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Old 07-17-2017, 08:26 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,416 posts, read 11,917,166 times
Reputation: 10536

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Honestly, looking for a big affordable city which is classically urban isn't that difficult. Just move to Philly or Chicago and be very careful picking your neighborhood. Neither one is cheap (rents for a one bedroom are around $1,000 per month - a bit higher in Chicago, a bit lower in Philly) but in both cities there's plenty of neighborhoods which aren't trendy, yet aren't the ghetto where you can lead a full life on a slim budget.

What irks me are all the people who look for a city which is walkable, "progressive," affordable, and has mild winters. Anyone with half a brain should know such places do not exist in the U.S. If they did, all of those people looking for the exact same thing would have colonized them, and they wouldn't be affordable any longer.
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Old 07-17-2017, 10:10 AM
 
27 posts, read 17,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
Honestly, looking for a big affordable city which is classically urban isn't that difficult. Just move to Philly or Chicago and be very careful picking your neighborhood. Neither one is cheap (rents for a one bedroom are around $1,000 per month - a bit higher in Chicago, a bit lower in Philly) but in both cities there's plenty of neighborhoods which aren't trendy, yet aren't the ghetto where you can lead a full life on a slim budget.

What irks me are all the people who look for a city which is walkable, "progressive," affordable, and has mild winters. Anyone with half a brain should know such places do not exist in the U.S. If they did, all of those people looking for the exact same thing would have colonized them, and they wouldn't be affordable any longer.

Gotcha. So, in summary, every city has its good, bad, pricey, and cheap parts. I agree with you about people who look for cities that satisfy the criteria you listed; since I very well knew I was about to slip into that idealistic category before starting this thread, I had to self-consciously write the disclaimer that acknowledges that there is no "perfect" place.

However, I do prefer cold, harsh winters. They're the best.

As I like to say, "It's good where you aren't."
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Old 07-17-2017, 10:12 AM
 
2,289 posts, read 1,294,870 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

What irks me are all the people who look for a city which is walkable, "progressive," affordable, and has mild winters. Anyone with half a brain should know such places do not exist in the U.S. If they did, all of those people looking for the exact same thing would have colonized them, and they wouldn't be affordable any longer.
Yeah, we occasionally see threads like this, with people presenting a list of attractive qualities. Which brings their wish for a low Cost of Living in conflict with the Law of Supply and Demand.

Can't blame people for trying, though. It's understandable.

I live in Seattle, for which one can make a long list of attractive qualities. Those qualities are indeed attractive, and the local population-and congestion-is growing. And the Cost Of Living is not cheap.
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Old 07-17-2017, 10:13 AM
 
27 posts, read 17,613 times
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Originally Posted by motorman View Post
Although I was disappointed that Cincinnati got crossed off the list, it's your call and I hope you stick with Philadelphia. Reiterating things expressed in CityGuyForLife's #5 reply, not only is Philly one of the nation's most cultured and significant cities, it is also one of the most dynamic and connected. Only a handful of big U.S. cities rival it in amenities and only a few surpass it in urbanity. (Its downtown is amazing!)

As I expressed in another thread - I live in an absolutely beautiful mid sized city, but if I had the opportunity to start over again, without hesitation I would consider Philadelphia.
Hell yeah. A good friend of mine lives there, so I'll have to pay him a visit sometime. He has a goofy Philly accent--is that common over there? I sure as hell hope it is.

If you don't mind me asking, what city do you live in?
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Old 07-18-2017, 04:36 AM
 
Location: Cincinnati (Norwood)
3,507 posts, read 3,958,908 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vongol View Post
Hell yeah. A good friend of mine lives there, so I'll have to pay him a visit sometime. He has a goofy Philly accent--is that common over there? I sure as hell hope it is.

If you don't mind me asking, what city do you live in?
I'm glad to hear that you'll possibly be visiting Cincinnati, therefore there's no need for me to sell you on the city. However, because I do live here and know the city well, I'd encourage you to do at least three things while here: take a panoramic look at the city from the Carew Tower observatory; view the river and downtown from the balcony of the Immaculata Church in Mt. Adams; and spend time in OTR ("Over-the-Rhine"), along with a ride on the new streetcar before returning to (hopefully) Philadelphia.
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Old 08-02-2017, 10:18 AM
 
