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View Poll Results: Are river cities "landlocked?"
Of course, what kind of question is this? Who cares about a river? 27 46.55%
No, their location on the water is as significant as any other ocean, lake, etc. 8 13.79%
It's complicated, somewhere between coastal and landlocked 23 39.66%
Voters: 58. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 07-27-2017, 10:06 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I think of cities along the shores of the Great Lakes as technically landlocked but not functionally.
Buffalo NY literally wouldn't exist if the Great Lakes were not functionally landlocked. Buffalo owes its existence to transferring cargo from Lake Ships to Barges that then were sent down the Erie Canal then down the Hudson River.
The Great lakes do not have unfettered access to the Ocean, thus are landlocked, if they were not landlocked they wouldn't be lakes.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:18 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Buffalo NY literally wouldn't exist if the Great Lakes were not functionally landlocked. Buffalo owes its existence to transferring cargo from Lake Ships to Barges that then were sent down the Erie Canal then down the Hudson River.
The Great lakes do not have unfettered access to the Ocean, thus are landlocked, if they were not landlocked they wouldn't be lakes.
I guess most here, are very much in favor of not deviating from the definition of landlocked. If one can gain access to the ocean, with access to rivers that meander through states, you're not landlocked. BUT, if you have this...

https://pixabay.com/en/lake-shore-la...chigan-476870/

as your entire eastern border, you're landlocked. I'll take landlocked.
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Old 07-27-2017, 10:22 AM
 
29,874 posts, read 27,333,728 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by btownboss4 View Post
Buffalo NY literally wouldn't exist if the Great Lakes were not functionally landlocked. Buffalo owes its existence to transferring cargo from Lake Ships to Barges that then were sent down the Erie Canal then down the Hudson River.
The Great lakes do not have unfettered access to the Ocean, thus are landlocked, if they were not landlocked they wouldn't be lakes.
I should have been clear in that I meant "functionally landlocked" more in a recreational sense.
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Old 07-28-2017, 08:58 AM
 
11,171 posts, read 22,363,867 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
I should have been clear in that I meant "functionally landlocked" more in a recreational sense.
The port in Chicago isn't used as much, but it used to be a lot more in the 20th century. Now with intermodal and the strong connections across the country most ships drop at the coast, then use the highways and railroads to get their goods across the country.

Back in the 1960's Chicago used to get around 600 international freighter ships per year.

Still today around 175,000,000 tons of cargo moves throughout the lakes each year compared to around 300,000,000 tons as recently as the 1970's.
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Old 07-28-2017, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Nescopeck, Penna. (birthplace)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Back in the 1960's Chicago used to get around 600 international freighter ships per year.

Still today around 175,000,000 tons of cargo moves throughout the lakes each year compared to around 300,000,000 tons as recently as the 1970's.
But it would be interesting to learn how much of that traffic is represented by traditional bulk commodities like grain, ore and coal, and how much of it is "general cargo"; not much of the latter would be my guess.

The St Lawrence Seaway was envisioned in the days when general cargo was handled in the methods depicted in films like On the Waterfront; the development of internationally-interchangeable marine containers changed many of the rules.

The deregulation of the railroads similarly reduced costs on shipments to the interior from major container ports. The first major example of this involved traffic from the Port of Halifax to Chicago via the Canadian National -- which was not subject to the economic regulation still in force in the United States at that time. Since then, the playing field as been further levelled via American deregulation.

So I doubt that there would be much interest in the development of a container-port facility in Chicago -- involving a roundabout journey via Montreal, Detroit and Sault St Marie, when rail rates on container traffic are nearly as competitive on an FAK (freight-all kinds) basis
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