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Old 08-06-2017, 02:27 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,656 posts, read 7,462,978 times
Reputation: 4327

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I understand that many individuals look for specific requirements to be met when searching for the perfect, ideal locale. I also see many posters toss around comments about how certain cities are not urban enough, not walk-able, not this/not that, etc. I even see some posters make these types of comments in threads that compare larger cities like Chicago, Los Angeles for example. What are the absolute requirements that must be met by your ideal city in order for you to be personally satisfied with it? What happens when these needs are met? Is the bar set higher then? Do you see yourself as someone who has many needs that must be continuously met or someone who can try to make the best out of any situation regardless of the locale?
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Old 08-06-2017, 03:04 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,532,405 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
I understand that many individuals look for specific requirements to be met when searching for the perfect, ideal locale. I also see many posters toss around comments about how certain cities are not urban enough, not walk-able, not this/not that, etc. I even see some posters make these types of comments in threads that compare larger cities like Chicago, Los Angeles for example. What are the absolute requirements that must be met by your ideal city in order for you to be personally satisfied with it? What happens when these needs are met? Is the bar set higher then? Do you see yourself as someone who has many needs that must be continuously met or someone who can try to make the best out of any situation regardless of the locale?
America is full of greedy spoiled brats who can never have enough. Millennials are especially guilty of this, myself included. I think I'm way more "reasonable" than most by far though.

I hate living in the Bay Area, but yet I'm here making the best of it until we can relocate again. My needs are simple. A safe area, with stuff to do, and a decent job market for my field of work. I need to be able to provide a good life for myself and my wife. Sure, I have many "wants", but they're not needs

Last edited by BurnInTheMil; 08-06-2017 at 03:25 PM..
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Old 08-06-2017, 03:23 PM
 
4,497 posts, read 2,686,554 times
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My #1 is an ability to live a great life without a car, and without relying on Uber etc.

That means a high degree of walkability over a large core area, good transit for most of the metro, and decent bike routes.

For ethical/global reasons as well as local/pragmatic ones, the region should cut down substantially on sprawl also.

I need a full-service downtown...the greater downtown area should be a top retail area, the center of office jobs, a place tourists can get lost in, a great place for groceries, full of local businesses, etc. The ability to not commute (and have many thousands of like-minded others doing the same) is crucial.

A feeling of urban intensity is a bonus but pretty important to me too. I need places where the sidewalks are jammed with people.
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Old 08-06-2017, 03:43 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
5,656 posts, read 7,462,978 times
Reputation: 4327
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
My #1 is an ability to live a great life without a car, and without relying on Uber etc.

That means a high degree of walkability over a large core area, good transit for most of the metro, and decent bike routes.

For ethical/global reasons as well as local/pragmatic ones, the region should cut down substantially on sprawl also.

I need a full-service downtown...the greater downtown area should be a top retail area, the center of office jobs, a place tourists can get lost in, a great place for groceries, full of local businesses, etc. The ability to not commute (and have many thousands of like-minded others doing the same) is crucial.

A feeling of urban intensity is a bonus but pretty important to me too. I need places where the sidewalks are jammed with people.
But, why? Can you be a little more specific?
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:14 PM
 
Location: Downtown & Brooklyn!
2,123 posts, read 1,315,503 times
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I'm definitely on the extreme end of this. I definitely love the city life. I really realized after spending a few years in the suburbs. The more urban the better IMO.

Anyway the BARE MINIMUM for me would be:
1. Large city limits
2. City is walkable and not designed to be completely reliant on cars for most of the entirety of city limits, not just downtown/CBD.
3. Expansive subway system with express service. Should be the ideal and most common method of getting around the city.
4. A good, and also varied nightlife scene. Nightlife areas with a lot of foot traffic and pedestrian street activity.
5. City stays open late. Not just nightlife, but other things too.
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:21 PM
 
4,497 posts, read 2,686,554 times
Reputation: 4115
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
But, why? Can you be a little more specific?
As I alluded, jammed sidewalks is a bonus. I like the urban feel.

As for downtowns tourists can get lost in, that implies downtowns that are full of things to do, places to eat, etc. Someone could argue that food is food so who cares, but being able to walk to hundreds of different places of dozens of types is important to me.

Regarding many thousands of others not commuting (I really meant walking to work), that brings a far more intense level of services that makes my life much easier.
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Old 08-06-2017, 04:51 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,117 posts, read 4,155,253 times
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Good question. Here is what is ideal for me.

*LGBT friendly (unfortunately I am currently stuck in one of the few cities left that isn't)
*Walkable downtown with critical mass. Something like Charlotte, Dallas, Nashville, or Kansas City would work for me. A place where you can live downtown and not have to drive out into the burbs for basic, everyday needs. I am not really that hard to please.
*1.5 million metro population or higher (though there are a few smaller metros I would be okay with). 1.5 million, to me, is about the right size where a place has enough amenities you don't feel too limited. 2+ million is ideal
*It would be nice to have mass transit such as a functional light rail system or streetcar
*Some kind of natural beauty; be it the ocean, a river, mountains, or even a forest

I think perspective has a lot to do with it. Something like Charlotte for instance will feel very big to somebody from a small metro area but it feels small to somebody from a Tier I city.

Currently, the small city I live in is suffocating to me and doesn't meet any of my criteria. The ultra-conservative culture is perhaps the worst part of it, but even aside from that, there is very little to like about the place.
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Old 08-06-2017, 06:57 PM
 
2,293 posts, read 1,301,223 times
Reputation: 1525
bawac34618, you currently live in Oklahoma City?
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Old 08-06-2017, 07:52 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,117 posts, read 4,155,253 times
Reputation: 7748
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tim Randal Walker View Post
bawac34618, you currently live in Oklahoma City?
Correct.
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Old 08-07-2017, 09:53 PM
 
482 posts, read 252,457 times
Reputation: 1196
Quote:
Originally Posted by AZLiam View Post
I understand that many individuals look for specific requirements to be met when searching for the perfect, ideal locale. I also see many posters toss around comments about how certain cities are not urban enough, not walk-able, not this/not that, etc. I even see some posters make these types of comments in threads that compare larger cities like Chicago, Los Angeles for example. What are the absolute requirements that must be met by your ideal city in order for you to be personally satisfied with it? What happens when these needs are met? Is the bar set higher then? Do you see yourself as someone who has many needs that must be continuously met or someone who can try to make the best out of any situation regardless of the locale?
Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
My #1 is an ability to live a great life without a car
Bingo.

Cities can always improve, but I believe many lovers of urban living would find themselves mostly content if at least half of the major U.S. cities were designed to accommodate pedestrians rather than cars.

Americans go gaga over places like New York and San Francisco largely because those are among the few stateside cities where people can consistently have a great time and have access to innumerable wonderful amenities -- all without a car.

When we visit European cities and see their rich histories and cultures up close, we rave about them. But the biggest common denominator in our reviews of most of those places is how much we love being able to walk and/or use transit as primary modes of mobility when we so desire.

Beginning around the early 2000s this country as a whole started to re-awaken. More cities began to slowly but surely add modern, convenient, and effective public transit options (i.e. they began upgrading to light rail over their pitiful traditional, non-express bus systems). Cities all over the country are making huge strides. But we're so far behind the curve, and our politics are so toxic, that even if we do catch up to other counties it'll take a century or more.

I'm not trying to be dramatic, but in public transit we're seriously behind enough that it could indirectly lead to the long-term decline of the American Empire.
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