27 posts, read 17,613 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by motorman View Post
I'm glad to hear that you'll possibly be visiting Cincinnati, therefore there's no need for me to sell you on the city. However, because I do live here and know the city well, I'd encourage you to do at least three things while here: take a panoramic look at the city from the Carew Tower observatory; view the river and downtown from the balcony of the Immaculata Church in Mt. Adams; and spend time in OTR ("Over-the-Rhine"), along with a ride on the new streetcar before returning to (hopefully) Philadelphia.
Cincinnati has a certain flavor that draws me to it; it strikes me as a no-bull****, raw kind of city, a place that doesn't try to adopt some flashy style or concern itself with all the politics, vanity, and other affairs that lie beyond plowing through another day of honest work.
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Old 08-02-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Downtown Phoenix, AZ
18,927 posts, read 6,856,300 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vongol View Post
Oooh, OK. I'll just dump some names here, including cities that I have either visited or lived in and those that I know about through friends, family, and miscellaneous hearsay. I'll just list the names without elaboration to see if you get the general idea in descending order of "unfavorability."

These are all "mid-sized" cities that tend to have a lower-than-average median household income.

1. Jackson, MS
2. Memphis, TN
3. New Orleans, LA
4. Cincinnati, OH
5. Baltimore, MD
6. Sacramento, CA
7. Phoenix, AZ

Some "large" and prominent cities that I only know about and would never want to live in for various reasons include:

Los Angeles, CA; Houston, TX; and Miami, FL (it should already be obvious).
How is Phoenix mid sized, with a metro population of 4.5 million and teams in MLB,NHL,NBA,NFL?
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Old 08-02-2017, 02:45 PM
 
3,784 posts, read 3,001,076 times
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This list, while imperfect, could help give you some real, cold hard stats about what you're looking for.
Forbes List of the cities where your paycheck goes the furthest (COL/Salary (Likely Opportunity Also)) ratio.

1. Detroit
2. Memphis
3. Pittsburgh
4. Cleveland
5. Indianapolis
6. Saint Louis
7. Kansas City
8. Houston
9. Cincinnati
10. Atlanta
11. Dallas
12. Birmingham
13. Louisville
14. Oklahoma City
15. Columbus
16. Charlotte
17. Buffalo
18. San Antonio
19. Tampa
20. Chicago
21. Jacksonville
22. Raleigh
23. Minneapolis
24. Milwaukee
25. Hartford

You said you preferred cool and cloudy, and also, that you didn't like places that were sprawled out. So, I eliminated places that either had a decent portion of the year over 90* in temp/feel, and cities that had a population density of less than 5,000 psqm. for the main city. Here is the adjusted list:

-Detroit (slightly under 5,000, but I left it because it has great bones and character and amenities)
-Pittsburgh (highly attractive option. Great character, urbanity, topography etc.)
-Cleveland (I'm biased, but another option that would fit you well. Lakewood especially would make sense if you were concerned about being in a safe and affordable and dense area also. The city's density overall is almost 10,000 psqm., but areas surrounding it's downtown which is about to have big investment/development put into it are well over that even. 10 minutes on constantly running BRT to Downtown. Likewise, the area surrounding University Circle, Little Italy, Cedar Fairmount would be great as well for dense walkable neighborhoods, rapid access, and great culture. Lake Erie & CVNP too)
-Saint Louis (Left in despite being slightly below 5K also, great urban character, historic, quite hot in summer though)
-Cincinnati (Only about 4K psqm. but it's most urban parts are very urban and cultural. Very much worth a stop to see)
-Columbus (Not as urban or cultural as the others, but close enough qualities to your desires that it needs a mention)
-Buffalo (Smallest city listed so far, but not half bad. Great scenery nearby, and <2 hrs. to Toronto)
-Chicago (Biggest city, with most urban lifestyle, most culture, most diverse work opportunities of any mentioned so far. As you mentioned though, not cheap, especially when wanting to live in the city, but not in a sketch area)
-Minneapolis (Another good option, though from what I understand, almost as expensive if not as much as Chicago)
-Milwaukee (A much smaller, but still very nice Chicago, in a way. Close to Chicago for visiting, too)
-Hartford (Not as many amenities as these others, but, perhaps a more optimal location, if wanting to visit NYC or Boston)

This list would seem to be a good starting point for you. Philadelphia didn't make it on the Forbes list either, but I can see why you're considering it also with it's good opportunity, relative affordability, and dynamic presence and amenities. It would be high on my list as well.
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Old 09-08-2017, 12:53 PM
 
1,019 posts, read 1,111,906 times
Reputation: 679
https://realestate.usnews.com/real-e...-2017?slide=26

according to US NEWS Demoines Iowa is it , number most affordable city
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