U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-07-2017, 11:16 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,602 times
Reputation: 59

Advertisements

There have been a few threads on this board concerning present day poor/white working class neighborhoods in urban areas , however the aim of this thread will be to discuss the culture of people who live in such neighborhoods and fit into the category of poor/working class white .


I'll start off with the issue of present day Boston Townies ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlestown_Townies ) . It's widely accepted that the present day Charlestown neighborhood of Boston has lost a great part of it's townie population , yet I assume it still has pockets of it left here and there . Has Townie culture changed over the years ? Do Irish immigrant traditions still play an important part in the culture of Townies ? If so then what are those particular traditions ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-08-2017, 07:26 AM
 
Location: Chicago, IL
3,298 posts, read 1,651,567 times
Reputation: 3558
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gene Chode View Post
There have been a few threads on this board concerning present day poor/white working class neighborhoods in urban areas , however the aim of this thread will be to discuss the culture of people who live in such neighborhoods and fit into the category of poor/working class white .


I'll start off with the issue of present day Boston Townies ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charlestown_Townies ) . It's widely accepted that the present day Charlestown neighborhood of Boston has lost a great part of it's townie population , yet I assume it still has pockets of it left here and there . Has Townie culture changed over the years ? Do Irish immigrant traditions still play an important part in the culture of Townies ? If so then what are those particular traditions ?
Chicago used to have large Polish (northwest side), Italian (near west side), Ukranian, and Irish (south side) white working class neighborhoods. They're not as characteristic as they used to be, although you can still find some of the culture/traditions of the neighborhood still there, though it's not as prominent as it used to be.

Bridgeport (a neighborhood in the south side) is probably the biggest, most characteristic white working class neighborhood remaining. Mostly police officers, firemen, and other blue collar workers; largely Irish and Italian, although demographics are changing.

Ukranian Village is still pretty working class. Lots of stores along Chicago ave are still completely in Ukranian language, so tradition has held on to an extent, but it is quickly becoming gentrified/yuppified. Little Italy/Tri Taylor neighborhood was once very blue collar Italian, but that culture/tradition is not that strong there anymore. Polish are spread out all over the city/suburbs without any dominant neighborhood anymore. Wicker Park used to be a completely Polish and Mexican, blue collar neighborhood and now is almost completely gentrified hipster.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2017, 08:38 AM
 
21,188 posts, read 30,359,201 times
Reputation: 19627
Philadelphia has a very sizable "townie" population still holding on in neighborhoods like Fishtown, Port Richmond, Kensington, pretty much all of Northeast Philadelphia, Manayunk and Roxborough...all of which is rooted in what is historically poorly educated, blue collar Irish and East European though a large chunk of South Philly still offers up the Italian version as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2017, 02:45 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,735 posts, read 6,139,094 times
Reputation: 3590
Baltimore has a townie population in the southwestern, North Central sections of Baltimore. The latter is gentrifying, though, so they won't be around much longer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2017, 05:40 PM
 
Location: Coastal Connecticut
15,378 posts, read 19,137,364 times
Reputation: 3595
The more "remote" as sections of the outer boroughs in NYC house some areas like this. Mostly with a strong ethnic presence established a few generations back that just never moved.

New Haven has this in Wooster Square, which was always nice but is now attracting the hipster crowd. Also Morris Cove and Lighthouse Point.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-08-2017, 06:20 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,602 times
Reputation: 59
Are there any cultural traits that distinguish poor/working class urban white people from their rural counterparts in 2017 ? Like ( f.ex ) is there a style of music that poor/working class white people in urban areas are more likely to listen to ? Do many of them tend to dress a certain way ? Also how closely do ethnic people of this category hold on their roots ? I know that the ability to speak a foreign language has mainly eroded among members of the post WW2 generations , but have other traditions survived ? Is it common for poor/working class ethnic white people in urban areas to eat their ancestral cuisine , celebrate their ancestral holidays , and so forth ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-10-2017, 11:32 PM
 
100 posts, read 62,602 times
Reputation: 59
What is poor/working class urban white culture like in the South , Plains States , and West by the way ? You don't really hear about urban poor/working class whites in those areas which is why I'm asking .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2017, 01:31 AM
 
11,456 posts, read 6,578,118 times
Reputation: 6091
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stylo View Post
The more "remote" as sections of the outer boroughs in NYC house some areas like this. Mostly with a strong ethnic presence established a few generations back that just never moved.

New Haven has this in Wooster Square, which was always nice but is now attracting the hipster crowd. Also Morris Cove and Lighthouse Point.
The only part of NYC that I think might have a lot of working class whites is Staten Island, but even then I'm pretty sure most white people on Staten Island make a decent living. And the areas I'm thinking of aren't even urban, even though they're part of NYC.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2017, 09:47 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,860,994 times
Reputation: 5855
Quote:
Originally Posted by l1995 View Post
The only part of NYC that I think might have a lot of working class whites is Staten Island, but even then I'm pretty sure most white people on Staten Island make a decent living. And the areas I'm thinking of aren't even urban, even though they're part of NYC.
What about Bay Ridge and Bensonhurst in Brooklyn?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-11-2017, 09:49 AM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,860,994 times
Reputation: 5855
Quote:
Originally Posted by personone View Post
Chicago used to have large Polish (northwest side), Italian (near west side), Ukranian, and Irish (south side) white working class neighborhoods. They're not as characteristic as they used to be, although you can still find some of the culture/traditions of the neighborhood still there, though it's not as prominent as it used to be.

Bridgeport (a neighborhood in the south side) is probably the biggest, most characteristic white working class neighborhood remaining. Mostly police officers, firemen, and other blue collar workers; largely Irish and Italian, although demographics are changing.

Ukranian Village is still pretty working class. Lots of stores along Chicago ave are still completely in Ukranian language, so tradition has held on to an extent, but it is quickly becoming gentrified/yuppified. Little Italy/Tri Taylor neighborhood was once very blue collar Italian, but that culture/tradition is not that strong there anymore. Polish are spread out all over the city/suburbs without any dominant neighborhood anymore. Wicker Park used to be a completely Polish and Mexican, blue collar neighborhood and now is almost completely gentrified hipster.
Doesn't Canaryville still have a sizeable working class Irish population?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top