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View Poll Results: Are river cities "landlocked?"
Of course, what kind of question is this? Who cares about a river? 27 46.55%
No, their location on the water is as significant as any other ocean, lake, etc. 8 13.79%
It's complicated, somewhere between coastal and landlocked 23 39.66%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-23-2017, 07:05 AM
 
Location: The City
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Philly was founded where it is because it was the first place the settlers could safely dock coming up the DE Bay. Philly basically sits where the river ends (a few miles south) and the bay begins. The salt water line can reach Philadelphia proper at times.


it is also a shorter maritime route from the ocean than Baltimore as the DE Bay is smaller than the Chesapeake.


different from inland river cities Philly has a true ocean faring port, more similar to a Houston in location or proximity to the ocean then any inland river cities like a Cinci etc.


The port complex of the Philly area is actually one of the largest in the country. It actually is considered the largest fresh water sea port in the world as technically the true salt line lies a few miles south


Philly also has many burbs very close to the ocean and a huge connection to the south jersey beaches which most would consider Philadelphia area beaches
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQConvict View Post
A landlocked state in the United States is any state whose territorial boundaries do not touch an ocean, gulf, or bay.

A state is called singly landlocked if one must travel through only one other U.S. state or Canadian province to reach an ocean, gulf, or bay.

A state is called doubly landlocked if one must travel through two U.S. states, or one U.S. state and one Canadian province to reach an ocean, gulf, or bay.

A state is called triply landlocked if one must travel through three U.S. states, or two U.S. states and one Canadian province to reach an ocean, gulf, or bay.


Source: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/List...ed_U.S._states

Landlocked states in red:
I guess the definition of "landlocked" can be different, as I sure don't feel landlocked when I'm on the Wisconsin eastern border....which is all water. Michigan is surrounded by water, yet (by definition) landlocked. Not buying it.

Please try to convince me that Wisconsin is "landlocked".

https://www.google.com/search?q=wisc...w=1920&bih=974
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Old 07-23-2017, 07:32 AM
 
Location: Chicago
5,877 posts, read 6,535,124 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by PerseusVeil View Post
The Mississippi is terribly important to St. Louis, but St. Louis doesn't interact with its riverfront in the same way that a city like Chicago interacts with its riverfront or its lakefront. The Mississippi being an active river in regards to trade, its harsh currents, and general polluted nature make it an undesirable river for pleasure boating in metro St. Louis. St. Louisans generally prefer to take these activities to other rivers in the metro. St. Louis also doesn't have personal use harbors on the Mississippi River in the same way that Chicago has harbors on Lake Michigan and the Chicago River. Additionally, St. Louis lacks the riverwalks that Chicago has on the Chicago River. This probably boils down to the sheer amount of the Mississippi riverfront that's still dominated by industry and barges, and the fact that the Mississippi floods frequently. Due to this, St. Louis doesn't give off nearly the same vibe as Chicago when it comes to waterfronts. For example, in terms of desirable neighborhoods. St. Louis seems to almost entirely disregard its waterfront in favor of a neighborhood like the Central West End that borders the eastern half of Forest Park. In Chicago, some of the most desirable neighborhoods in the city border Lake Michigan.
You raise valid points about the way StL interacts with its riverfront and the reasons it does so, but doesn't Memphis, a bit downstream and arguably with many of the same conditions, do a better job of interacting with the river?

I realize the Mississippi is different in different locations and certainly Minneapolis benefits from being on the stretch of river it is, but aren't there still places on the midsection of the river that do a better job than StL?
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:34 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Yes. If you're not on a coast you're landlocked, imo. Especially if you're in a landlocked state. Nashville, Columbia, Memphis, St Louis, Salt Lake, DC, Phily, etc, they're landlocked.

I would not count Detroit, Chicago, Cleveland, Milwaukee, Erie, etc. The Great Lakes are so big they have tides, beaches, and even effect the weather, and they're the size of states themselves.
Lol what a inaccurate post. Philly is a sea port (container sea port at that) located at sea level on the brackish Delaware river which is a tidal estuary (with real ocean tides) that flows directly in the open ocean. Philly is far from landlocked. It is an coastal river city.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit...ontainer_ports
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cate...Atlantic_coast

If anything, great Lake cities like Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee are all landlocked compared to Philly. They are all hundreds of feet above sea level and lack the features (container ports, ocean tides etc) of an coastal river city like Philly.
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Old 07-23-2017, 08:38 AM
 
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Originally Posted by nephi215 View Post
Lol what a inaccurate post. Philly is a sea port (container sea port at that) located at sea level on the brackish Delaware river which is a tidal estuary (with real ocean tides) that flows directly in the open ocean. Philly is far from landlocked. It is an coastal river city.


https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit...ontainer_ports
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cate...Atlantic_coast

If anything, great Lake cities like Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit and Milwaukee are all landlocked compared to Philly. They are all hundreds of feet above sea level and lack the features (container ports, ocean tides etc) of an coastal river city like Philly.
Really, I would never feel that way in Milwaukee or Chicago..you can't see across to the other side. Water is water, and Lake Michigan looks like an ocean when you're in those two cities.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:11 AM
 
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The definition of landlocked is no direct access to the ocean or a sea. So cities on rivers and lakes don't count and they are still technically landlocked. The Great Lakes are still lakes and not seas, so even though they are quite large, a city on the Great Lakes is still technically landlocked by the definition of the word. It doesn't matter what ones feelings are, it's the definition of the word.

The only arguable thing I could see is fresh water bays of the ocean, which are not considered seas, but I don't know of any in the US. Maybe New Orleans, I'm not sure.
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Old 07-23-2017, 09:58 AM
 
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I say it depends on whether or not the river has access to the ocean.
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Old 07-23-2017, 10:00 AM
 
2,795 posts, read 1,636,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
The definition of landlocked is no direct access to the ocean or a sea. So cities on rivers and lakes don't count and they are still technically landlocked. The Great Lakes are still lakes and not seas, so even though they are quite large, a city on the Great Lakes is still technically landlocked by the definition of the word. It doesn't matter what ones feelings are, it's the definition of the word.

The only arguable thing I could see is fresh water bays of the ocean, which are not considered seas, but I don't know of any in the US. Maybe New Orleans, I'm not sure.
Baltimore 100% fits that criteria.
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Old 07-23-2017, 10:16 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Turnerbro View Post
Baltimore 100% fits that criteria.
Oakland, San Jose, and I think Providence, Seattle.
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Old 07-23-2017, 11:02 AM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,018,456 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattks View Post
The definition of landlocked is no direct access to the ocean or a sea. So cities on rivers and lakes don't count and they are still technically landlocked. The Great Lakes are still lakes and not seas, so even though they are quite large, a city on the Great Lakes is still technically landlocked by the definition of the word. It doesn't matter what ones feelings are, it's the definition of the word.

The only arguable thing I could see is fresh water bays of the ocean, which are not considered seas, but I don't know of any in the US. Maybe New Orleans, I'm not sure.
But, really, I don't believe the OP didn't count the Great Lakes. There are definitions of "seas" that fit the Great Lakes....a rose is a rose, and a huge body of water as an entire state border, doesn't make that state landlocked...not by any means.
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