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Old 07-23-2017, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Atlanta metro (Cobb County)
1,583 posts, read 760,115 times
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Many of the northern suburbs of Atlanta are relatively similar to the Ballantyne area of south Charlotte. Higher concentrations of Indians are found in the north and northeast suburbs, particularly Johns Creek and Duluth, but there is a lot of cultural diversity all around the area. The school systems in this suburban area are excellent and there is certainly plenty of demand for medical professionals.

Georgia and North Carolina have a lot in common, the major difference being that NC's metropolitan population is more spread out between a few different areas, and GA's is more concentrated in very sprawling greater Atlanta. Compared to Texas, both states are a little more moderate politically (but still right of center), and in my opinion more visually scenic with a milder climate.
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:15 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,337 posts, read 7,012,405 times
Reputation: 3511
Quote:
Originally Posted by md1429 View Post
I really appreciate you giving detailed info about JAX. Any thoughts on Tampa, St. Pete's, Wellington, Jupiter, Orlando etc? We are 100% going to leave NYC. Day 1 we had decided that we are only here in NYC for my training and that it is not a permanent place we would call home.

We do not mind a moderate Indian community. But we want one where we can teach our children about our culture. I am not looking for a community where every angle I turn I see Indians. Might as well I move back home then ! I am looking for a cosmopolitan city. But as Texas Ag 93, mentioned we will have to keep the saturation point in mind and consider our trade offs between being a "big fish in a small pond or small fish in a big pond".
If youre looking for "cosmopolitan" then I don't think Jax is there yet. Tampa, St Pete and Orlando have probably enough of a cosmopolitan vibe imo to receive that label, although it's not pervasive or profound. I don't know much at all about the Wellington and Jupiter submarkets.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:48 PM
 
54 posts, read 43,276 times
Reputation: 118
Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
would give some serious pause to states like Texas and Florida who seem especially prone to politicizing the health insurance coverage in terms of drastic cutbacks in funding and lack of options in the state marketplace for affordable insurance coverage, especially since both states are near the bottom in terms of average household income. California is a good option though obviously quite expensive outside of possibly the Sacramento area or less populated areas inland.
I'd be wary of mindless babble like this, OP.

This person thinks that the income number is all there is to a local economy, which shows he or she has no idea what they are talking about.

Purchasing power is what you should actually look at when considering state economies. The cost of living in Texas and Florida is much lower than California, which means a lower salary in Texas might actually go farther in Texas or FL than CA.

Here's some data, which puts California among the very bottom of american states in terms of purchasing power:

https://www.advisorperspectives.com/...-states-and-dc
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Old 07-27-2017, 11:01 PM
Status: "Warrior fan no matter the roster" (set 6 days ago)
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,223 posts, read 10,464,475 times
Reputation: 11246
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlizzardsAndSuch View Post
I'd be wary of mindless babble like this, OP.

This person thinks that the income number is all there is to a local economy, which shows he or she has no idea what they are talking about.

Purchasing power is what you should actually look at when considering state economies. The cost of living in Texas and Florida is much lower than California, which means a lower salary in Texas might actually go farther in Texas or FL than CA.

Here's some data, which puts California among the very bottom of american states in terms of purchasing power:

https://www.advisorperspectives.com/...-states-and-dc
It's important when considering reimbursement of services as a physician, though. States which are not actively seeking to keep as many of their citizens insured, through Medicaid or private insurance, would not be as attractive, regardless of "purchasing power".
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Old 07-28-2017, 05:36 AM
 
Location: Texas
3,969 posts, read 3,308,929 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Natural510 View Post
It's important when considering reimbursement of services as a physician, though. States which are not actively seeking to keep as many of their citizens insured, through Medicaid or private insurance, would not be as attractive, regardless of "purchasing power".
I agree that reimbursement potential should be considered by the OP, however, based on personal experience, I also concur with previous statements that reimbursement/payor mix is not a big problem for physicians who practice in most urban and suburban settings in these states. For example, the suburban areas that have been mentioned in Texas are all higher income areas with very high percentages of insured patients. My husband is in practice in suburban Houston and sees almost no Medicaid or no pay patients, conversely, his practice in generally progressive Denver had a huge Medicaid/Medicare/no pay population, which was a major contributing factor in our decision to leave.

Insurability and accessibility issues tend to be fairly limited to inner city and rural markets, which, no doubt, is a big problem in and of itself, but I don't think OP should reject states like TX and FL out of hand, because he can easily find very good markets within each of these states and as stan4 pointed out, his patients will primarily be Medicare regardless of where he practices.

