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Old 07-10-2017, 06:19 AM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,819 posts, read 5,213,742 times
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Chiming in regarding Detroit- I feel it is almost generational. People in their 20s and 30s mostly appreciate the city and love spending time there. Older generations, 50+, tend to fear it. They haven't been there in many years and have no desire to go. They don't realize that it has improved drastically over the last few years.
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Old 07-10-2017, 06:50 AM
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Status: "Feeling suspicious" (set 7 days ago)
 
805 posts, read 415,851 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Detroit. Suburbanites don't even acknowledge the city. If you ask someone from say, Farmington Hills or Sterling Heights or Livonia where they're from, they'll most likely say "Michigan". And if you ask, "Oh, where in Michigan?" they'll probably say "southeast Michigan". Then ask, "Detroit?" and they'll likely say, "well, outside of Detroit", as if their totally embarrassed to associate with the city.

There are plenty of city bashers in the St. Louis metro, but when they go out of town, almost all of them will proudly say they're from St. Louis.

One observation I've made about Detroit and Cleveland vs. St. Louis is that Detroiters and Clevelanders seem to claim their states proudly. There seems to be a lot of Michigan and Ohio pride (respectively) in those cities and residents of those cities proudly identify with their state. On the other hand, St. Louisans really have no love for the state of Missouri, and "Missouri pride" is not a thing at all. I think Kansas City identifies more closely with the state of Missouri, but St. Louis and its immediate suburbs seem very detached from the state. Fine by me.
I'd strongly disagree that Kansas City "identifies more closely" with Missouri than St. Louis. It always seemed the other way around to me. They might be the same in that respect at best.
Perhaps what you're thinking of is that people on the Missouri side are quick to correct someone who makes the assumption that KC is in Kansas. That's the extent of their Missouri pride..... all while wearing a Jayhwaks shirt.
To the topic at hand: people in the Kansas suburbs often leave out the "City" in Kansas City, and will just refer to that county they live in first and foremost.
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Old 07-10-2017, 11:34 AM
 
Location: Lake Spivey, Georgia
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As a native Atlantan who grew up in the southside suburbs, I can honestly say that I don't know ANYONE who denounces the City of Atlanta. Some may roll their eyes at "liberal policies", but most find Atlanta to be the brave and beautiful city she is (despite many rough edges that most, if not all large cities possess). In fact, I feel that most people in Metro Atlanta, myself included LOL, have fallen victim to Atlanta's endless boosterism. Y'all know that hometown Delta Airlines had a giant billboard on the Downtown Connector for years: "Over 200 flights a day as if anyone would ever want to leave Atlanta". We all fell for it hook, line, and sinker! ;0)
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Old 07-10-2017, 11:44 AM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
11,145 posts, read 14,140,873 times
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Definitely Hartford, CT.
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Old 07-10-2017, 12:01 PM
 
Location: SF Bay Area
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Oakland gets ragged on from both the suburbs and city (SF). But it also has a lot of defenders/people who like it now too.
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Old 07-10-2017, 12:10 PM
 
Location: Nashville TN, Cincinnati, OH
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Cincinnati vs the Suburbs same deal in Cleveland, Detroit, Baltimore, St. Louis, a lot of other cities as well
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Old 07-10-2017, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Pleasant Ridge)
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Yup, as others have said in Cincinnati it's pretty bad. I think because the city is changing fast and becoming more progressive and more urban. There's an old guard that feel like they're losing their Cincinnati. It once considered one of America's most conservative cities (google Mapplethorpe Art Trial) where today even the head of Hamilton County Republican party has stated a few times that there aren't many republicans left in the city, I think Trump won only 20% of the vote. Now it sure seems like a lot of suburbanites openly root for the city to fail.
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Old 07-10-2017, 06:26 PM
 
Location: Kennedy Heights, Ohio. USA
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The way the suburban metropolitan residents in the Midwest hate their city to the extent that they are jubilant at any negative news concerning the city is just the flip side of the coin of how anti-Trump people loathe Donald Trump. Its easy to rejoice at the destruction of a group of people if you have an intense emotional detestation of the political policies they support.
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Old 07-10-2017, 06:42 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,826 posts, read 12,342,051 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BigCityDreamer View Post
But people like going to the Inner Harbor, Fells Point and downtown among other places.

There's a sharp distinction between the nice areas and the high crime areas where nobody goes.
When I lived in Baltimore County for many years, people in my neighborhood only went downtown occassionally for sporting events or special ocassions to go clubbing around Power Plant. Many suburbanites stick to Towson and White Marsh when going out. Most of my friends who still live in Maryland prefer going out in Towson more so than downtown. Also there is also resentment about the city taking a lot of state tax money and having nothing to show for it. Baltimore City is actually a perfect example about no matter how much money you pump into Democrat liberal social programs nothing really changes. And people have avoided the city even more since the riots.

One city with a rough reputation that is still quite loved by its suburbanites is New Orleans, though New Orleans isn't quite as completely crime ridden as Baltimore or Detroit.
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Old 07-10-2017, 08:08 PM
 
17 posts, read 8,787 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by STLgasm View Post
Detroit. Suburbanites don't even acknowledge the city. If you ask someone from say, Farmington Hills or Sterling Heights or Livonia where they're from, they'll most likely say "Michigan". And if you ask, "Oh, where in Michigan?" they'll probably say "southeast Michigan". Then ask, "Detroit?" and they'll likely say, "well, outside of Detroit", as if their totally embarrassed to associate with the city.

There are plenty of city bashers in the St. Louis metro, but when they go out of town, almost all of them will proudly say they're from St. Louis.

One observation I've made about Detroit and Cleveland vs. St. Louis is that Detroiters and Clevelanders seem to claim their states proudly. There seems to be a lot of Michigan and Ohio pride (respectively) in those cities and residents of those cities proudly identify with their state. On the other hand, St. Louisans really have no love for the state of Missouri, and "Missouri pride" is not a thing at all. I think Kansas City identifies more closely with the state of Missouri, but St. Louis and its immediate suburbs seem very detached from the state. Fine by me.

This was very true about Detroit up until around 10 years ago. Prior to 2008, suburban Detroiters in general wanted nothing to do with the city. But times have changed.

There has been an almost 180 degree turn on this over the last decade. Yes, there are still a handful of old crusties who have the same hate, but the vast majority of people from the region are now proud to say "Detroit." And yes, the city still has it's problems, but what the term "Detroit" embodies in 2017 is much different than 2007. People are now excited about all of the positive changes in the city and region, and as such, most Metro Detroiters are now almost proud to say they are from Detroit, as it has become perceived as a cool thing to say.
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