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Old 07-13-2017, 03:31 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Minneapolis may have a reputation as a Yuppie boutique city, but most city neighborhoods are actually blue collar (and St Paul even more so). In Minneapolis and St Paul proper the working class areas are the most integrated parts of the city. White working class people tend to grow up around and immersed in black culture. Also, the cities' bohemian/countercultural thing is rooted in the working class, which is probably a relic of the region's socialist past. I work as a chef so most of my crew is local working class (or immigrant). Most of the white working class kids who work for me are big into underground music and have a pretty mixed group of friends.

In cities like NY, Seattle, Portland, the Bay Area, etc. it seems like the counterculture comes from the middle and upper middle class while working class whites tend to be more conservative. In the Twin Cities it is the opposite, in my experience.

This sound pretty interesting because bohemianism is not at all associated with being working class . Do young working class white people in Minneapolis tend to be more into contemporary underground styles ( like indie and alternative ) or old ones ( like metal and punk ) ? Or is it more of a mix ? Also how do they get along with so called hipsters ?
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Old 07-14-2017, 12:55 AM
 
Location: Naples Island
1,016 posts, read 642,534 times
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Believe it or not, there is still a sizable number of working-class white folks living in the Lakewood/East Long Beach area. This is very surprising because non-Hispanic whites have long-been a minority in Los Angeles County -- probably longer than any other major population center in the country.
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Old 07-14-2017, 09:46 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis
2,331 posts, read 3,056,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
This sound pretty interesting because bohemianism is not at all associated with being working class . Do young working class white people in Minneapolis tend to be more into contemporary underground styles ( like indie and alternative ) or old ones ( like metal and punk ) ? Or is it more of a mix ? Also how do they get along with so called hipsters ?
It is mostly punk and underground hip hop. Rhymesayers is based in Minneapolis and has had a huge impact on the youth culture of the city. Atmosphere and Brother Ali were as big in the '00s as Prince and the Replacements were in the '80s. Since the '80s the cities' music vibe has always circled around punk and funk and their derivatives, and the new stuff that has come out of that. They seem to get along with stereotypical hipsters. Minneapolis is not a conflict driven city.
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:01 PM
 
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N.E Philly, Dundalk MD and parts of Pittsburgh could be considered "white ghetto's"
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Old 07-14-2017, 08:11 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
What is poor/working class urban white culture like in the South , Plains States , and West by the way ? You don't really hear about urban poor/working class whites in those areas which is why I'm asking .

Well for the South the accent is twangier. Though the majority of poor white folks in the South live in the country.
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Old 07-14-2017, 08:16 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,390,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drewcifer View Post
Minneapolis may have a reputation as a Yuppie boutique city, but most city neighborhoods are actually blue collar (and St Paul even more so). In Minneapolis and St Paul proper the working class areas are the most integrated parts of the city. White working class people tend to grow up around and immersed in black culture. Also, the cities' bohemian/countercultural thing is rooted in the working class, which is probably a relic of the region's socialist past. I work as a chef so most of my crew is local working class (or immigrant). Most of the white working class kids who work for me are big into underground music and have a pretty mixed group of friends.

In cities like NY, Seattle, Portland, the Bay Area, etc. it seems like the counterculture comes from the middle and upper middle class while working class whites tend to be more conservative. In the Twin Cities it is the opposite, in my experience.

True, I was in the central neighbourhood in Minneapolis last spring and ate a local fish joint. Customers were mostly white and black blue collar. I think the manager was "ethnic white" (I hate that term, as if the English aren't an ethnicity lol) and appeared to be anything from Greek to Hungarian to Polish. Idk, he had an American accent but with some "ethnic" European influence. I dunno about most of Minneapolis but that area seemed fairly integrated. The only common tie was they all seemed working class.
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:26 PM
 
Location: The canyon (with my pistols and knife)
13,223 posts, read 17,966,293 times
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"Townies" in Pittsburgh are better known as "yinzers." The yinzer influence in the urban core has dwindled to a degree since 2000, but they're still around. The biggest yinzer concentrations in Allegheny County are as follows:


1. South Hills neighborhoods in the city, such as Brookline, Bon Air, Carrick, Overbrook, Hays, New Homestead and Lincoln Place, and the adjacent inner southern suburbs of Baldwin, Brentwood, Whitehall, West Mifflin, Munhall and Dravosburg.

2. North Side neighborhoods in the city east of I-279, such as Troy Hill, Spring Hill and Spring Garden, and the adjacent inner northern suburbs of Millvale, Sharpsburg, Etna, Reserve Township, and parts of Shaler Township.

3. West end neighborhoods in the city, such as Sheraden, Esplen and Crafton Heights, and the adjacent inner western suburbs of Crafton, Stowe Township and Kennedy Township.

4. Boroughs and townships up the Allegheny River Valley, such as Harmar Township, Cheswick, Springdale, Tarentum and Brackenridge.

5. Boroughs and townships up the Monongahela River Valley, such as East Pittsburgh, Turtle Creek, North Versailles, White Oak, Port Vue and Glassport.


In general, you're more likely to find yinzers in the eastern half of Allegheny County than you are in the western half. The eastern half of the county is more blue-collar and working-class (the East End of the city of Pittsburgh being a glaring exception), and the western half is more white-collar and professional.
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Old 07-15-2017, 07:09 AM
 
100 posts, read 62,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Craziaskowboi View Post
"Townies" in Pittsburgh are better known as "yinzers." The yinzer influence in the urban core has dwindled to a degree since 2000, but they're still around. The biggest yinzer concentrations in Allegheny County are as follows:


1. South Hills neighborhoods in the city, such as Brookline, Bon Air, Carrick, Overbrook, Hays, New Homestead and Lincoln Place, and the adjacent inner southern suburbs of Baldwin, Brentwood, Whitehall, West Mifflin, Munhall and Dravosburg.

2. North Side neighborhoods in the city east of I-279, such as Troy Hill, Spring Hill and Spring Garden, and the adjacent inner northern suburbs of Millvale, Sharpsburg, Etna, Reserve Township, and parts of Shaler Township.

3. West end neighborhoods in the city, such as Sheraden, Esplen and Crafton Heights, and the adjacent inner western suburbs of Crafton, Stowe Township and Kennedy Township.

4. Boroughs and townships up the Allegheny River Valley, such as Harmar Township, Cheswick, Springdale, Tarentum and Brackenridge.

5. Boroughs and townships up the Monongahela River Valley, such as East Pittsburgh, Turtle Creek, North Versailles, White Oak, Port Vue and Glassport.


In general, you're more likely to find yinzers in the eastern half of Allegheny County than you are in the western half. The eastern half of the county is more blue-collar and working-class (the East End of the city of Pittsburgh being a glaring exception), and the western half is more white-collar and professional.
Does yinzer culture have any unique/distinctive elements ? If so then what are those elements ?
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