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Old 09-15-2017, 12:34 PM
 
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...wherever millennials are moving to, DON'T LIVE THERE!!! That is, unless you want your cost of living to shoot up ridiculously, your traffic and commute time to drastically increase, your local culture to be mocked and snuffed out, and want to probably eventually just be priced out of being able to live there in general.
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Old 09-15-2017, 12:47 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
...wherever millennials are moving to, DON'T LIVE THERE!!!
So don't live in any of our top cities....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
That is, unless you want your cost of living to shoot up ridiculously
But you're chances of having a better paying job and prosperous career are much higher

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
your traffic and commute time to drastically increase
That's why you live in an urban setting and have amenities within walking distance

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Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
your local culture to be mocked and snuffed out
Mimic'd and envy'd more likely

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mentallect View Post
and want to probably eventually just be priced out of being able to live there in general.
well, if you can't make it then.....I say move along to your next destination. It's a competitive world and if that's not your thing or you don't have the skill sets ---- unfortunately that's just how things go.
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:04 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Nibbidy View Post
I wonder what changed all that?
If I recall from an article I read, corrupt politics on the Memphis side and how each city chose to spend it's money. Memphis went for corporate recruiting while Nashville went for public funding.
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:12 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,027 posts, read 102,689,903 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
however it is less of a priority to the Millineal generation then previous generations.

The marriage rate of 18-32yo by generation:
Millineal 26%
Gen X 36%
Boomer 48%
Silent 65%
https://webcache.googleusercontent.c...&ct=clnk&gl=us

A recent report titled The Changing Economics and Demographics of Young Adulthood: 1975-2016 published by the US Department of Commerce found that most young adult Americans believe “that educational and economic accomplishments are extremely important milestones of adulthood”.

As well as this, over half of Americans in the demographic believe marrying and having children “are not very important in order to become an adult”.
Millennials are shunning marriage and children for education and a career, says report | The Independent
Didn't find that info about marriage rates in your first link.

Here's what I did find, straight from Pew:
"For the 20 to 34 age group, the share of households that include unmarried partners increased from 12 to 16 percent since 2000. But the share of married couples is declining faster than that, dropping from 45 to 37 percent of households during that time.

Between 2007 and 2016, the share of 20- to 34-year-olds living with a partner, married or unmarried, has dropped from 49 to 43 percent, said Steven Ruggles, a demographer at the University of Minnesota who wrote a study of marriage and cohabitation among young couples last year."

For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait

Now few 20 year olds were married, even when I was a young Boomer in the early 70s. So by including the very youngest of the Mills, the marriage numbers are somewhat artifically lowered.

Re: your second link, you cherry picked. Here's what you conveniently left out:
"In the 1970s eight of 10 people married by the age of 30, nowadays it is not until the age of 45 that eight out of ten people are married. The report suggested their findings suggest “young adults are not necessarily giving up on marriage, They are waiting longer.” "

And in point of fact, college educated women are more likely to get married than their less educated counterparts.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/socia...to-be-married/

And this, from just three hours ago: https://qz.com/1078725/university-an...ew-study-says/


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
yeah and the article stated what those other priorities are based on the study by the American Institute for Economic Research. You can't really be doubting that the Millennial generation priorities marriage and kids less then any previous generation?


"The young and educated are interested in more than just a hefty paycheck.

In a new report on the top destinations for young college graduates, the American Institute for Economic Research finds young people are drawn to city amenities in addition to jobs.

The rankings examined eight economic and quality-of-life factors that young people look for in a new city, the top three factors being: high density of people with a college degree, a low unemployment rate, and the ability to get around the city without a car.

The other factors included: average salary, cost of rent, competition for jobs, bars and restaurants per 1,000 residents, and racial and ethnic diversity."
I'm sorry, this just cracks me up. That's what they said about us older Boomers, too, although I personally wasn't concerned about bars and restaurants per 1000 residents when I was a young, single Boomer. Maybe these Mills today are all future alcoholics?
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:22 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Didn't find that info about marriage rates in your first link.

Here's what I did find, straight from Pew:
"For the 20 to 34 age group, the share of households that include unmarried partners increased from 12 to 16 percent since 2000. But the share of married couples is declining faster than that, dropping from 45 to 37 percent of households during that time.

