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Old 07-10-2017, 05:03 PM
nei nei won $500 in our forum's Most Engaging Poster Contest - Thirteenth Edition (Jan-Feb 2015). 

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Location: Long Island / NYC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
I think it depends on the age of the city and city core as well, and how many subdivisions spring up, the cost of land, etc. For instance, in most mid size metro areas I've lived in in the South (many of them, by the way - in Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, and Texas - and Maryland if you want to include that in your version of "south"), the lot size of most suburban homes allows for spacious one story homes, and those seem to be preferred over two story homes. In fact, in the mid size Texas metro I live in currently, if your master bedroom is upstairs (or God forbid, ALL bedrooms are upstairs) that's nearly the kiss of death for resale. You can get away with a couple of kids' rooms or guest rooms upstairs but that master bedroom with an attached bathroom better be downstairs - along with one or two living areas, an office, and a spacious kitchen with plenty of dining space.
There's a lot of home on big lots in New England especially away from the large cities and not in old towns. But two story homes are the norm. Only one-story homes are ranches, but those are usually small and cheap. Two-story might be hold heat a bit better and so are more energy efficient?
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Old 07-10-2017, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's a lot of home on big lots in New England especially away from the large cities and not in old towns. But two story homes are the norm. Only one-story homes are ranches, but those are usually small and cheap.
My brother lives in Ohio and it's the same there - mostly two story homes even on bigger lots.

I outlined the most common reasons I heard for the preference for one story homes here in Texas in a post a few posts up.
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Old 07-15-2017, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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I noticed that some areas in Twin Cities suburbs (like Eagan) have a lot of one-storey ranch homes, but within Minneapolis and Saint Paul, they're mostly two storey. Interesting..
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Old 07-16-2017, 11:02 AM
 
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The old Northeast city has mostly 2-3 stories townhouses around their cores. The new sunbelt cities mostly have one story ranches.
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Old 07-16-2017, 03:22 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
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It is pretty 50/50 here. Pre-1940s, more two story. 1940-1960s- lots of ranches, large percentage of homes built in this period. 1960s/1970s- trilevels galore. 1980s-current- probably about 80/20 in favor of two story homes.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:20 PM
 
Location: Wonderland
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nei View Post
There's a lot of home on big lots in New England especially away from the large cities and not in old towns. But two story homes are the norm. Only one-story homes are ranches, but those are usually small and cheap. Two-story might be hold heat a bit better and so are more energy efficient?
Well, that might explain why they're not as popular in the deep South and most of Texas - keeping things warm in the winter just isn't a big issue as they are in the North.

And in the summer - it's more energy efficient to cool a one story home than it is to cool a two story home. So it's more important to be able to cool a place efficiently since our "cooling" season is longer than our "heating" season.
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Old 07-16-2017, 08:49 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
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The Bay Area is mostly single-story bungalows, outside of San Francisco proper and a couple of older Victorian neighborhoods (like Lower Bottoms in West Oakland). I believe that is the case throughout most of California as well.
The Midwest, especially older neighborhoods, is mostly two-story homes.
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Old 07-21-2017, 02:39 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
The Bay Area is mostly single-story bungalows, outside of San Francisco proper and a couple of older Victorian neighborhoods (like Lower Bottoms in West Oakland). I believe that is the case throughout most of California as well.
The Midwest, especially older neighborhoods, is mostly two-story homes.
Yea, California seems to be about a fairly even mix from what I've seen.
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