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Old 07-19-2017, 07:17 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
In my experience visiting the Netherlands, Dutch people travel way more than just the neighboring countries around them. Loads of them come to the US, Canada, Australia, Thailand, China, etc etc. The average Dutch citizen has seen far more of the world than the average American. Trust me on that. Pretty much every European has.

No, the fact is Americans don't have an interest, and don't even have the time off if they did. And they don't really care about how much vacation time they do get. If they did, they would never vote for a particular political party which will remain un-named.
The Netherlands is 16,040 square miles, bigger than Maryland, the 42nd smallest US state, smaller than West Virginia #41. You don't have to go too far to get out of the Netherlands, or even several countries away. However, living in a touristy area as I do, I can't see I've seen loads of Dutch.

Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Slovakia, Estonia, Denmark, Switzerland, and Moldova are also in that category (between Maryland and W VA). Macedonia fits between Vermont (45) and Massachusetts (44).
Belgium fits between Hawaii (43) and Maryland (42). Slovenia fits between Connecticut (48) and New Jersey Cyprus fits between Delaware (49) and Connecticut (48). Luxembourg, Andorra, Malta, Liechtenstein, San Marino, Monaco, and Vatican City are smaller than any US state.

Russia is bigger than any US state and bigger than the US itself. Turkey fits between Alaska (#1) and Texas (#2); Ukraine and France between TX and California (#3); Spain and Sweden between CA and Montana (#4). Germany, Finland and Norway fit between MT and New Mexico (#5). And so on. So you don't have to go great distances to visit other European countries, which are all except Russia smaller than many US states, and some smaller than any US state.

https://www.thoughtco.com/countries-...y-area-1434587
States - Ranked by Size & Population - ipl2 Stately Knowledge: Facts about the United States
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Old 07-19-2017, 07:49 PM
 
2,290 posts, read 1,297,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
Americans don't really care about how much vacation time they do get.
Speak for yourself. I was born into a system that I did not ask for and had no voice in.
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Old 07-19-2017, 08:12 PM
 
2,290 posts, read 1,297,269 times
Reputation: 1520
Quote:
Originally Posted by DubbleT View Post
I would love to travel overseas, but things have never come together yet to make that possible. For me and probaly for a lot of other people with children the biggest issue is time. So many other obligations come first and time is so limited. It's expensive too, so there never seems to be enough money and enough time to do anything else. .
So one large demographic grouping-parents with small children-drops out of the picture.
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Old 07-19-2017, 09:36 PM
Status: "could've~would've~should've used 'have', not 'of'" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: A Yankee in northeast TN
10,507 posts, read 14,330,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
So one large demographic grouping-parents with small children-drops out of the picture.
Not just small children either. All through middle and high school we spent a minimum of one week of vacation time (usually 2 weeks or more) going to various out of state competitions the kids were involved in, music, sports, academic clubs, etc. Unless you work for a company with a very generous vacation policy it's really tough to get enough time off to do all tose things, let alone take a regular family vacation to some place you actually want to see, lol.
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Old 07-20-2017, 05:40 AM
 
Location: Somewhere below Mason/Dixon
6,522 posts, read 7,468,006 times
Reputation: 10927
Quote:
Originally Posted by mapleguy View Post
The latest information from the US Department Of State...


About 30 percent of US citizens hold a passport. By contrast about 70 percent of Canadians have one.


xxx.
Many Americans and Canadians hold those passports to travel back and forth over the US Canadian border. I would hardly call that foreign travel. Traveling out of country is very expensive for North Americans
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:10 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,335 posts, read 10,315,855 times
Reputation: 5410
Quote:
Originally Posted by KathrynAragon View Post
Speak for yourself. My husband and I have the interest and the time off to travel internationally so we do so - not every year but every few years. In between we go to places like Maine, and South Padre Island, and all sorts of other cool places in the US - because the US is full of interesting places to visit.

Every single time we're overseas, we are hanging out someplace and hear that familiar Texas accent - and we run across someone visiting from Texas and we all sit around and drink a beer or something. And for that matter, every time we visit Luckenbach, Texas we stumble across Europeans visiting THERE. And we drink a beer with them.

The world is an interesting place.

Well then how about supporting a national law that forces every single stingy company and business in this country to give people a decent amount of vacation time that every other first world country enjoys? Then your fellow Americans that get a paltry one or two weeks off a year could enjoy what you have. You realize many or most companies don't allow you to save up three years worth of vacation time and use it for one big vacation. They have never allowed that. If you don't use your paltry one or two weeks, you lost them the next year.

