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Old 07-20-2017, 07:49 PM
 
Location: SC
8,793 posts, read 5,666,073 times
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Of course it is island, so many people may describe it as being "like" Hawaii.

But, if you had to describe Puerto Rico, but only by using other states and cities as a model, how would you describe it...

For example:

I was once told that Toronto ON is very much like Philadelphia:
  • Large Central Downtown
  • Neighborhoods of Row Homes
  • Trollies
  • Very racially distinct neighborhoods.
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Old 07-20-2017, 08:25 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,778,608 times
Reputation: 8804
Old Town San Juan looks like the French Quarter but I'd imagine the culture is far more inline with Miami. Although I can't imagine that PR looks or feels like any other state.

New York will probably come up soon.
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Old 07-20-2017, 10:42 PM
 
Location: BMORE!
7,748 posts, read 6,154,664 times
Reputation: 3601
The Bronx with palm trees?
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Old 07-21-2017, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
40 posts, read 40,042 times
Reputation: 54
I've been to both Puerto Rico and numerous other states, and truthfully, the island feels much more like its Latin American neighbors than anywhere in the US.

Obviously the biggest difference is simply that Puerto Ricans by and large speak Spanish rather than English as their primary language, but other differences exist as well.

The culture is much more reflective of the Caribbean than the US, and this comes out easily when you get away from the tourist hotels and spots. It's a bit hard to put into words, but you feel a different atmosphere for sure. The way families and neighbors interact on the street seems much more public than how most people in the US socialize, and it exudes a certain sense of togetherness, even with a language barrier.

Yes, Hawaii has similarities on a visual level. It has palm trees, it has the sun, it has beaches, etc. However, Hawaii at the end of the day still feels like you're in the US, because, well, you are, and the people reflect that. That's not to say Hawaiians are not unique in anyway, but the way I perceived them wasn't all that foreign.

If we're going to step back from culture and people and just look at appearances, I'd still say there's some differences.

Most of the architecture in housing reflects that of other Latin American places, with the brightly painted colors, bars and gates for security, and in general being a large divergence from most of what you see in the States.

It's also worth mentioning that because the economy in Puerto Rico is much less prosperous than the US, most people's quality of life is considerably lower than the average in the States. This fosters not only differences in things like crime, but the culture in Puerto Rico feels considerably blue-collar, but with a twist that differentiates it from the American style of it.

As for the mention of NYC being a candidate, I'd say there are almost no comparisons to be made. They feel like two completely different places.

Ultimately, the only way you'll find something like Puerto Rico in the continental US is to go to Puerto Rican neighborhoods in cities with large amounts of immigrants from the island.
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Old 07-21-2017, 12:38 AM
 
10 posts, read 9,667 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SmoothOperator545 View Post
I've been to both Puerto Rico and numerous other states, and truthfully, the island feels much more like its Latin American neighbors than anywhere in the US.

Obviously the biggest difference is simply that Puerto Ricans by and large speak Spanish rather than English as their primary language, but other differences exist as well.

The culture is much more reflective of the Caribbean than the US, and this comes out easily when you get away from the tourist hotels and spots. It's a bit hard to put into words, but you feel a different atmosphere for sure. The way families and neighbors interact on the street seems much more public than how most people in the US socialize, and it exudes a certain sense of togetherness, even with a language barrier.

Yes, Hawaii has similarities on a visual level. It has palm trees, it has the sun, it has beaches, etc. However, Hawaii at the end of the day still feels like you're in the US, because, well, you are, and the people reflect that. That's not to say Hawaiians are not unique in anyway, but the way I perceived them wasn't all that foreign.

If we're going to step back from culture and people and just look at appearances, I'd still say there's some differences.

Most of the architecture in housing reflects that of other Latin American places, with the brightly painted colors, bars and gates for security, and in general being a large divergence from most of what you see in the States.

It's also worth mentioning that because the economy in Puerto Rico is much less prosperous than the US, most people's quality of life is considerably lower than the average in the States. This fosters not only differences in things like crime, but the culture in Puerto Rico feels considerably blue-collar, but with a twist that differentiates it from the American style of it.

As for the mention of NYC being a candidate, I'd say there are almost no comparisons to be made. They feel like two completely different places.

Ultimately, the only way you'll find something like Puerto Rico in the continental US is to go to Puerto Rican neighborhoods in cities with large amounts of immigrants from the island.
Exactly, there is not a single possible comparison between PR and any state from mainland US. Practically I can't add nothing more as you pointed it perfectly.

Maybe for the tropical entourage you can think of Miami or Hawaii, but when you see the buildings you clearly notice that you're closer to the Dominican Republic than to elsewhere in the US.
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Old 07-21-2017, 07:43 AM
 
7,719 posts, read 4,578,077 times
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San Juan is like the poor man's Miami. Old San Juan may LOOK like New Orleans but shares very little of the feel. I haven't experienced all of PR, but outside of San Juan, nothing reminded me of the US, and I say this as a man who grew up around Puerto Ricans.
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Old 07-21-2017, 12:13 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,393,954 times
Reputation: 7710
A mix of Hawaii and Miami, I guess. And not really Florida, just Miami. Orlando may have a high Puerto Rican population but I wouldn't confuse anywhere in Orlando for Puerto Rico. Miami, though..
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