Between 2007 and 2016, the share of 20- to 34-year-olds living with a partner, married or unmarried, has dropped from 49 to 43 percent, said Steven Ruggles, a demographer at the University of Minnesota who wrote a study of marriage and cohabitation among young couples last year."

For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait

Now few 20 year olds were married, even when I was a young Boomer in the early 70s. So by including the very youngest of the Mills, the marriage numbers are somewhat artifically lowered.

Re: your second link, you cherry picked. Here's what you conveniently left out:
"In the 1970s eight of 10 people married by the age of 30, nowadays it is not until the age of 45 that eight out of ten people are married. The report suggested their findings suggest “young adults are not necessarily giving up on marriage, They are waiting longer.” "

And in point of fact, college educated women are more likely to get married than their less educated counterparts.
https://www.brookings.edu/blog/socia...to-be-married/

And this, from just three hours ago: https://qz.com/1078725/university-an...ew-study-says/




I'm sorry, this just cracks me up. That's what they said about us older Boomers, too, although I personally wasn't concerned about bars and restaurants per 1000 residents when I was a young, single Boomer. Maybe these Mills today are all future alcoholics?
Do me a favor and search "millennial marriage rate" on google and look at the entire first page. It's all about how marriage rates are falling, or low, or why millennials are prioritizing other items in life.

I thought it was a pretty common topic that Millennials are not marrying or buying up homes like previous generations. This isn't news so I'm surprised anyone is refuting this.... :/

Can I ask where you live? This might be why everyone around you is getting married? I'm a millennial and marriage and kids are definitely not a priority in my circle of friends in any of the cities I've lived in.

Below are the first few links that comes up.

Why Millennials Refuse to Get Married
NowUKnow: Why Millennials Refuse to Get Married | PreparedU View | Bentley University
Here's why millennials aren't choosing to get married
Here's why millennials aren't choosing to get married - Business Insider
For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait
For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait | HuffPost
Gallup Analysis: Millennials, Marriage and Family - 59% of millennials are single and have never been married, 60% of millennials do not have any children under 18 in their household
Gallup Analysis: Millennials, Marriage and Family | Gallup

Last edited by Ebck120; 09-15-2017 at 01:33 PM..
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:50 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Yes, but if said prosperous city A and prosperous city B were to purposely attract Millennials, based on this study, the city with more amenities is more likely the successor of the two. Also, the stated priorities in the study do not reflect every prosperous city i.e. high density of college educated & getting around the city without a car and no, the existence of a metro system and/or some sort of light rail does not count if most of it's citizens still drive since clearly it's an indication that mass transit does not suffice in that area.
And it's most likely going to be the city with more higher-paying jobs, because in those cities folks have more disposable income to spend on those amenities.

It just seems weird to make the argument that Millenials want more than a hefty paycheck and then turn around and talk about all the stuff they want to spend money on or the ways they can save money (transit). It would have been different if it was said that they want more recreational opportunities or they were seeking a higher spiritual purpose or something like that. It still comes back to money.
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Old 09-15-2017, 01:55 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
And it's most likely going to be the city with more higher-paying jobs, because in those cities folks have more disposable income to spend on those amenities.

It just seems weird to make the argument that Millenials want more than a hefty paycheck and then turn around and talk about all the stuff they want to spend money on or the ways they can save money (transit). It would have been different if it was said that they want more recreational opportunities or they were seeking a higher spiritual purpose or something like that. It still comes back to money.
thats why I said prosperous city A and prosperous city B, meaning the same level of incomes etc..

it makes sense to me... if a millennial (just stating as one example, not generalizing all) was offered 110k in City A that has minimal mass transit, less amenities and overall less appealing but was offered 100k in City B that has good mass transit, lots of amenities and is very appealing, I could see why including myself anyone would settle for City B. For me this would provide a higher quality of life. My friend recently turned down a higher paying job in Omaha to take a slightly less paying job in Chicago because he just couldn't fathom living in Omaha.. It's like settling for a BMW 3 Series instead of getting the top notch Camry...it might not make sense to everyone but it happens all the time.
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:02 PM
Status: "Summer!" (set 26 days ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,027 posts, read 102,689,903 times
Reputation: 33083
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Do me a favor and search "millennial marriage rate" on google and look at the entire first page. It's all about how marriage rates are falling, or low, or why millennials are prioritizing other items in life.

