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Old 09-10-2017, 08:22 AM
 
Location: livin' the good life
2,148 posts, read 3,671,329 times
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This link says Charlotte, NC is #1 in US city for millennials net growth.
https://smartasset.com/mortgage/wher...als-are-moving
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Old 09-10-2017, 12:35 PM
 
Location: North Dakota
7,737 posts, read 9,030,452 times
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Do people still relocate? It seems like people just move back in with their parents after college these days. Or after a job loss. Or after a divorce. Or when anything gets tough.
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Old 09-10-2017, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Jackson, Mississippi
204 posts, read 162,948 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pine to Vine View Post
This list was compiled by Joel Kotkin, a proponent of sprawling suburban-style urban development. His list has as much validity as any other list. But like other lists, the bias and preferences in any type of research need to be understood. Within this very thread, you have two very different outcomes in studies proclaiming millennial preferences, both from the same magazine.
Like it or not, suburbs still have plenty of young people plenty of contributing to the economy. Rich, young 18-34 year olds may prefer urban life or traditional urbanism or Transit-Oriented Development, but in general, most 18-34 year-olds still can't afford to live city center or in walkable, and possibly transit-acessible neighborhoods because the cost of living is too high and there are too few areas that would not be considered suburban-style development.

I particularly favor Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox because they at least recognize the strides the South has come in emerging as a global powerhouse despite many of its residents having to overcome poverty and the struggle to gain civil rights and despite the region having to overcome many stereotypes in order to be seen, at least in most states, as a decent place to live and do business.

Their report gives credit to the region's largest metropolitan areas, Houston, Dallas, Miami, and Atlanta, having emerged as Alpha Global Cities and contributing greatly to the American Economy and the having significance in the Global Economy. The report, "Size is not the Answer: The Changing Face of the Global City", may be found at this link: http://https://www.cscollege.gov.sg/...obal-City.aspx
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Old 09-10-2017, 04:08 PM
 
4,485 posts, read 2,670,613 times
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Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox are apologists for the sprawl industry.

Regarding where millennials move, there's a big difference between where high-earning or hipster millennials move vs. where the masses move.
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Old 09-14-2017, 09:00 PM
 
10,558 posts, read 13,118,508 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Joel Kotkin and Wendell Cox are apologists for the sprawl industry.

Regarding where millennials move, there's a big difference between where high-earning or hipster millennials move vs. where the masses move.
I think this is right. I would love to see an analysis of where the young and highly educated live.
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Old 09-14-2017, 09:25 PM
 
2,508 posts, read 2,271,845 times
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When it comes to educated millineals and what cities are best for them and where they are also moving to, most studies show the same cities...

"IN OUR MAIN ANALYSIS, WE FIND THAT DIVERGING PREFERENCES FOR CONSUMPTION AMENITIES—SUCH AS RETAIL, ENTERTAINMENT AND SERVICE ESTABLISHMENTS—EXPLAIN THE DIVERGING LOCATION DECISIONS OF THE YOUNG AND COLLEGE-EDUCATED RELATIVE TO THEIR NON-COLLEGE-EDUCATED PEERS AND THEIR OLDER COLLEGE-EDUCATED COUNTERPARTS.

IN THE SAME MODEL, WE FIND LIMITED EVIDENCE THAT FACTORS LIKE CHANGES IN URBAN RELATIVE TO SUBURBAN NEIGHBORHOOD CHARACTERISTICS, TASTES FOR LIVING IN CLOSE PROXIMITY TO JOB LOCATIONS, OR WILLINGNESS-TO-PAY FOR HOUSING HELP TO EXPLAIN WHY

THE YOUNG AND COLLEGE-EDUCATED ARE MOVING DOWNTOWN IN BIG CITIES, WHILE THE REST OF THE COUNTRY IS MOVING INTO THE SUBURBS.
"
Entertainment Amenities by Metro Area (top cites)
Portland
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Boulder
Nashville
New York
Madison
Wilmington
Boston
Minneapolis
Austin
Chicago
Washington, D.C.

Arts, Entertainment and Restaurant Establishments Per Capita
https://www.americaninno.com/boston/...they-choose-2/

"The chart below summarizes income and Redfin sale price statistics for the 20 ZIP codes with the highest population of educated millennials. To buy in these neighborhoods at or near the lowest mortgage rates, the average down payment is $80,000."

https://www.redfin.com/blog/2014/09/...ls-live-2.html


According to Business Insider
"The 10 best big cities for educated millennials.

The young and educated are interested in more than just a hefty paycheck.

In a new report on the top destinations for young college graduates, the American Institute for Economic Research finds young people are drawn to city amenities in addition to jobs.

