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Old 07-24-2017, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
44,850 posts, read 36,203,761 times
Reputation: 63514

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pnwguy2 View Post
You are not alone. I feel the same way. There are certain sounds that help us realize that life is going on as normal. Train whistles (or I guess horn is the better term today). How about the sound of rain, the sound of thunder, and to a lessor degree, airplanes and even police sirens. (Though, admittedly the last two examples are less pleasant).

I'm with you on the sound of rain or a storm. Hope to hear some of that today!
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Old 07-24-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,587 posts, read 17,582,380 times
Reputation: 27677
There are no passenger trains running within probably a hundred miles of here, minimum.

There are lots of trains hauling coal out of the area to other destinations.
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Old 07-24-2017, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Wonderland
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We have an Amtrak station about 20 miles north of us - 19 total in Texas. But the trains that come through my town are carrying goods, not people.
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Old 07-24-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: crafton pa
979 posts, read 357,029 times
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OP,


I would suspect that there are few decently-sized cities without any rail service at all. Passenger service is a shell of what it once was, and many cities no longer have intercity passenger rail. Freight service by rail, though, is as strong as it ever was. That's especially true with the intermodal service that occurs on most freight railroads. In this type of service, rather than shipping goods long distance via tractor trailer, goods are shipped from their origin via tractor trailer to an intermodal freight yard. There are now specially designed freight cars that allow a trailer to be detached directly from the truck and placed into a freight car without unloading the contents. The long-distance portion of the trip is then by rail, with the trailer unloaded at a destination intermodal terminal and transported to the end user via a local truck.


Because of this method of shipping, there may be fewer smaller towns and cities with freight rail service, especially if these towns are located relatively close to an intermodal yard. However, major destinations likely have, and will have for the forseeable future, freight rail service.
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Old 07-24-2017, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
12,351 posts, read 7,513,144 times
Reputation: 15950
Total rail mileage in the United States peaked in 1915, a time when almost everything moving between cities without a seaport or navigable river had to move by rail. The coming of the self-propelled vehicle and the all-weather highway upset that monopoly, and fairly quickly. That set off a long period of decline that left about 1/3 of the nation's rail mileage in the bankruptcy courts by 1980. At that point. economic necessity took over and almost everyone, including the rail unions, cooperated n reforms that returned most of the industry to stable, but unspectacular profitability (along the lines of electric utilities0, and kept most of it in the private sector.

The present-day rail industry is geared almost exclusively to the handling of shipments in large quantities -- be it containers moving between a smaller number of large population centers, or bulky, low-value raw materials. In the process. total mileage has fallen from over 200,000 to about 140,000. Small rural communities can be served by trucking as an adjunct to the "core" system which, in North America, amounts to seven major players, plus regional and short-line systems which operate under less-stringent, and less-expensive work rules.

"The mills of the gods grind slowly, but exceedingly fine." (apocryphal)

No industry is more closely-intertwined with politics than the railroads, so change comes about very slowly, but in the end -- efficiency rules. The system will continue to evolve.

It's also worth noting that only four national groups -- the United States, Canada, China, and the heirs to the former Soviet Union -- rely heavily upon rail freight service. Most of Europe has access to navigable water, and the emerging nations of the Third World had very little mileage in place before the development of trucking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slowlane3 View Post
My town ended passenger service around 1950, but a couple of trains a day still pass thru just to haul coal to the electric power plant nearby, at the line's end. I like the charm of hearing the train whistle. A restaurant by the tracks is named "Casey Jones." A few miles up the highway is a very popular rail-trail, opened recently on the bed of a long-shuttered rail line that used to carry supplies to a defense factory.
Agreed1 My "retirement/vacation" second home is a rented room over a small hotel and restaurant which adjoins the Norfolk Southern's principal line into the New York Metro. There are about thirty freights a day, no passenger service, and the station across the square has been converted into an upscale coffee shop. It's a constant reminder that the only certainty in life is change.

http://www.themarketcafe.net/

Last edited by 2nd trick op; 07-24-2017 at 12:23 PM..
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Old 07-24-2017, 02:20 PM
 
Location: Floribama
15,027 posts, read 31,400,710 times
Reputation: 13835
There's a railroad 200' from my front door, my whole town was built around the railroad. It was originally put down when the settlers were cutting the Longleaf pines forests for timber, they used trains to haul the logs to the sawmills. As the towns were built around the sawmills, then they started using them for passenger service as well.

These days CSX owns the tracks, and theyre pretty much just used for freight only. Local leaders have been trying to re-establish Amtrack service between New Orleans and Orlando, but it seems there's always some obstacle in the way. The problem seems to be that CSX doesn't want to be delayed by late running Amtrack trains.
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Old 07-25-2017, 12:50 AM
 
Location: Atlanta
5,297 posts, read 3,513,713 times
Reputation: 4466
Quote:
Originally Posted by southernnaturelover View Post
There's a railroad 200' from my front door, my whole town was built around the railroad. It was originally put down when the settlers were cutting the Longleaf pines forests for timber, they used trains to haul the logs to the sawmills. As the towns were built around the sawmills, then they started using them for passenger service as well.

These days CSX owns the tracks, and theyre pretty much just used for freight only. Local leaders have been trying to re-establish Amtrack service between New Orleans and Orlando, but it seems there's always some obstacle in the way. The problem seems to be that CSX doesn't want to be delayed by late running Amtrack trains.
CSX is one of the hardest railroads to deal with when it comes to any type of passenger rail on their tracks or right of way. They basically forced Florida to buy them out in Metro Orlando when Sunrail commuter trains were launched.

I really hope the line near you works out with reintroduced Amtrak service. Tallahassee is pushing for it big time, and the new plans are for daily trains.
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Old 07-28-2017, 04:03 PM
 
Location: Sale Creek, TN
3,973 posts, read 3,636,772 times
Reputation: 4257
The main crossing, is the start/end of the side track. I happen to live on the wrong side of the tracks, let me be running late, guess what happens? Yet, I wouldn't trade it for the world. Rural area, btw.
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Old 07-28-2017, 11:12 PM
 
Location: Katy-zuela
4,852 posts, read 8,996,558 times
Reputation: 2364
One railroad was removed to build the Westpark Tollway. The other one was removed to expand the Katy Freeway. Managed lanes inside the city limits made the freeway wide enough to necessitate the removal of the railroad tracks.

Good luck adding commuter rail to my west Houston suburb!
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Old 07-29-2017, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Somewhere flat in Mississippi
9,533 posts, read 9,417,427 times
Reputation: 6701
Quote:
Originally Posted by KerrTown View Post
One railroad was removed to build the Westpark Tollway. The other one was removed to expand the Katy Freeway. Managed lanes inside the city limits made the freeway wide enough to necessitate the removal of the railroad tracks.

Good luck adding commuter rail to my west Houston suburb!
The first could have made a shortcut for the Sunset Route. The second was redundant after the Union Pacific bought the Katy Railroad in the 1980s. The railroad begins again at Katy and goes west.
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