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Old 07-13-2017, 08:10 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chriscross309 View Post
The majority of Americans will do the most of their vacationing in the US. In fact, many will never leave the borders of the United States in their lifetime. For reasons you stated, there is plenty to do right here at home, and many don't see the value of visiting other countries and cultures. I see the value of traveling abroad, but it is much cheaper to stay here. This country is so massive, with so many different regions, landscapes, cities, and sub-cultures that it will take a lifetime for anyone to truly explore it!
That's it in a nutshell. Most Americans don't have the passion for discovering other countries/cultures.
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Old 07-13-2017, 08:14 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I've been to Canada, Japan, Guatemala, and a whirlwind trip to Europe, but usually vacation in the US. Not only are the distances pretty vast to go abroad, but there is a lot of hassle involved.

Just last weekend, we had a family reunion in Blaine, Washington, which is a border town. We decided to fly in to Vancouver, BC and drive down to the reunion location (a distance of 48 km). The flight itself was only 2.5 hours, but we were dumbfounded at how long it took to go through customs at the airport, rent a car (they refused our US auto insurance, which had assured us that they extended coverage to Canada, and forced us to buy their own insurance), and cross the border. It actually would have been faster to fly in to Seattle and drive up from there (200 km).

On the return trip, we started counting. What with the border crossing, airport security, and customs, we were required to wait in lines and present our passports SEVEN separate times before finally getting on the plane. Who wants to go through that? I love traveling, but I can hop on a plane or get in a car and freely travel hundreds to thousands of miles in several directions in my own country with no hassle at all. So that's what we do, most of the time. As far as I am concerned, international travel is for a special long vacation once every few years. I'm not popping in and out of foreign countries for every holiday, like my German relatives.
We drive up to Vancouver a few times every year, as it's less than 3 hours from Seattle. We have never waited more than about 20 minutes at the border crossing in either direction since the first time (over an hour). It took time and research, though, to get to that point. You have to consider the time of day, day of week, which crossing, and use the WSDOT traffic app to see the wait times. I have only been to two other countries, but have been to 44 states. There is plenty more I have yet to see here in the US before considering trips to Europe or Asia, which don't really appeal to me that much anyway.
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Old 07-13-2017, 09:32 AM
 
Location: Tampa
548 posts, read 340,359 times
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I also think it depends on what part of the country you live in and access to an International Airport. Living in Florida its cheaper for me to fly to Mexico or the Caribbean than flying to the Midwest to visit family in law. I personally rather vacation outside the USA. Your dollar goes further in some of the islands and Mexico.
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Old 07-13-2017, 10:17 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
I feel sure that US citizens who live near the Canada and Mexico borders are more likely to have passports than those who live in the middle of the country. Canadians have a higher rate of passport ownership than Americans because almost all of them live with spitting distance of the border.
A lot of people along the border have NEXUS cards or enhanced drivers' licenses so we can cross the border without a passport. And take along the children's birth certificates if they are under 18.

And a lot of us aren't that inclined to go over the border these days because it's just an obnoxious process to get back into the US. Getting over to Canada is relatively easy. Getting home isn't so simple. Some of the border guards take their "war of terror" mentality way too seriously and it leaves a bad feeling with travelers. I get wanting to be safe, but I also want to get home and end my trip.

You also have to keep in mind that Windsor/Detroit is one of the busiest crossing points for this region and even when you do the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing to get around that mess, it's still a hassle.

The best crossing experience that we've had since 9-11 coming back to the US was at the Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan at the International bridge.

Then again, I miss the days when I could just hand over your normal drivers' license and not have to play 20 questions with someone who takes him or herself too seriously - and assumes that you are a criminal, not just a traveler who wants to get home.

In other countries, getting a passport is a much bigger deal than it is here.

Unless you are going outside of Mexico or Canada, most people really see a passport as a waste of time and money.