The rankings examined eight economic and quality-of-life factors that young people look for in a new city, the top three factors being: high density of people with a college degree, a low unemployment rate, and the ability to get around the city without a car.

The other factors included: average salary, cost of rent, competition for jobs, bars and restaurants per 1,000 residents, and racial and ethnic diversity.

Washington, DC topped the list of most desirable large cities for educated young people. The report defined young educated people as those 22 to 35 years old with at least a bachelor's degree, and it defined "large" cities as those having metro areas with at least 1 million people.

Here are the top 10 major cities for young educated people:

10. Raleigh, North Carolina
Metro area population: 1.2 million Surrounded by strong schools such as Duke, located in Durham, Wake Forest in Winston Salem, and UNC Chapel Hill in Chapel Hill, it's no surprise that Raleigh would appeal to young, educated people.

9. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota
Metro area population: 3.5 million The writer Matthew Yglesias has summed up why Minneapolis would be the perfect place for young people; incomes are relatively high there and the cost of living is low. "You should move to Minneapolis," he wrote in Slate back in 2012.

8. Austin, Texas
Metro area population: 1.9 million Austin has an obvious allure for young professionals with its vibrant music and tech scene that culminates every March in South by Southwest. The American Institute for Economic Research Report noted that many startups are drawn to Austin's "vibrant" downtown area.

7. Denver, Colorado
Metro area population: 2.7 million Millennials (those born between 1981 and 1997) now make up the largest population group in metro Denver, a region that experienced "robust job growth" in 2014, according to the Metro Denver Economic Development Corporation.


6. Seattle, Washington
Metro area population: 3.6 million Residents enjoy a strong social scene with many bars and restaurants to choose from. Seattle has also been called the new "center of the tech boom," with companies like Amazon and Microsoft bringing many jobs to the area.

5. New York City, New York
Metro area population: 19.9 million Unsurprisingly, the largest city offers one of the most diverse populations. It also provides an attractive mix of walking, biking, and public transportation; 39.1% of commuters are not dependent on a car, the largest percentage out of all cities.

4. San Jose, California
Metro area population: 1.8 million The paychecks in San Jose are larger than any other major metro, averaging out to $79,331 per year for 22- to 35-year-olds.

3. Boston, Massachusetts
Metro area population: 4.7 million With MIT, Harvard, and Tufts all in the vicinity, Boston is a mecca for some of the world's most educated people.
It's not a surprise that many people educated in Boston would choose to settle down in a city where there's plenty to do and relatively easy to get around without a car. Nearly 20% of commuters don't depend on a car, compared to just 2.6% for Raleigh, which is 10 on this list.

2. San Francisco, California
Metro area population: 4.5 million While the median rent in San Francisco is among the highest in the nation at $1,850 per month, it has a booming technology industry and offers high earnings. The average millennial earns $72,622 each year.

1. Washington, DC
Metro area population: 5.8 million The top-ranked major city offers an abundance of government, professional, and technical jobs, in addition to a vibrant downtown area with several cultural and social opportunities.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-b...or-jobs-2015-5

Last edited by Ebck120; 09-14-2017 at 09:35 PM..
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Old 09-15-2017, 06:50 AM
 
29,940 posts, read 27,375,616 times
Reputation: 18470
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Entertainment Amenities by Metro Area (top cites)
Portland
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Boulder
Nashville
New York
Madison
Wilmington
Boston
Minneapolis
Austin
Chicago
Washington, D.C.
Wilmington???? Makes no difference if it's the DE or NC city, that one is a head-scratcher.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:33 AM
Status: "Summer!" (set 19 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,002 posts, read 102,592,596 times
Reputation: 33059
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Entertainment Amenities by Metro Area (top cites)
Portland
San Francisco
Los Angeles
Boulder
Nashville
New York
Madison
Wilmington
Boston
Minneapolis
Austin
Chicago
Washington, D.C.



The young and educated are interested in more than just a hefty paycheck.
LOL, Boulder! Population barely>100,000 with an MSA of 294,000!

The bold is what was said about us Boomers when we were 20somethings. See how that worked out.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:35 AM
 
2,508 posts, read 2,271,845 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Wilmington???? Makes no difference if it's the DE or NC city, that one is a head-scratcher.
It's DE for sure and I assume it's because of its proximity to Philly and competing to keep its population.
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Old 09-15-2017, 07:53 AM
 
2,508 posts, read 2,271,845 times
Reputation: 1829
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
LOL, Boulder! Population barely>100,000 with an MSA of 294,000!

The bold is what was said about us Boomers when we were 20somethings. See how that worked out.
The #'s are all per capital not raw #.
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