Last edited by Texas Ag 93; 07-28-2017 at 05:51 AM..
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Old 07-30-2017, 06:34 AM
 
21,255 posts, read 30,528,126 times
Reputation: 19742
Quote:
Originally Posted by BlizzardsAndSuch View Post
I'd be wary of mindless babble like this, OP.

This person thinks that the income number is all there is to a local economy, which shows he or she has no idea what they are talking about.

Purchasing power is what you should actually look at when considering state economies. The cost of living in Texas and Florida is much lower than California, which means a lower salary in Texas might actually go farther in Texas or FL than CA.

Here's some data, which puts California among the very bottom of american states in terms of purchasing power:

https://www.advisorperspectives.com/...-states-and-dc
Mindless babble? You're the one comparing local economic data to state data. Seriously, how is that even comparable? Thankfully I'm sure the OP is sharp enough to figure that out and can assess logically.
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Old 09-04-2017, 11:02 AM
 
26 posts, read 15,980 times
Reputation: 15
Thank you, everyone, for your responses. So I have managed to narrow down my choices after interviewing at a few places to 2 offers.

As weird as it may sound, one is in North Houston, TX & the other is in Greensboro, NC. So now that I have to compare the offers what should I keep in mind? I do not want to rule out Houston just bec of Hurricane Harvey. A lot of people around here in NY tell me to rethink my Houston offer bec of Harvey. Someone I spoke with, told me that they would pick NC over TX bec NC is a growing state. They also told me things which I already know like - it has 4 seasons, easy access to the mountains, beaches etc. I am aware of this, but 4 seasons and beach access are not the deciding factors. As long as there are no harsh winters and snow storms, we are fine. We can handle mild winter/slight snow or hot and humid climate. Hence our reason to pick TX & NC.

Everyone keeps saying that NC is a growing state. But what do they mean by that? How do I compare it with TX? I know that NC nickles and dimes you in the form of taxes for everything. They even have vehicle tax (Annual property tax on your car). But at the same time TX has high property tax and NO state income tax. So is that a wash when comparing the 2 states tax wise?

How are the schools/education in both the above locations?

I know that Houston would check off on a lot of things on our list, but we do not want to pick Houston just bec it is a happening place in comparison to Greensboro.

Last edited by md1429; 09-04-2017 at 11:19 AM.. Reason: Typo
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Old 09-04-2017, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Miami-Jax
6,337 posts, read 7,012,405 times
Reputation: 3511
Houston is a heckuva lot more cosmopolitan than Greensboro. And TX is a growing state...not sure how that can possibly be ignored when discussing NC. I believe by most metrics and timelines it is growing much faster than NC.

Good luck!
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Old 09-04-2017, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Texas
3,969 posts, read 3,308,929 times
Reputation: 6823
Quote:
Originally Posted by md1429 View Post
Thank you, everyone, for your responses. So I have managed to narrow down my choices after interviewing at a few places to 2 offers.
If I were you, I would base your decision on the strength of the offers themselves and how you expect they will position you best out of the gate for your career, because the reality is, you very possibly won't be at your first practice more than about 3-5 years. Which offer is the best in terms of compensation/income potential, reasonable productivity measures, buy in and investment potential (if private practice), reputation of the group etc. Sometimes, you may not know the answers to these questions, and have to make an educated guess. Just do the best that you can.

I would not eliminate Houston solely because of Harvey. No matter what you hear, this storm will absolutely not beat this city. It is too big, with too strong and diverse an economy, and filled with too many strong people for failure to happen. That said, this past 10 days have been really, really hard on us. I did not have any flooding damage, nor did anyone in my family, or any close friends for that matter....but lots of people did. The damage touched everyone- poor neighborhoods, wealthy neighborhoods, North, East, West. No way to predict or prepare for the massive flooding that happened. It was a freak storm.

But, if I had no family or connection to Houston, yes, I might give pause to moving here right now. I would possibly wait and see what things will be in 12 months. You don't have the luxury of time, so you might have to take a chance. You might also consider that many people will hold off on healthcare choices for the near term as they get their lives back in order. This may not affect you as a Cardiologist based on the nature of the specialty and payor mix, but it's definitely something we will be considering, since my husband does primarily elective surgery. We're going to be keeping a close eye on his practice over the next 12 months. If we ever thought we would need to relocate, we'd do it.
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