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Old 07-14-2017, 02:23 PM
 
Location: DFW
6,795 posts, read 11,761,346 times
Reputation: 5148

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NativeOrange View Post
You don't need to be wealthy by any means to enjoy much better weather in California than Texas.
If you're single, sure. In fact, i recommend living near the California coast while you're still single or at least childless when you don't need good accommodations. Yeah, it's still cheaper to rent a room in Newport Beach than to rent a 3 bedroom house in rural Texas.
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:22 PM
BMI
 
Location: Ontario
7,262 posts, read 4,489,778 times
Reputation: 5593
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
No. It is the alpha state in this country.
For sure.

No other state compares, that's why it has over 38 million.

Think about that....

Add up the total population of the bottom 25 states in population
and it is LESS than the population of California!
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Old 07-14-2017, 10:40 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
6,015 posts, read 6,360,515 times
Reputation: 8281
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
For sure.

No other state compares, that's why it has over 38 million.

Think about that....

Add up the total population of the bottom 25 states in population
and it is LESS than the population of California!
No doubt about it.

It's a bit too oversaturated with people for me and I felt it reduced my QOL the years I was there but I can see why it's worth it for many.
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Old 07-15-2017, 07:04 AM
 
21,180 posts, read 30,336,326 times
Reputation: 19590
[quote=Thoreau424;48819393]First of all, the data probably shows that CO isn't the top relocation destination from those from CA. /QUOTE]

Roughly a third of the transplants arriving in Denver from 2009-2013 were from the LA Metro area, so...

Where Are Transplants Moving to Denver From? Here Are the Top 29 Places | Westword
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Old 07-16-2017, 06:13 PM
 
Location: Near L.A.
4,114 posts, read 9,224,113 times
Reputation: 3346
As far as economic robustness, Texas and New York are competitive as California, but don't come close to exceeding its GDP.

As cultural diversity goes, Texas, New Jersey, and Florida can compete with California pretty nicely. New Jersey, if I'm not mistaken, may even have a higher percentage of foreign born residents than California, but I don't think the same can be said for Texas or Florida. (Maybe I'm wrong.)

As Hispanic influence goes, only Texas and Florida can compete with California.

As climate goes, Oregon, northern Nevada and northern Arizona obviously have similarities with northern California, while southern Nevada and southern Arizona have similarities with inland southern California.

As postsecondary educational quality goes, only Massachusetts can compete.

California cities can be compared loosely, but not precisely or closely, with other cities throughout the country. San Francisco has similarities with Portland, OR and Seattle. Oakland has similarities with Tacoma and Pittsburgh. Los Angeles has similarities with Phoenix and Houston. Orange County has similarities with Dallas' north suburbs. San Diego has similarities with Denver. Sacramento has similarities with Austin and, also, Denver. Riverside perhaps has similarities with El Paso. Fresno feels like a larger Yuma, or could be argued as similar to Spokane. However, SF, Oakland, LA, OC, SD, Sactown, Riverside, and Fresno are all still in California; only Sacramento and Fresno, and potentially Riverside, could "make it" as heartland American towns, culturally speaking. SD has a lot of heartland influence because of the influence of the Marines and Navy, as most marines and sailors come from the heartland, and all the hot 20-something sorority chicks who move there from places like Indiana. However, SD's ultimately too influenced by LA to its north and Baja to its south to ever pass for being a heartland sort of town.

All in all, I don't think there's any other state quite like California. Culturally and economically, it just feels different, and functions differently, than the rest of the United States.

Last edited by EclecticEars; 07-16-2017 at 06:24 PM..
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Old 07-16-2017, 07:22 PM
 
5,405 posts, read 2,813,304 times
Reputation: 10100
Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
As far as economic robustness, Texas and New York are competitive as California, but don't come close to exceeding its GDP.

As cultural diversity goes, Texas, New Jersey, and Florida can compete with California pretty nicely. New Jersey, if I'm not mistaken, may even have a higher percentage of foreign born residents than California, but I don't think the same can be said for Texas or Florida. (Maybe I'm wrong.)

As Hispanic influence goes, only Texas and Florida can compete with California.

As climate goes, Oregon, northern Nevada and northern Arizona obviously have similarities with northern California, while southern Nevada and southern Arizona have similarities with inland southern California.

