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Old 08-04-2017, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,211,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
I believe that the poster is referring to resources and Upstate NY would be a top 15 state in population if it was its own state. Just the I-90 corridor portion of Upstate NY alone(regions from Albany to Buffalo) would be on par with states such as OR and SC in terms of population currently. So, there are more people in Upstate NY than people may realize.
I don't doubt what you say, but I'm talking about the fact that a number of cities and towns in Upstate NY are economically depressed, and they've been that way for a long time.
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Old 08-04-2017, 03:31 PM
 
3,230 posts, read 1,560,833 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
I don't doubt what you say, but I'm talking about the fact that a number of cities and towns in Upstate NY are economically depressed, and they've been that way for a long time.
That's the Northeast and Midwest in general. I can vouch for central PA too. Kentucky and Tennessee more rural regions were especially in the past. Probably less so today in moderate winters and other sunbelt attributes has it gain interest in growth and their economies.

We have to remember the North was the powerhouse and it had the furthest to fall too. No one doubts Southern regions growing over the north today. Corporate America gets better deals in no or low Corporate tax States and generally lower wages paid. So where THEY CHOOSE to build or re-locate? It has to gain workers to follow. Also seeking milder winters is still in fashion....
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Old 08-04-2017, 03:43 PM
 
9,388 posts, read 9,554,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
I don't doubt what you say, but I'm talking about the fact that a number of cities and towns in Upstate NY are economically depressed, and they've been that way for a long time.
However Climate Change will not submerge Buffalo by 2035 or so Miami as well as large swaths of the coastal south, since the land is subsiding, coupled with sea level rise, will be uninhabitable, or at least an unwise investment.
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Old 08-04-2017, 03:49 PM
 
56,696 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
I don't doubt what you say, but I'm talking about the fact that a number of cities and towns in Upstate NY are economically depressed, and they've been that way for a long time.
Some are and some aren't, with most metros having median household incomes around the national figure, give or take. Dave Pa's post makes a great point in terms of being a part of an area that was so strong economically for so long.
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Old 08-04-2017, 04:36 PM
 
Location: Seattle WA, USA
3,956 posts, read 2,224,167 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
Wow .... 7 of the Top 12 are in Florida alone and 3 more after that..... 3 in Utah too in the top 12. Sunbelt and Winterbelt LOL.

Texans won't be happy? Only Dallas at 24 made the list. Some cities have booming cores but less so their whole city and metro.

Who doesn't love the tropical flavor of Florida.
don't forget the rain/cloud belt, Seattle is in 7th
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Old 08-04-2017, 04:37 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,211,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DavePa View Post
That's the Northeast and Midwest in general. I can vouch for central PA too. Kentucky and Tennessee more rural regions were especially in the past. Probably less so today in moderate winters and other sunbelt attributes has it gain interest in growth and their economies.

We have to remember the North was the powerhouse and it had the furthest to fall too. No one doubts Southern regions growing over the north today. Corporate America gets better deals in no or low Corporate tax States and generally lower wages paid. So where THEY CHOOSE to build or re-locate? It has to gain workers to follow. Also seeking milder winters is still in fashion....
No argument from me that many wages are lower in the south, but "lower wages" are relative. I grew up in Ontario, Canada (Toronto) where auto workers, for example, are paid more than they are in Michigan, a state with a very similar COL. In my profession, I make less in the south than I would in the north, but I'd also make more in Ontario than I would in NY State. In Canada, it is generally recognized that salaries for many occupations are lower in the US.
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Old 08-04-2017, 07:53 PM
 
56,696 posts, read 81,017,273 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by newdixiegirl View Post
No argument from me that many wages are lower in the south, but "lower wages" are relative. I grew up in Ontario, Canada (Toronto) where auto workers, for example, are paid more than they are in Michigan, a state with a very similar COL. In my profession, I make less in the south than I would in the north, but I'd also make more in Ontario than I would in NY State. In Canada, it is generally recognized that salaries for many occupations are lower in the US.
Cost of living tends to be higher in Toronto in comparison as well. Michigan's overall COL is average, if not a little below the national average. Same for upstate NY.
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Old 08-04-2017, 08:42 PM
 
Location: Nashville, TN
5,746 posts, read 3,211,786 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ckhthankgod View Post
Cost of living tends to be higher in Toronto in comparison as well. Michigan's overall COL is average, if not a little below the national average. Same for upstate NY.
I've lived in Michigan and southern Ontario. COL is very comparable. The only difference is housing costs, and that's only if you compare, say, Detroit with Toronto specifically, and not neighboring cities in southern Ontario. Metro Detroit (and Michigan, as a whole) is considerably more expensive than people tend to think it is.

Higher education costs are MUCH higher in Michigan, as they are throughout the US, and that's a biggie. You'll also have medical costs that you won't have in Toronto. Car insurance rates in Michigan are among the highest in the US, and that's significant, because there's also no public transit. That means that a typical family is forced to have 2+ cars (if your kids are driving). More vehicles=more insurance costs. Of course, more vehicles also=more gas. Ka-ching. Ka-ching.

Families in Toronto can manage much more easily with one car, because they supplement their transportation needs (especially the teenagers) with public transit. It is rare in Toronto for teenagers to receive their own cars. In suburban Detroit, it's practically the norm.

Other costs in Michigan that we wouldn't have had in Ontario included costs of preschool/junior kindergarten. In Ontario, as in most of Canada, ECE is considered very important in a child's healthy development and socialization. So preschools tend to be well-subsidized, and junior kindergarten is part of the public school system in most districts.

In Michigan, however, where parents are just as concerned about their children's education and development, they have to pay for ECE out of their own pockets. It gets expensive, even for very part-time programs, which is what I had my kids in.

Last edited by newdixiegirl; 08-04-2017 at 08:54 PM..
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Old 08-04-2017, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Washington State desert
5,563 posts, read 3,709,954 times
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These stats, or polls/surveys come out every year. One thing that tends to repeat is, yes, Florida, but also Seattle and Portland.
This seems to be a constant. Texas is still strong, but when you stack everything up, they are dropping, just a tiny bit. Texas is still a growth monster.
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