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Old 07-26-2017, 06:38 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,287,883 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
I see both sides, but definitely more of the bad. It fixes up neighborhoods sure, but it doesn't really help the people already there. Seems nowhere is safe now considering there's even luxury apartments popping up in southeast DC.

The apartments obviously don't have those residents in mind. They market to professional people who want to move to DC but need "cheap", and they're counting on those current southeast residents to make their way out to Maryland. Then they can hike the rent even higher now the neighborhood is "trendy."

Also gentrification doesn't really erase crime, it just pushes it somewhere else. That's why more focus should be put on improving lives of the people already living there, rather than trying to price them out.
I agree with everything you say but unfortunately for cities, there's really no other options. Unless you bring in money which would mean a larger tax base and revenue stream, you won't improve an area. I personally have not heard of any success stories with creating affordable areas that stay affordable and that has resulted in creating a commercially viable area. Unfortunately $$ runs our economy.
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Old 07-26-2017, 06:45 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,904,644 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I agree with everything you say but unfortunately for cities, there's really no other options. Unless you bring in money which would mean a larger tax base and revenue stream, you won't improve an area. I personally have not heard of any success stories with creating affordable areas that stay affordable and that has resulted in creating a commercially viable area. Unfortunately $$ runs our economy.
Columbia and Greenville. Not only have the cities improved, but because of weird annex laws, the richest tax base lives just outside the city.

Both cities are growing, Greenville the fastest outside of Texas, and both have brought in jobs and investment, and are doing things with crime without resorting to pushing everyone somewhere else.
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Old 07-26-2017, 06:53 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Columbia and Greenville. Not only have the cities improved, but because of weird annex laws, the richest tax base lives just outside the city.

Both cities are growing, Greenville the fastest outside of Texas, and both have brought in jobs and investment, and are doing things with crime without resorting to pushing everyone somewhere else.
From what I've read, aren't the prices going up in the areas? I work in the commercial real estate industry and I don't much about Columbia but I know Greenville commercial values have increased a pretty significant amount... As those cities notoriety goes up so will their prices.
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Old 07-26-2017, 07:21 PM
 
Location: 352
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Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
From what I've read, aren't the prices going up in the areas? I work in the commercial real estate industry and I don't much about Columbia but I know Greenville commercial values have increased a pretty significant amount... As those cities notoriety goes up so will their prices.
Not because of gentrification though. Columbia has gone the infill and repurpose route. Greenville is knocking down old buildings and rebuilding, house flipping, and repurposing rather than flat out textbook gentrification, which Charleston is suffering from.

For instance, Greenville has taken some old empty mills around town and converted them into luxury lofts. Columbia has taken old factories and mills and turned them into Publix, restaurants, etc. That's not gentrification. Charleston is building luxury apartments on land right in the middle of the projects. That is gentrification. And the luxury apartment I'm specifically talking about is next to an overpass where a tent city was, and they'll surely be charging $1,000+ a month.

And not so much Columbia, but Greenville has been getting notarized for a while. It's been popping up on this and that list like Charleston. The prices are going up in the cores of course, but both cities are still pretty affordable in general and below the average COL.

And like I said, both cities are still lacking a chunk of that suburban wealth. There are more people with a Greenville address that live outside the city than do.

Last edited by Jandrew5; 07-26-2017 at 07:41 PM..
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Old 07-26-2017, 07:22 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
Not because of gentrification, which is the point. Columbia has gone the infill route. Greenville is doing more rehabbing and house flipping rather than flat out textbook gentrification, which Charleston is suffering from.

And not so much Columbia, but Greenville has been getting notarized for a while. It's been popping up on this and that list like Charleston.

The prices are going up in the cores of course, but both cities are still pretty affordable in general and below the average COL.
Well, hopefully they stay that way. I have my doubts but good luck. It wasn't long ago Atlanta was the token affordable Southern destination.
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Old 07-26-2017, 07:37 PM
 
Location: 352
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Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Well, hopefully they stay that way. I have my doubts but good luck. It wasn't long ago Atlanta was the token affordable Southern destination.
I edited my post to add some examples. And if both keep doing what they're doing, theyll be fine. Greenville I will keep my eye on, but it won't get Atlanta bad. Nothing to worry about with Columbia. USC will take over the city before the rich does.
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Old 07-27-2017, 06:16 AM
 
Location: Denver
14,157 posts, read 19,820,750 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Lennox 70 View Post
When I was in Charlotte and its suburbs, it felt absolutely no different than the Northern Virginia suburbs of DC (which are overrun with transplants) nor much different than Columbus or the suburbs of Cincinnati. Politically CHarlotte has also become a liberal city with high Democrat turnout due to transplants and immigrants. I actually was in Charlotte in the same trip where I was in Charleston SC and Savannah and its like night and day. In terms of Southern hospitality, friendliness, religion, church attendance, voting patterns, pace of life, etc much of southern WV and eastern Kentucky are more Southern than Charlotte.
Those aren't traits required to be southern. Those are just southern traits. By your logic, I live up north too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
I agree with everything you say but unfortunately for cities, there's really no other options. Unless you bring in money which would mean a larger tax base and revenue stream, you won't improve an area. I personally have not heard of any success stories with creating affordable areas that stay affordable and that has resulted in creating a commercially viable area. Unfortunately $$ runs our economy.
There's definitely other options, but money talks. Invest in the people there and you'll see the difference, there isn't a city in this country that has done that. And creating affordable housing isn't investing in people.
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Old 07-27-2017, 08:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Well, hopefully they stay that way. I have my doubts but good luck. It wasn't long ago Atlanta was the token affordable Southern destination.
You can have investment without gentrification, or at least without massive gentrification. I'd say the West End in Atlanta and Bronzeville in Chicago are good examples of that.
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Old 07-27-2017, 08:21 AM
 
500 posts, read 258,559 times
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
You can have investment without gentrification, or at least without massive gentrification. I'd say the West End in Atlanta and Bronzeville in Chicago are good examples of that.
As far as the West End in Atlanta, I wonder if mass gentrification will happen once the new segment of the beltline opens? Could you imagine the west end transforming into what O4W and the east side hoods have become.
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Old 07-27-2017, 09:23 AM
 
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Originally Posted by NC2ATL60 View Post
As far as the West End in Atlanta, I wonder if mass gentrification will happen once the new segment of the beltline opens? Could you imagine the west end transforming into what O4W and the east side hoods have become.
I have no doubt that there will definitely be an uptick. I saw signs of it before I left Atlanta in 2015.
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