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View Poll Results: Are river cities "landlocked?"
Of course, what kind of question is this? Who cares about a river? 27 46.55%
No, their location on the water is as significant as any other ocean, lake, etc. 8 13.79%
It's complicated, somewhere between coastal and landlocked 23 39.66%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 07-24-2017, 05:54 AM
 
Location: Atlanta, GA
296 posts, read 537,986 times
Reputation: 343

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IF you don't have an Ocean shore in your state, it is landlocked.
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Old 07-24-2017, 07:19 AM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
Reputation: 2662
The OP inquired about cities, not states. Please tell me how Atlanta is not landlocked.....(where's the water?)

https://www.google.com/search?q=atla...w=1920&bih=974


and, cities like Milwaukee and Chicago are...

https://www.google.com/search?q=chic...w=1920&bih=974

https://www.google.com/search?q=milw...w=1920&bih=974
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Old 07-24-2017, 07:31 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,529,334 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
The OP inquired about cities, not states. Please tell me how Atlanta is not landlocked.....(where's the water?)

https://www.google.com/search?q=atla...w=1920&bih=974


and, cities like Milwaukee and Chicago are...

https://www.google.com/search?q=chic...w=1920&bih=974

https://www.google.com/search?q=milw...w=1920&bih=974
How many continents can you access without traveling through another state or country? If that answer is 7 you're coastal if that answer is 1 you're landlocked.
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Old 07-24-2017, 07:40 AM
 
2,013 posts, read 1,011,832 times
Reputation: 2662
Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
How many continents can you access without traveling through another state or country? If that answer is 7 you're coastal if that answer is 1 you're landlocked.
We are taking it to the extreme. Read the OPs first post, again....it's not that difficult.
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Old 07-24-2017, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Mars City
5,091 posts, read 2,136,536 times
Reputation: 7505
Are we confusing two very different things? The thread talks about "river cities", and others are talking about "ocean states". The graphic of the states that border the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf of Mexico is nice to show the "ocean states", but thread seems to be about "river cities".
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Old 07-24-2017, 11:52 AM
 
9,383 posts, read 9,529,334 times
Reputation: 5786
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
We are taking it to the extreme. Read the OPs first post, again....it's not that difficult.
It is quite simple, the Erie Canal was built because Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit etc would be landlocked without it, they needed Canada (not a good option in 1805) to get their goods to market in Europe. The Fact that the Great Lakes are not the ocean directly lead to Buffalo being a city at all. It is an important distinction whether you like it or not.
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Old 07-24-2017, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Point Loma, San Diego, CA
1,306 posts, read 1,102,589 times
Reputation: 1103
Quote:
Originally Posted by Parhe View Post
Of course they are landlocked. Is every state not landlocked because they each have a river leading to the ocean? Even DFW is on the Trinity River. Unless I am missing something, being coastal or landlocked isn't a comment on lifestyle or amenities.
Ever heard the phrase "flyover country?" I'd like to believe this too, but lets face it, if the title of this thread was "is Chicago landlocked", I suspect it would get heated real fast. I agree that its not a comment on either of those things too, that's me though.
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Old 07-24-2017, 12:47 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by CityGuyForLife View Post
I personally think it's situational, depending on how integrated the water is to the culture of the city, as well as the specific point of access to the ocean and distance from it. There are cities that are on the mouth of rivers or bays/estuaries that lead directly to the ocean, and I wouldn't consider them "landlocked" (because they're not), even though they're not truly "coastal" (beach culture, in addition to ports). "Maritime" I think would be the best descriptor.


As examples, I'm thinking specifically of Wilmington, DE and Baltimore in this region, which are not "coastal" cities in the truest sense, but have strong maritime histories, influence and "feel". Philadelphia I consider also as "maritime" (less so, imo, then either Baltimore or Wilmington, though noticeable), but definitely not "coastal". Washington DC I feel is the real outlier in the region, as it never gives off a maritime feel to me, despite being on the Potamac and Anacostia rivers.

Isn't Baltimore on Chesapeake Bay?
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Old 07-24-2017, 01:13 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,053 posts, read 3,377,056 times
Reputation: 7690
Quote:
Originally Posted by Losfrisco View Post
I'm not talking about tourism/cruise ships.


Mayor Garcia statement in response to Florida Governor Rick Scott

My dad works for a cargo company in the port of Miami handling heavy volumes of freight... It ain't just tourism. Miami is the port of entry for cargo coming from Central and South America as well as the Caribbean. It has heavily industrial ports. If you take the causeway from downtown Miami to Miami Beach and you look to the south, you'll see all the cranes. I assure you they're not for hauling suitcases.
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Old 07-24-2017, 02:10 PM
 
Location: Baltimore, MD
3,511 posts, read 2,968,854 times
Reputation: 2737
Quote:
Originally Posted by BadgerFilms View Post
Isn't Baltimore on Chesapeake Bay?
Yes and no. Technically, it's on the Patapsco River, which flows directly into Chesapeake Bay. Baltimore's Inner Harbor is where the Patapsco gets big. The only major difference between Baltimore and Philadelphia/Wilmington is the distance at which the major river "meets" the major bay--Baltimore's is significantly shorter than Philadelphia's, and about 12 miles or so shorter than Wilmington's. Though all three are on major estuaries, despite where the river meets, so you could argue that it's all semantics. Annapolis is where the Severn River empties right there into the Chesapeake, so if any important city in the region is "right on" its bay, it's that one (well that and Norfolk/VA Beach/Hampton). It's semantics I guess, since both bays are so huge, along with their watersheds.
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