U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
View Poll Results: Do you feel that identifying as "European"-American is more prevelant in the Northeast tha
Yes 22 64.71%
No 12 35.29%
Voters: 34. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
Old 07-24-2017, 11:15 AM
 
122 posts, read 78,594 times
Reputation: 261

Advertisements

By "European" I mean the common European ancestry groups like Irish, Italian, Polish, etc. This seems to be a normal part of many Northeast cities like Boston, Philly, New York, and Pittsburgh but no where near as common in the West, Mid-West, and the South, where people are more likely to identify as American rather than as "Blank-American."
Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-24-2017, 11:27 AM
 
56,613 posts, read 80,910,543 times
Reputation: 12507
Yes and it is due to many being first to third generation Americans.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2017, 11:33 AM
 
11,172 posts, read 22,375,148 times
Reputation: 10924
Everyone I've ever met in the Midwest knows which ancestry they are, in Iowa it was big with Germans and Irish, my family was Swedish from the southwest part of the state. Chicago is big with Polish, Greek, Italians and Germans. My husband is from Detroit and his family is Polish. My friends from the west side of Michigan were Dutch.

This is common to the Midwest just as it is in the Northeast, I don't know why the west wouldn't. In the south it is by far the largest region where people identify with "American" more than their actual makeup, (German, British). I'm not entirely sure why this is a factor in the south and not the Northeast or Midwest.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...erican1346.gif

That tier through the south that's lighter in color is only so because it's the heart of the black belt, where people would put black as opposed to American, but for white-majority counties they're all down south or in the very southern areas of the Midwest.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-24-2017, 12:29 PM
 
350 posts, read 607,865 times
Reputation: 352
Like others said, European ancestry is usually third or fourth generation in the northern states (midwest and northeast) while European ancestry in the south is mostly dating back to 17th or 18th century.

It's too far remove to feel a connection and probably more mixed (mostly English and Scotch-Irish ancestry with a blend of diverse European roots). By the eve of the Revolutionary war, people from the interior country were already considered themselves American rather than English or Scottish.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 10:43 AM
 
122 posts, read 78,594 times
Reputation: 261
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chicago60614 View Post
Everyone I've ever met in the Midwest knows which ancestry they are, in Iowa it was big with Germans and Irish, my family was Swedish from the southwest part of the state. Chicago is big with Polish, Greek, Italians and Germans. My husband is from Detroit and his family is Polish. My friends from the west side of Michigan were Dutch.

This is common to the Midwest just as it is in the Northeast, I don't know why the west wouldn't. In the south it is by far the largest region where people identify with "American" more than their actual makeup, (German, British). I'm not entirely sure why this is a factor in the south and not the Northeast or Midwest.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Americ...erican1346.gif

That tier through the south that's lighter in color is only so because it's the heart of the black belt, where people would put black as opposed to American, but for white-majority counties they're all down south or in the very southern areas of the Midwest.
Yes I think I slightly discounted the Midwest, but especially Chicago, in the original post.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 05:57 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,763,005 times
Reputation: 8803
In New Orleans plenty of people are aware and talk about their Sicilian heritage and some people, their French heritage. They will still identify as "American" as opposed to a minority label.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 06:36 PM
 
2,006 posts, read 1,019,562 times
Reputation: 2672
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLawMan View Post
By "European" I mean the common European ancestry groups like Irish, Italian, Polish, etc. This seems to be a normal part of many Northeast cities like Boston, Philly, New York, and Pittsburgh but no where near as common in the West, Mid-West, and the South, where people are more likely to identify as American rather than as "Blank-American."
It doesn't matter what people identify as, they are what they are. If I say I'm a "Blank-American", what does that mean I am? I have German, English, Irish, and my husband's ancestors come from Belgium and Germany. I have several friends who are Scandinavian Americans, but it's not often discussed. We live in the Midwest, and no one I know really ever talks about their ancestry. Maybe when you first get to know someone, and you're curious....but otherwise, no.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 07:27 PM
 
Location: The Heart of Dixie
7,822 posts, read 12,328,370 times
Reputation: 4768
Quote:
Originally Posted by annie_himself View Post
In New Orleans plenty of people are aware and talk about their Sicilian heritage and some people, their French heritage. They will still identify as "American" as opposed to a minority label.
True that New Orleans is one of the few cities in the South that has seen the waves of Irish, Italian, and German immigration that the Northeast and Midwest saw. People in Cajun country tend to specifically identify as Cajun rather than "French" or "French Canadian" even though many do have that Acadian background. Most of the South didn't see large amounts of immigration until the second half of the 20th century and most of these came from Hispanic countries or Asia.

I know many people in West Virginia who just identify as "American" or "white" because they don't know their specific ancestry. However a surprising amount of people in WV are part Native American though they don't check that box.

In New Orleans and Baltimore it seems most white people are a heavy mix of the various ethnicities, often 3 or 4, while further up in the Northeast like NJ and NY you have large amounts of people with a single European ancestry. Its been pointed out that the Northeast is segregated not just on the racial level but on the ethnic level and in many parts of Boston and Rhode Island you are not welcomed unless you are specifically Irish, Italian, Jewish, etc. The Italians on Jersey Shore specifically wanted to hang out/date other Italians for example.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 08:34 PM
 
Location: Denver
14,151 posts, read 19,763,005 times
Reputation: 8803
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
True that New Orleans is one of the few cities in the South that has seen the waves of Irish, Italian, and German immigration that the Northeast and Midwest saw. People in Cajun country tend to specifically identify as Cajun rather than "French" or "French Canadian" even though many do have that Acadian background. Most of the South didn't see large amounts of immigration until the second half of the 20th century and most of these came from Hispanic countries or Asia.

I know many people in West Virginia who just identify as "American" or "white" because they don't know their specific ancestry. However a surprising amount of people in WV are part Native American though they don't check that box.

In New Orleans and Baltimore it seems most white people are a heavy mix of the various ethnicities, often 3 or 4, while further up in the Northeast like NJ and NY you have large amounts of people with a single European ancestry. Its been pointed out that the Northeast is segregated not just on the racial level but on the ethnic level and in many parts of Boston and Rhode Island you are not welcomed unless you are specifically Irish, Italian, Jewish, etc. The Italians on Jersey Shore specifically wanted to hang out/date other Italians for example.
I think there are remnants of that behavior in New Orleans as well, a good friend of mine calls himself a Italian and a good bit of good friends do the same. Nothing like up north though.
Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-25-2017, 10:40 PM
 
Location: Minneapolis, MN
6,061 posts, read 3,386,291 times
Reputation: 7710
Yea but I see it more as a Northern thing because I notice it in the Midwest, too.
Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


 
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:
Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > General U.S.
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top