Traveling overseas simply is something that a lot of Americans simply don't do. It's not that they don't want to, but rather, a reflection of their economic reality.

For example, my dad has never been overseas. He paid for me to travel overseas when I was younger, but he's never been himself. My brother has only been overseas because of military obligations.

Overseas travel really is not an expectation or lifestyle in a lot of cases.

A lot of people along the border aren't even regular visitors to the country they live near. You just co-exist, staying on your side - doing what you are doing.
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Old 07-13-2017, 10:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
That's it in a nutshell. Most Americans don't have the passion for discovering other countries/cultures.
But how true is that really - given all the ethnic blending in the larger cities?

Living close to Dearborn (or as the Islamophobes like to call it - Dearbornistan), I don't have to go to the Middle East to have authentic Middle Eastern food and interact with people from the Middle East. (For example).

That doesn't mean that there isn't the passion to learn. It just means that there are easier and cheaper ways of doing experiencing that culture without having to travel overseas.

Granted, it isn't a 100% cultural immersion experience, but take a look around at how many people attend the ethnic heritage festivals around the country. You'll see that there are a lot of Americans who are really interested in other cultures and countries - even if they can't afford to travel there. It's not an experience where the same 5 people keep showing up to support the program(s).

Also, Libraries - great places to find free books about places that you will never be able to afford to travel to.

The issue is that people start getting caught up in their lives - family, illness, schooling, life - and traveling becomes less of a priority - especially if you can't afford much and can't save much to experience your passions.

It's a more of a cultural thing, not a lack of interest thing.
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Old 07-13-2017, 10:50 AM
 
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A majority stay within the US, but there is also a good amount of ppl that go abraod as well.

I've holidayed in Greece, Italy, Spain some summers and other Summers I've gone to Seattle, California, Colorado, etc to see the National parks. Every other Xmas I'll go to NYC too. There's a lot to see in the US, but overall a trip abroad is fun for the cultural differences, but it's a lot more time consuming and expensive.
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Old 07-13-2017, 11:45 AM
 
21,220 posts, read 30,443,839 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
But how true is that really - given all the ethnic blending in the larger cities?

Living close to Dearborn (or as the Islamophobes like to call it - Dearbornistan), I don't have to go to the Middle East to have authentic Middle Eastern food and interact with people from the Middle East. (For example).

That doesn't mean that there isn't the passion to learn. It just means that there are easier and cheaper ways of doing experiencing that culture without having to travel overseas.

Granted, it isn't a 100% cultural immersion experience, but take a look around at how many people attend the ethnic heritage festivals around the country. You'll see that there are a lot of Americans who are really interested in other cultures and countries - even if they can't afford to travel there. It's not an experience where the same 5 people keep showing up to support the program(s).

Also, Libraries - great places to find free books about places that you will never be able to afford to travel to.

The issue is that people start getting caught up in their lives - family, illness, schooling, life - and traveling becomes less of a priority - especially if you can't afford much and can't save much to experience your passions.

It's a more of a cultural thing, not a lack of interest thing.
What does ethnic blending have to do with anything? Residents of other countries don't sit home and hang out in Chinatown for example versus traveling out of their borders and also believe it or not lead busy lives just like Americans. Neither prevents nor dissuades travel like it does with Americans, who by the way are much less taxed in terms of wages. It's pretty hard not to argue for lack of interest given the advantages we possess.
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Old 07-13-2017, 11:50 AM
 
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I live in the states and I never have been out of the country.I would like to possibly go to Europe and Caribbean and maybe Japan after i get the money.
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Old 07-13-2017, 01:36 PM
 
Location: Tampa
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Only met a few people in Florida that have not left the country if you exclude Bahamas which is a hop scotch away.
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Old 07-13-2017, 02:00 PM
 
Location: San Diego
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I am 26 and have been to Europe once and India once (along with Mexico and Canada several times).
Most of my trips are within the US.... there is SO much to do and see here
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