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Old 07-30-2017, 02:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post

Buffalo is an interesting case. While being the poster child of urban decay, the city has some really exceptional architecture and is home to a surprisingly fertile art scene. The residents (the ones who haven't moved to New York City, Fort Lauderdale, and Scottsdale) embrace their city for what it is. You'll see t-shirts and bumper stickers reading "Buffalove" and the more cynical but equally charming "Buffalo Hates You Too." But is this true acceptance or is it overcompensation for an insecurity?
Acceptance or overcompensation? I think that applies to every city, actually. The old "Talkin' Proud" period of the 1970s was definitely an overcompensation, and has since given way to acceptance (or non-acceptance in many cases) of the city's strengths without overlooking (or overemphasizing) its weaknesses.

The nickname, "The City of No Illusions" sums up the city and its residents best.

https://mmorgulis.artspan.com/lg_vie...hp?aid=1454231
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Old 07-30-2017, 03:21 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
Oklahoma City also comes to mind. There's nothing spectacular or noteworthy about OKC, and the people who live there are just fine with that. There's also nothing bad about OKC either. The people are down-to-earth and welcoming, and you won't come across the "$30,000 millionaires" that are ubiquitous in nearby Dallas.
I would disagree here. OKC punches well below its weight considering its metro population of 1.3 million and is better compared with cities between about 500,000 and 900,000 in their metros. It always seems to be playing catch up. The culture may be "down to earth" but it's also not very accepting of outsiders or diverse ideas (especially if you aren't a Republican or evangelical Christian).

Tulsa is a good notch above OKC in terms of urban offerings and I would say it is the more "secure" city. OKC has a real inferiority complex given the kind of perception most of the country has about this place. It's understandable. People tend to be extremely sensitive to even the slightest criticism of the place, even if the criticism is valid.
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Old 07-30-2017, 04:34 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,523,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IcomeInPeaceDolphLundgren View Post
Louisville seems like an awesome city.
It has some great selling points, but like all places, it does have negatives as well!

For a large metro, it's very affordable. Has some great "urban" areas, a great food scene, and it's currently growing and experiencing some great economic "boom".

The big negative for me, is it is land locked. Nearest ocean/beach is about 9-10 hours, and the mountains are a couple hours away as well. Also, the summer is rather brutal, very hot with a lot of humidity.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,510,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I would disagree here. OKC punches well below its weight considering its metro population of 1.3 million and is better compared with cities between about 500,000 and 900,000 in their metros. It always seems to be playing catch up. The culture may be "down to earth" but it's also not very accepting of outsiders or diverse ideas (especially if you aren't a Republican or evangelical Christian).

Tulsa is a good notch above OKC in terms of urban offerings and I would say it is the more "secure" city. OKC has a real inferiority complex given the kind of perception most of the country has about this place. It's understandable. People tend to be extremely sensitive to even the slightest criticism of the place, even if the criticism is valid.
I've never been to Tulsa, but I've heard great things! I'm sure life will lead me there eventually.

I agree that OKC punches below its weight, but my point was that people who live there didn't strike me as insecure about that reality (unlike people from, say, Cleveland).

As far as the point about religion and politics, I'm a gay, left-leaning Quaker. And while Evangelical Republicans are obviously the majority in Oklahoma, four days in OKC introduced me to more like-minded peers than four years in Upstate New York. Perhaps OKC is so Evangelical and conservative that it's easy to identify people who are not.

I've also found that in blue states, many people might say they're liberal but are merely following the crowd; they don't actually live by their professed ideologies. In places like OKC, you don't have to sift through the posers (at least if you're liberal) to find folks who live their lives true to their beliefs.

I'd take Louisville, Missoula, Lawrence, or Salt Lake City over San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, or New York City.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:35 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
I would disagree here. OKC punches well below its weight considering its metro population of 1.3 million and is better compared with cities between about 500,000 and 900,000 in their metros. It always seems to be playing catch up. The culture may be "down to earth" but it's also not very accepting of outsiders or diverse ideas (especially if you aren't a Republican or evangelical Christian).

Tulsa is a good notch above OKC in terms of urban offerings and I would say it is the more "secure" city. OKC has a real inferiority complex given the kind of perception most of the country has about this place. It's understandable. People tend to be extremely sensitive to even the slightest criticism of the place, even if the criticism is valid.
What? OKC is very accepting.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:36 PM
 
2,001 posts, read 1,015,925 times
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It's amazing, to me, how there is this tendency to anthropomorphize cities on this site. People who think they speak for a city are interesting, as well, and that everyone living in said city, thinks the same, act the same, and are less than, unless it's on a coast. There are examples here, everywhere, to illustrate my point. I fall prey to it, when I respond to people who think they know me, because I live in a certain part of the country. You know what, it's just for conversation, because you don't speak for me, my neighbor, or my city. Nor, do you know us...you only think that you do.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:38 PM
 
Location: Oklahoma City
742 posts, read 719,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dawn.Davenport View Post
I've never been to Tulsa, but I've heard great things! I'm sure life will lead me there eventually.

I agree that OKC punches below its weight, but my point was that people who live there didn't strike me as insecure about that reality (unlike people from, say, Cleveland).

As far as the point about religion and politics, I'm a gay, left-leaning Quaker. And while Evangelical Republicans are obviously the majority in Oklahoma, four days in OKC introduced me to more like-minded peers than four years in Upstate New York. Perhaps OKC is so Evangelical and conservative that it's easy to identify people who are not.

I've also found that in blue states, many people might say they're liberal but are merely following the crowd; they don't actually live by their professed ideologies. In places like OKC, you don't have to sift through the posers (at least if you're liberal) to find folks who live their lives true to their beliefs.

I'd take Louisville, Missoula, Lawrence, or Salt Lake City over San Francisco, Seattle, Boston, or New York City.
I've lived in OKC for exactly 2 years now, and as a bisexual liberal, I've also found and met many more like-minded people than not.
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Old 07-30-2017, 05:48 PM
 
56,565 posts, read 80,847,919 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketSci View Post
Acceptance or overcompensation? I think that applies to every city, actually. The old "Talkin' Proud" period of the 1970s was definitely an overcompensation, and has since given way to acceptance (or non-acceptance in many cases) of the city's strengths without overlooking (or overemphasizing) its weaknesses.

The nickname, "The City of No Illusions" sums up the city and its residents best.

https://mmorgulis.artspan.com/lg_vie...hp?aid=1454231
I also don't know if it is the poster child for urban decay, given Detroit's rep. Now if Buffalo can start the "Buffalo vs. Everybody/Everyone" trend like they have in Detroit and put on T-shirts. Oops, it is already out and may be a common theme for "Rust Belt" cities: https://pearlstreetgrill.com/psg15/w...RYBODY-TEE.png
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Old 07-30-2017, 06:45 PM
 
Location: Erie, PA
337 posts, read 303,766 times
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Cleveland comes to mind. They know what makes them great without trying to sound like NYC, DC or Chicago.
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Old 07-30-2017, 07:00 PM
 
1,295 posts, read 1,199,984 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I also don't know if it is the poster child for urban decay, given Detroit's rep.
It changes over time - Camden, South Bronx, Atlantic City, Gary, Flint, East St. Louis, etc...
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