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Old 08-03-2017, 09:46 AM
 
7,719 posts, read 4,575,226 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kyle19125 View Post
Cheap has varying definitions and $1450 a month isn't "cheap" in most books.
He asked, specifically, for studios under $1000 and I named the neighborhoods where they could be found. Don't believe me? Hop on craigslist.
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Old 08-04-2017, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Seattle
410 posts, read 246,759 times
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A couple things to think about:

Many smaller cities have public transportation but it isn't as frequent; i.e. it's mostly for getting to and from work. If you are more of a homebody, you could always pick a smaller metro and live close to your job and a grocery store, and use the bus occasionally. The price will be cheaper but mobility will be less, though if you can swing an occasional Uber or Lyft ride it is tolerable.

Also, depending on where you end up, there may be workforce housing. For example, in Seattle there is housing that is income qualified but not "public housing" or Section 8, so the environment is a little better. I lived next door to one of the buildings and it was perfectly fine. It runs slightly under market, and the rent only incrementally increases. Capitol Hill Housing and Bellwether in Seattle do this. You have to pass a background check and not have a criminal record, and decent credit. Your disability may also make you eligible for something. Seattle is probably more expensive than you want, but other cities may have this, it is worth looking into.

For cities with good public transit that are affordable, I'd look in the upper Midwest as suggested above.
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Old 08-04-2017, 12:21 PM
 
2,099 posts, read 768,896 times
Reputation: 2260
Atlanta
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Old 08-04-2017, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,514,573 times
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OP: What are your thoughts about urban cycling? If your vision doesn't affect your ability to ride a bike, you'll find yourself with a lot more possibles.

Are you male or female? Does your body attract unwanted attention? This will affect your options.

You say you don't care about weather, which is great; but, you may want to imagine what it might feel like to carry groceries home in January.
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Old 08-04-2017, 08:23 PM
 
22 posts, read 17,110 times
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I can/do ride a bicycle.
Male/nothing out of place

I plan to get my groceries delivered.
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Old 08-04-2017, 10:17 PM
 
Location: Auburn, New York
1,775 posts, read 2,514,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NawfalKulam View Post
I can/do ride a bicycle.
Male/nothing out of place

I plan to get my groceries delivered.
In this case, I think Minneapolis-St. Paul could be worth looking into. Overall, the cost of living is going to be less than Chicago or Philadelphia, but the area offers significantly more than other cities on your list like Milwaukee, Pittsburgh, Richmond, and Indianapolis. The economy is also doing well, and the Twin Cities are home to 18 Fortune 500 companies. So finding a job shouldn't be too difficult.

The most walkable neighborhoods are Loring Park, Uptown, Lyn-Lake, Dinkytown, and Seward in Minneapolis. You might also care to look into the Merriam Park and Selby-Dale neighborhoods in St. Paul. I bet all would meet your budget. While not as walkable, Northeast Minneapolis has unique charm that I enjoy but it might be a little isolated without a car.

In terms of public transportation, the bus system is extensive and reliable. There are two well used light rail lines with plans for further expansions. Minneapolis in particular is also very bike friendly (but perhaps not as much during winter).

Providence, Rhode Island might also be worth checking out.

Last edited by Dawn.Davenport; 08-04-2017 at 10:35 PM..
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Old 08-05-2017, 01:05 AM
 
Location: Land of Ill Noise
956 posts, read 1,775,737 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Chicago. You can find a studio for under $1000 in Lakeview, Edgewater, Uptown, Roscoe Village, West Town, Ravenswood. These are all safe, walkable North Side neighborhoods with lots of options for young people. Hyde Park and Kenwood are safe walkable South Side neighborhoods with lots of amenities, but it you're not affiliated with UofC, they can feel a bit isolated from the rest of the city.

Chicago will probably offer you better career opportunities than other cities in that price range.
At least Hyde Park and Kenwood aren't totally cut off, and do have Metra train and CTA bus service connecting it to other parts of Chicago. That area used to even have CTA Green Line service too(at 63rd/Stony Island), but CTA foolishly demolished the line east of Cottage Grove years ago. Including the part between Cottage Grove to Dorchester, back in the 1990s all because of one outspoken pastor who whined about the 'L causing that area to be blighted. Stupidly the city sided with him over residents, and it was demolished. Including that the CTA had to forfeit federal money, that was supposed to go to 'L station renovations.

One city not mentioned yet was either Minneapolis, or Saint Paul. That area has a lot of things going for it, including light rail lines going to various parts of that city, plus Amtrak(just one long distance train a day, but it does connect that city with Seattle, Portland, western Montana including Glacier National Park, La Crosse, Milwaukee, and Chicago among other places) and airplane service. Other than how cold that area gets in the winter, I can't see a lot of negatives about living there.

If you don't mind that there's only bus service(MCTS) and a just starting downtown streetcar system, Milwaukee is also very nice too. Has a great local restaurant and bar scene, and a lot of nice local things such as breweries, a really great art museum(Milwaukee Art Museum), and also local things to do(i.e. summer festivals). MCTS is to its credit a bus system with routes all over the city and to nearby suburbs, bus service that runs every day(even on Sundays and holidays), and that the routes even run late at night. I've never had issues taking the buses, when I just took Amtrak Hiawatha north to Milwaukee to spend a day there, and wanted to get over to some of its neighborhoods outside downtown. The neighborhoods to the north and west(towards Marquette University) of that city are pretty walkable, IMO. I personally like the area north of downtown Milwaukee the most, but that's just my personal preference.
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Old 08-05-2017, 04:30 PM
 
2,099 posts, read 768,896 times
Reputation: 2260
Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
In terms of Buffalo, you can find some rentals for around and under $1000 near the rail line, which goes by Medaille College, Canisius College and ends at the University of Buffalo's South Campus. Areas west of Main Street to about Richmond Avenue in the city, which includes the Buffalo State College would be an area to look into as well.

https://www.apartments.com/apartment...y11x1ouIx44l0V
You can not live in Buffalo without a car. No way.
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Old 08-05-2017, 05:05 PM
 
56,674 posts, read 80,973,859 times
Reputation: 12526
Quote:
Originally Posted by cttransplant85 View Post
You can not live in Buffalo without a car. No way.
In certain parts of the city, it is possible. It has a rail/subway line along Main Street and many of the neighborhoods west of Main(North Buffalo(particularly around Hertel Avenue), Allentown, Elmwood Village and the very dense suburb of Kenmore) are walkable, with quite a few amenities. So, it is possible.

Last edited by ckhthankgod; 08-05-2017 at 05:17 PM..
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