I thought it was a pretty common topic that Millennials are not marrying or buying up homes like previous generations. This isn't news so I'm surprised anyone is refuting this.... :/

Can I ask where you live? This might be why everyone around you is getting married? I'm a millennial and marriage and kids are definitely not a priority in my circle of friends in any of the cities I've lived in.

Below are the first few links that comes up.

Why Millennials Refuse to Get Married
NowUKnow: Why Millennials Refuse to Get Married | PreparedU View | Bentley University
Here's why millennials aren't choosing to get married
Here's why millennials aren't choosing to get married - Business Insider
For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait
For Many Millennials, Marriage Can Wait | HuffPost
Gallup Analysis: Millennials, Marriage and Family - 59% of millennials are single and have never been married, 60% of millennials do not have any children under 18 in their household
Gallup Analysis: Millennials, Marriage and Family | Gallup
Just because you think you're right, that doesn't mean you are.

Ha, ha, I live in one of those "High Millennial" cities, Denver. Actually, I live in the burbs, but so does my daughter who lives there, too, and virtually all of her friends.

Try looking at the actual research, and not what some reporter writes up about the studies. Any article with inflammatory language such as "refuse to get married", replete with quotes from opinion pieces should be discounted on that alone. (Yes, I looked at all of them, but "Business Insider" wouldn't let me read their article because I'm using an ad blocker.) #3 includes some of the same material I used from the Pew article, but with the Huffpo's spin on it. Here's what #4 says: "Millennials are clearly delaying marriage longer than any generation before them, in spite of evidence suggesting that many millennials intend to marry at some point. For example, a 2013 Gallup poll found that 86% of single/never married Americans aged 18 to 34 (roughly equivalent to the millennial generation) wanted to get married someday."
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:05 PM
 
29,949 posts, read 27,441,480 times
Reputation: 18544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
thats why I said prosperous city A and prosperous city B, meaning the same level of incomes etc..

it makes sense to me... if a millennial (just stating as one example, not generalizing all) was offered 110k in City A that has minimal mass transit, less amenities and overall less appealing but was offered 100k in City B that has good mass transit, lots of amenities and is very appealing, I could see why including myself anyone would settle for City B. For me this would provide a higher quality of life. My friend recently turned down a higher paying job in Omaha to take a slightly less paying job in Chicago because he just couldn't fathom living in Omaha.. It's like settling for a BMW 3 Series instead of getting the top notch Camry...it might not make sense to everyone but it happens all the time.
Well I get that, people want nice things to spend their money on. Money is a means to an end and nobody wants to have it for its own sake. Perhaps if that article emphasized social networks, I'd see the validity of the argument.
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Old 09-15-2017, 02:05 PM
 
2,517 posts, read 2,280,503 times
Reputation: 1855
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Just because you think you're right, that doesn't mean you are.

Ha, ha, I live in one of those "High Millennial" cities, Denver. Actually, I live in the burbs, but so does my daughter who lives there, too, and virtually all of her friends.

Try looking at the actual research, and not what some reporter writes up about the studies. Any article with inflammatory language such as "refuse to get married", replete with quotes from opinion pieces should be discounted on that alone. (Yes, I looked at all of them, but "Business Insider" wouldn't let me read their article because I'm using an ad blocker.) #3 includes some of the same material I used from the Pew article, but with the Huffpo's spin on it. Here's what #4 says: "Millennials are clearly delaying marriage longer than any generation before them, in spite of evidence suggesting that many millennials intend to marry at some point. For example, a 2013 Gallup poll found that 86% of single/never married Americans aged 18 to 34 (roughly equivalent to the millennial generation) wanted to get married someday."
I think you're misunderstanding here. I never stated that Millennials never want to marry or don't have any desire to. I said they are prioritizing other things in life..... it's obvious that as Millennials get older marriage will play a bigger role but even still I bet we will see the largest segment of elderly singles who never married from this generation.
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