parts of the North Shore of Long Island overlooking the LI Sound. Last time we were there we stopped at a restaurant that was a house from the early 1700s. Not only was it historic but the food was pretty good as well.
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Old 07-22-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,682 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Y'all are forgetting that there's a whole lot more to Williamsburg than just the living museum part - there's actually a town of Williamsburg where real people live real lives without paying any admission! You can walk around in it, enjoy it, live in it, go to school and work in it...and there's a lot of great historical architecture there as well. For instance - William and Mary College.
William & Mary

Merchant's Square:
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attracti..._Virginia.html

Many more too. But the whole area is so full of history that you're practically stumbling over historical buildings and homes every few blocks. Much of the area is in a nature preserve as well, so it's very pristine.

Another historical area I really enjoy visiting is Concord, MA. I think I may have mentioned that town already. So many historical buildings and homes in such a small footprint.
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Old 07-22-2017, 09:05 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,682 posts, read 36,118,702 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Yes, I was surprised by Yorktown the first time I went back there as an adult! The town had quite a number of old buildings and is on a hill that slopes down to a pretty wide river. Sort of reminded me of parts of the North Shore of Long Island overlooking the LI Sound. Last time we were there we stopped at a restaurant that was a house from the early 1700s. Not only was it historic but the food was pretty good as well.
I love me some Yorktown. Actually if I could just pick up and move anyplace I wanted in the world, it would probably be to Yorktown.
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Old 07-22-2017, 09:06 AM
 
Location: On the Great South Bay
7,130 posts, read 9,899,963 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
New Castle Delaware is often compared to Williamsburg, with the key difference being that it is an actual town where people go about their business as compared with a museum with hours of admission and a fee to enter: Visiting New Castle - City of New Castle - New Castle County Delaware.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=s3McbVN-Aqw
Interesting about New Castle but I have never been there so I cannot say.

One thing I have noticed is that it is often easier to get a historic feeling in a smaller city or town then it is a big city. Maybe because they are still closer in size to what they were years ago while the big city has changed more drastically.
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Old 07-22-2017, 10:15 AM
 
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Albany NY was settled 1614 and incorporated in 1686. Some historic districts: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sout...toric_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mans...toric_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Past...toric_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cent...toric_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Down...toric_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbo...roeck_Triangle

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clin...bany,_New_York)

Also, info on the Stockade areas of Kingston and Schenectady in NY: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/King...ckade_District

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stoc...toric_District
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Old 07-22-2017, 01:42 PM
 
Location: Center City
6,850 posts, read 7,795,643 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LINative View Post
Interesting about New Castle but I have never been there so I cannot say.

One thing I have noticed is that it is often easier to get a historic feeling in a smaller city or town then it is a big city. Maybe because they are still closer in size to what they were years ago while the big city has changed more drastically.
In general, I agree. In the case of Philadelphia, however, there are historically intact neighborhoods situated right in the middle of a vibrant city.


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr5MKMEPU3E


https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=v9ObdkAKtsg
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Old 07-24-2017, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,332 posts, read 10,298,159 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
That's because there's a lot more to both cities than just architecture.

Lol at the same applies for Philadelphia in a huge way.
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Old 07-24-2017, 11:14 PM
NCN
 
Location: NC/SC Border Patrol
21,135 posts, read 21,875,914 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
New Orleans and St. Augustine.
New Orleans has just paid out big money to have historical monuments removed. I would disqualify any city that acts in such an immature way.
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Old 07-25-2017, 01:52 AM
 
Location: R.I.
970 posts, read 603,310 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateBorn View Post
No. Society Hill is THE largest concentration of colonial housing stock.

You need to visit Philadelphia more thoroughly. It has more than Boston.

Boston just markets itself better I guess. Beacon Hill is nice, but Philadelphia has it beat.
I have to disagree with you. A number of years back I worked for the Preservation Society of Newport County (R.I), and through the efforts of this organization, Operation Clapboard, and the Newport Restoration Foundation The Point section of Newport has the largest collection of Colonial Homes in the country.

Easy enough to verify this information by a Google search.
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