I guess you wouldn't support a national law like that cause it goes against your Texas culture and hatred of the Fed Govt: "don't mess with Texas". The result is the lousy pathetic vacation time Americans get compared to every other first world nation on the planet. Y'all are happy with that I guess.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:15 AM
 
Location: Mid Atlantic USA
12,335 posts, read 10,315,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Many Americans and Canadians hold those passports to travel back and forth over the US Canadian border. I would hardly call that foreign travel. Traveling out of country is very expensive for North Americans

You need like three or four weeks to enjoy a decent vacation abroad. But unlike other first world nations which have a national law forcing companies to give generous vacation time, we don't have that in this country and probably never will until we have a super majority in congress that supports generous vacation time. Don't hold your breath.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,297 posts, read 3,513,713 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tom77falcons View Post
I guess you wouldn't support a national law like that cause it goes against your Texas culture and hatred of the Fed Govt: "don't mess with Texas". The result is the lousy pathetic vacation time Americans get compared to every other first world nation on the planet. Y'all are happy with that I guess.
Could you possibly be more arrogant and condescending?

Never mind, we all know the answer...
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:42 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 22 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,014 posts, read 102,621,396 times
Reputation: 33082
Quote:
Originally Posted by mapleguy View Post
The latest information from the US Department Of State...


About 30 percent of US citizens hold a passport. By contrast about 70 percent of Canadians have one.


xxx.
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielj72 View Post
Many Americans and Canadians hold those passports to travel back and forth over the US Canadian border. I would hardly call that foreign travel. Traveling out of country is very expensive for North Americans
Yes, and don't most Canadians live within 100 miles of the US border? IOW, more ease of travel to the US than most Americans have to Canada.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snoopygirlmi View Post
A lot of people along the border have NEXUS cards or enhanced drivers' licenses so we can cross the border without a passport. And take along the children's birth certificates if they are under 18.

And a lot of us aren't that inclined to go over the border these days because it's just an obnoxious process to get back into the US. Getting over to Canada is relatively easy. Getting home isn't so simple. Some of the border guards take their "war of terror" mentality way too seriously and it leaves a bad feeling with travelers. I get wanting to be safe, but I also want to get home and end my trip.

You also have to keep in mind that Windsor/Detroit is one of the busiest crossing points for this region and even when you do the Port Huron/Sarnia crossing to get around that mess, it's still a hassle.

The best crossing experience that we've had since 9-11 coming back to the US was at the Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan at the International bridge.

Then again, I miss the days when I could just hand over your normal drivers' license and not have to play 20 questions with someone who takes him or herself too seriously - and assumes that you are a criminal, not just a traveler who wants to get home.

In other countries, getting a passport is a much bigger deal than it is here.

Unless you are going outside of Mexico or Canada, most people really see a passport as a waste of time and money.

Traveling overseas simply is something that a lot of Americans simply don't do. It's not that they don't want to, but rather, a reflection of their economic reality.

For example, my dad has never been overseas. He paid for me to travel overseas when I was younger, but he's never been himself. My brother has only been overseas because of military obligations.

Overseas travel really is not an expectation or lifestyle in a lot of cases.

A lot of people along the border aren't even regular visitors to the country they live near. You just co-exist, staying on your side - doing what you are doing.
We had the experience in bold crossing the border into Canada from Montana. The guy walked around our car several times, looking at the license plates, etc before he ever even talked with us. This got DH's dander up a bit to say the least and when the guard asked where we were from DH said "US". The guy gave him a dirty look at which point DH said "Colorado". Finally he let us in, but made us throw out our apples. We were a family of four, with two little kids at the time 6 and 9 years old, and this was well before 9/11.
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Old 07-20-2017, 09:03 AM
 
6,520 posts, read 4,085,618 times
Reputation: 16818
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
We had the experience in bold crossing the border into Canada from Montana. The guy walked around our car several times, looking at the license plates, etc before he ever even talked with us. This got DH's dander up a bit to say the least and when the guard asked where we were from DH said "US". The guy gave him a dirty look at which point DH said "Colorado". Finally he let us in, but made us throw out our apples. We were a family of four, with two little kids at the time 6 and 9 years old, and this was well before 9/11.
We drove from Washington to the Vancouver airport to fly back to California. My sister's baggie of California-grown grapes made it through the Canada part of airport security just fine, but Homeland Security confiscated it. At least on that day, you could export US produce to Canada, but you couldn't then bring it back in to the US.
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