U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-14-2017, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,011 posts, read 639,316 times
Reputation: 2035

Advertisements

I concur and would go so far as to say that the above-referenced Intermountain West cities feature more greenery than the vast majority of cities in Southern California, the Central Coast and the Central Valley.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-17-2017, 01:34 PM
 
Location: East of the Sun, West of the Moon
15,504 posts, read 17,720,777 times
Reputation: 30796
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
The region has a lot of sun, wind and open land. It would position well in the alternative energy future.
Good point. However, depending on how the technology develops, how much of the region will be used for alternative energy and how much population would that industry support?

For what its worth, I read yesterday that Elon Musk claimed that with current technology the energy needs of the entire United States could be served by 100 square miles of solar panels. Sounds like a lot until you superimpose that over a map.

Of course the panels would be distributed as well, not centrally located.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-17-2017, 01:43 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 1,111,397 times
Reputation: 679
Boise , it will become the new destination for the generation that gets priced out of the Colorado front range cities and for the people who want to live close to the wilderness but still live in a large city .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-18-2017, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque, NM
706 posts, read 513,054 times
Reputation: 407
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
Good point. However, depending on how the technology develops, how much of the region will be used for alternative energy and how much population would that industry support?

For what its worth, I read yesterday that Elon Musk claimed that with current technology the energy needs of the entire United States could be served by 100 square miles of solar panels. Sounds like a lot until you superimpose that over a map.

Of course the panels would be distributed as well, not centrally located.
A 10x10 mile square seems entirely feasible, especially here in the west.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-19-2017, 09:18 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,254 posts, read 1,631,010 times
Reputation: 2893
I think overall the region will do very well compared to a majority of the country.

The region in general has had some of the highest rates of economic and job growth in the country for a long time and I don't see that changing.

The region is not for all but I do think there is a large amount of the population that really would want to move to the region if they were relocating or visiting.

Seems like mountain terrain is getting more and more popular when people consider moving. The rest is also close to the major cities on the West Coast.

I think in the big cities of the region domestic in-migration will increase and there will an increase in young families and also retirees.

The region in general doesn't have the amount of social disorder and polarization that exists in the rest of the country. The region seems to have a rather high quality of life with community relations being good.

Salt Lake City and the Wasatch Front has a huge light and commuter rail system, excellent university campuses in each metro area and it is extremely clean and is way above it's weight when it comes to what they has to offer as far as entertainment, economy and infrastructure.

The larger metropolitan areas such Salt Lake City, Boise and Reno have excellent economies, nice scenery and lots of growth.

I do know that Salt Lake City, Boise and Reno have had a huge increase in housing costs. The region has traditional been affordable but has had a large increase in housing prices.

The region in general has relatively low taxes with good public services and infrastructure for the amount of tax paid. Except for Nevada and Washington they have state income tax but the property taxes and sales taxes tend to be very reasonable compared to much of the country.

I do think some of the smaller metropolitan areas will likely be more economically stagnant with lower job growth but with very reasonable housing costs. The smaller metropolitan areas of the region I think could do well with retirees and people who work remotely.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2017, 12:11 AM
 
2,545 posts, read 1,634,457 times
Reputation: 2029
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovecrowds View Post
I think overall the region will do very well compared to a majority of the country.

The region in general has had some of the highest rates of economic and job growth in the country for a long time and I don't see that changing.

The region is not for all but I do think there is a large amount of the population that really would want to move to the region if they were relocating or visiting.

Seems like mountain terrain is getting more and more popular when people consider moving. The rest is also close to the major cities on the West Coast.

I think in the big cities of the region domestic in-migration will increase and there will an increase in young families and also retirees.

The region in general doesn't have the amount of social disorder and polarization that exists in the rest of the country. The region seems to have a rather high quality of life with community relations being good.

Salt Lake City and the Wasatch Front has a huge light and commuter rail system, excellent university campuses in each metro area and it is extremely clean and is way above it's weight when it comes to what they has to offer as far as entertainment, economy and infrastructure.

The larger metropolitan areas such Salt Lake City, Boise and Reno have excellent economies, nice scenery and lots of growth.

I do know that Salt Lake City, Boise and Reno have had a huge increase in housing costs. The region has traditional been affordable but has had a large increase in housing prices.

The region in general has relatively low taxes with good public services and infrastructure for the amount of tax paid. Except for Nevada and Washington they have state income tax but the property taxes and sales taxes tend to be very reasonable compared to much of the country.

I do think some of the smaller metropolitan areas will likely be more economically stagnant with lower job growth but with very reasonable housing costs. The smaller metropolitan areas of the region I think could do well with retirees and people who work remotely.
As long as their is adequate water, the region should grow well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2017, 04:49 AM
 
Location: In the hot spot!
3,399 posts, read 4,798,465 times
Reputation: 3201
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nn2036 View Post
As long as their is adequate water, the region should grow well.
This will be the key!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-22-2017, 09:56 AM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,297,032 times
Reputation: 3204
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gantz View Post
Also, this region is expected to become even drier because of climate change. That can't be good for a region that is already considered to be relatively dry.
Idaho already has more water than most western states that have larger populations. Boise may only get about a foot of rain a year, but thanks to the mountains I don't expect it to go dry any time soon.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top