As postsecondary educational quality goes, only Massachusetts can compete.

California cities can be compared loosely, but not precisely or closely, with other cities throughout the country. San Francisco has similarities with Portland, OR and Seattle. Oakland has similarities with Tacoma and Pittsburgh. Los Angeles has similarities with Phoenix and Houston. Orange County has similarities with Dallas' north suburbs. San Diego has similarities with Denver. Sacramento has similarities with Austin and, also, Denver. Riverside perhaps has similarities with El Paso. Fresno feels like a larger Yuma, or could be argued as similar to Spokane. However, SF, Oakland, LA, OC, SD, Sactown, Riverside, and Fresno are all still in California; only Sacramento and Fresno, and potentially Riverside, could "make it" as heartland American towns, culturally speaking. SD has a lot of heartland influence because of the influence of the Marines and Navy, as most marines and sailors come from the heartland, and all the hot 20-something sorority chicks who move there from places like Indiana. However, SD's ultimately too influenced by LA to its north and Baja to its south to ever pass for being a heartland sort of town.

All in all, I don't think there's any other state quite like California. Culturally and economically, it just feels different, and functions differently, than the rest of the United States.
You forgot New Mexico.
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Old 07-17-2017, 11:16 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
979 posts, read 355,979 times
Reputation: 1194
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMI View Post
For sure.

No other state compares, that's why it has over 38 million.

Think about that....

Add up the total population of the bottom 25 states in population
and it is LESS than the population of California!


Also much of that has to do with history and geography more so than desirability. Consider, if you carved out an area on the east coast that was roughly equal in area to CA. Start just north of Boston, and it would extend down to the southern part of NC. The combined population of the Boston, NYC, Philly, Baltimore and Washington DC metro areas is approximately the same as the population of CA. This does not include, therefore any of the population of eastern VA (outside the DC metro) or NC, so this area of equal size to CA would have a substantially larger population. Had the historical development of the US been different so that there weren't a multitude of small states in the east, CA would really be nothing special in comparison.
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Old 07-17-2017, 02:22 PM
 
Location: Reading PA
174 posts, read 204,072 times
Reputation: 217
No
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Old 07-19-2017, 12:21 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 1,110,916 times
Reputation: 679
Yes the State of Boulder but without the ocean
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Old 07-20-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Willowbend/Houston
13,403 posts, read 21,182,398 times
Reputation: 10279
Quote:
Originally Posted by EclecticEars View Post
As far as economic robustness, Texas and New York are competitive as California, but don't come close to exceeding its GDP.

As cultural diversity goes, Texas, New Jersey, and Florida can compete with California pretty nicely. New Jersey, if I'm not mistaken, may even have a higher percentage of foreign born residents than California, but I don't think the same can be said for Texas or Florida. (Maybe I'm wrong.)

As Hispanic influence goes, only Texas and Florida can compete with California.

As climate goes, Oregon, northern Nevada and northern Arizona obviously have similarities with northern California, while southern Nevada and southern Arizona have similarities with inland southern California.

As postsecondary educational quality goes, only Massachusetts can compete.

California cities can be compared loosely, but not precisely or closely, with other cities throughout the country. San Francisco has similarities with Portland, OR and Seattle. Oakland has similarities with Tacoma and Pittsburgh. Los Angeles has similarities with Phoenix and Houston. Orange County has similarities with Dallas' north suburbs. San Diego has similarities with Denver. Sacramento has similarities with Austin and, also, Denver. Riverside perhaps has similarities with El Paso. Fresno feels like a larger Yuma, or could be argued as similar to Spokane. However, SF, Oakland, LA, OC, SD, Sactown, Riverside, and Fresno are all still in California; only Sacramento and Fresno, and potentially Riverside, could "make it" as heartland American towns, culturally speaking. SD has a lot of heartland influence because of the influence of the Marines and Navy, as most marines and sailors come from the heartland, and all the hot 20-something sorority chicks who move there from places like Indiana. However, SD's ultimately too influenced by LA to its north and Baja to its south to ever pass for being a heartland sort of town.

All in all, I don't think there's any other state quite like California. Culturally and economically, it just feels different, and functions differently, than the rest of the United States.
Best post of the thread. Shut it down. This is it right here.
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