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Old 07-14-2017, 02:01 PM
 
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And do you think it affects how it is perceived?
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Old 07-14-2017, 02:21 PM
 
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I guess location, but certain parts of the area do have substantial to high black populations/percentages.
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Old 07-14-2017, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpstateBorn View Post
And do you think it affects how it is perceived?
Boston (and Greater Boston) isn't as black as the mentioned cities, but it's still pretty black. It just isn't as heavily African-American, which is what most mean by "black", like the above cities and most metros in the South/Midwest. In terms of raw numbers, it's still a top 25 metro, and blacker than many places in the country--especially the West.

What hurts Boston's perception, which is the real issue, is a) an ugly legacy of race relations among Northern cities (who pretty much were just as bad) that has given it a bad reputation a large AA population couldn't "counter" and b) newer darker skinned people and immigrants, like Dominicans and Cape Verdeans, who aren't counted as "black" and who haven't had the same impact on history/pop culture as AAs--yet. Location also plays a part, being so far removed from the South.

But overall, there are far worse places to be an AA or "black", and Boston's AA community has contributed to America at large.
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Old 07-14-2017, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Naples Island
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First of all, Boston is geographically farther from the South than New York, Philadelphia, Washington and Chicago, so therefore, it was a longer, more expensive journey for blacks when migrating northward during the Great Migration. Keep in mind that long-distance travel during this era was much different than it is presently.

Secondly, Boston has a colder climate than other large cities in the Northeast, which may have been another deterrent for blacks migrating northward from the generally mild South Atlantic states during the Great Migration. FYI, most blacks in New York and Philadelphia trace their origins to Virginia and the Carolinas.

Additionally, Boston and nearby Providence peaked from a standpoint of industrial output in the 19th century, before the Great Migration even began. By the early 20th century, manufacturing in New England was seriously declining and, by the mid-20th century, it had just about vanished. However, during much of the 20th century, manufacturing was still booming in the Great Lakes cities of Chicago, Cleveland and Detroit among others, so the likelihood of being more gainfully employed as an unskilled black laborer from a small Southern town was a lot higher in the Great Lakes region than New England for much of the Great Migration period (1910-1970).

Finally, the Boston metro has always maintained a very high percentage of ethnic whites, in particular Irish, Italian, Portuguese and French-Canadians. Not only were these immigrants unwelcoming of and even downright hostile towards African-Americans (sometimes pitted against each other by the Old Yankee elitists), they also directly competed with African-Americans for many of the same jobs in shipping and manufacturing, law enforcement and other industries. Additionally, these immigrants were heavily unionized, often along ethnic lines. Although there are many other cities in the in Northeast and Midwest with similar histories, Boston has always maintained the most pervasive/well-known reputation.

Last edited by Bert_from_back_East; 07-14-2017 at 03:01 PM..
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
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The city is a quarter black. It's not Atlanta by any means, but it still has a pretty large black population. It has more African-Americans than Irish-Americans (city proper at least) yet its labelled as an "Irish city."
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:24 PM
PDF
 
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Is there a reason it needs one?
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by PDF View Post
Is there a reason it needs one?
The thing is, it has always had one.
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Old 07-14-2017, 04:47 PM
 
Location: The Pacific Northwest
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1 in 4 Bostonians are black. That isn't significant to you?
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Old 07-14-2017, 05:55 PM
 
Location: New York NY
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Bostons rep in the last half century has been poor among blacks because of two horrid incidents: school desegregation (remember the terrible picture of a white guy stabbing a black man with an American flag?), and the awful Charles Stuart, who killed his pregnant wife, blamed it on a black man, and had Boston cops stopping black men at random, breaking into their homes, searching them without cause, basically creating a fascist state for black Bostonians--none of which would have happened if the Boston PD weren't so quick to believe that a black man was the culprit.

And in sports, the Red Sox was the LAST team in MLB to sign a black player, while Fenway fans were known for their nasty reactions to black players on visiting teams.

That is some awful history to overcome and IMO it still deters present-day African-Africans (though not necessarily black immigrants) from settling in Boston. Still there are some very famous black folk either from or strongly associated with Boston like Malcolm X, Dr. King, Bobby Brown, Donna Summer, and (way back in the day) Crispus Attucks.

You can't keep a good (black) man down!

Last edited by citylove101; 07-14-2017 at 06:11 PM..
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Old 07-14-2017, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bluefox View Post
1 in 4 Bostonians are black. That isn't significant to you?
Actually, Brockton and Randolph south of the city have even higher percentages. Randolph has 33,409 people and is 42.1% black(44.3% inc. in combo).

Brockton has 94,532 people and is 40.3% black(43.1% inc. in combo).

So, there are also other places in that metro with substantial to high percentages.
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