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Old 09-16-2017, 06:36 PM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,268,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
As do I. Having that ability, is not exclusive to any generation. Tech savvy pretty much equates to extremely strong math skills, if you want to really get somewhere. Some of my family members have advanced degrees in math and computer science...they're the ones who have had very long careers in this field. Some people can have "skills", but to actually go anywhere, these degrees are pretty much the ticket.
Agreed. Definitely not exclusive to any generation. Millineals just have the advantage of having grown up with it. Whether one is tech savvy or not doesn't matter without the drive or ability to utilize it for success.
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Old 09-17-2017, 09:48 AM
 
394 posts, read 308,575 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
I think it's important to make the distinction. When I was a kid I got to watch the Great Recession happen. The older tail end of the generation was in their 20s when it happened. But those then 20 year olds spent their childhood in one of the best economic conditions this country has seen. I think fundamentally we are a bit different.
Personally from my observation, I would say, there is a noticeable divide between millennials born 93' and later and those born between 82'-92'. Those born between 85'-89' are the forgotten/silent millennials. We probably had the biggest mental hit since the recession hit early into our post-secondary education or right when one was graduating college. Many of the traits associated with the millennial generation encompass those in there mid 20's and younger. When they talk about older millennials, the focus is usually on those around 34-35. I Think millennials in their late 20's and early 30's tend to get lumped with the younger millennials even though we tend to have the mindset of the oldest millennials.

With us older millennials depending on what demographic group you belong to that great prosperity didn't really trickle into our childhood although better than our parents. Our younger siblings on the other hand had/have a better childhood economically than us.

Also I've been considering buying a house for the last two years but I'm just not ready to pull the trigger. I agree with the poster on avoiding 'hot' cities for millennials. I think another market correction is on the horizon with housing prices whether people believe it or not. I think mid-size cities with a decent growth and job rate are probably the best bang for the buck as far as quality of life and economic practicality.

Last edited by dc1538; 09-17-2017 at 10:04 AM..
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Old 09-17-2017, 10:44 AM
 
4,481 posts, read 2,663,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Agreed. Definitely not exclusive to any generation. Millineals just have the advantage of having grown up with it. Whether one is tech savvy or not doesn't matter without the drive or ability to utilize it for success.
Much of the current tech growth is happening in places where driving is optional. My second-tier city has thousands of techies earning six figures but not having cars. The typical highrise apartment with $2,500 rents has far fewer parking spaces than units.
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Old 09-17-2017, 10:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
Much of the current tech growth is happening in places where driving is optional. My second-tier city has thousands of techies earning six figures but not having cars. The typical highrise apartment with $2,500 rents has far fewer parking spaces than units.
Yes but people seem to get irritated when you lump Millineals into one bucket even for "generally speaking" purposes so I preface this as not all millinneals but rather looking at trends, the educated millinneal tends to prefer more urban type environments where having a car is an option and not a necessity... this is evidenced by a majority, i didnt say all, of the top cities educated millineals are moving to and all those best cities for Millineals studies take this as a major factor in their results.

Last edited by Ebck120; 09-17-2017 at 11:29 AM..
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Old 09-17-2017, 11:26 AM
 
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It's hard to guess about majorities, but I agree that a large chunk of certain millennial types prefer cities -- high-earning professionals, hipsters of various kinds, and so on.

Where people move isn't necessarily where they want to live. It works in both directions. Maybe they choose cities because the jobs are there. Maybe they choose suburbs because they're "driving til they qualify" or think their kids will do better there.

The demographic story really doesn't have to be about majorities at all. Maybe a 80-20 split in preferences in 1990 would be 70-30 or 60-40 today. That would be a massive shift.
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Old 09-17-2017, 11:32 AM
 
2,507 posts, read 2,268,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhays25 View Post
It's hard to guess about majorities, but I agree that a large chunk of certain millennial types prefer cities -- high-earning professionals, hipsters of various kinds, and so on.

Where people move isn't necessarily where they want to live. It works in both directions. Maybe they choose cities because the jobs are there. Maybe they choose suburbs because they're "driving til they qualify" or think their kids will do better there.

The demographic story really doesn't have to be about majorities at all. Maybe a 80-20 split in preferences in 1990 would be 70-30 or 60-40 today. That would be a massive shift.
I think moving for work is one part of two. I think there is a specific lifestyle they are seeking which usually only comes in an urban form; work, play and live close by and be surrounded by similar demographics. That "similar demographic is currently transforming all of the urban areas to slowly resemble one another.
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Old 09-18-2017, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,572 posts, read 17,544,804 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Personally from my observation, I would say, there is a noticeable divide between millennials born 93' and later and those born between 82'-92'. Those born between 85'-89' are the forgotten/silent millennials. We probably had the biggest mental hit since the recession hit early into our post-secondary education or right when one was graduating college. Many of the traits associated with the millennial generation encompass those in there mid 20's and younger. When they talk about older millennials, the focus is usually on those around 34-35. I Think millennials in their late 20's and early 30's tend to get lumped with the younger millennials even though we tend to have the mindset of the oldest millennials.

With us older millennials depending on what demographic group you belong to that great prosperity didn't really trickle into our childhood although better than our parents. Our younger siblings on the other hand had/have a better childhood economically than us.

Also I've been considering buying a house for the last two years but I'm just not ready to pull the trigger. I agree with the poster on avoiding 'hot' cities for millennials. I think another market correction is on the horizon with housing prices whether people believe it or not. I think mid-size cities with a decent growth and job rate are probably the best bang for the buck as far as quality of life and economic practicality.
Excellent post and I think part of what generation you identify with depends on your own experiences.

I was born in 86. One of my starkest college memories were watching the markets crumble back in 2008. I didn't have my act together and it took me another two years to graduate. I only had low end jobs from 2010-early 2014 because that was all I could find. My first "professional track" job didn't come until 2014, and I turned 28 the month after I took that job. I was 28 and about where I should have been at 23. I've recovered pretty well since then, but those first four years out of college were really rough, and I had to move from Tennessee to the Midwest, twice, to get enough skills to find a job in this state.

I have friends that were settled in their careers before the recession hit. Those people, many of whom are government or healthcare employees, were able to ride out the storm in relative calm. They have a much more old fashioned mindset.

Like you, I'm not comfortable buying a home. I live in my small hometown that has a weak job market. If I were to lose my current job, I'd probably have my pay cut by a third to just stay in the area. Housing prices are cheap, but that means nothing if you have no job. The flip side of that is many of the most desirable cities are completely unaffordable unless you're a top 10%er or so.
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Old 09-19-2017, 01:20 PM
 
Location: Tempe, AZ
4,552 posts, read 3,637,492 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Personally from my observation, I would say, there is a noticeable divide between millennials born 93' and later and those born between 82'-92'. Those born between 85'-89' are the forgotten/silent millennials. We probably had the biggest mental hit since the recession hit early into our post-secondary education or right when one was graduating college. Many of the traits associated with the millennial generation encompass those in there mid 20's and younger. When they talk about older millennials, the focus is usually on those around 34-35. I Think millennials in their late 20's and early 30's tend to get lumped with the younger millennials even though we tend to have the mindset of the oldest millennials.

With us older millennials depending on what demographic group you belong to that great prosperity didn't really trickle into our childhood although better than our parents. Our younger siblings on the other hand had/have a better childhood economically than us.

Also I've been considering buying a house for the last two years but I'm just not ready to pull the trigger. I agree with the poster on avoiding 'hot' cities for millennials. I think another market correction is on the horizon with housing prices whether people believe it or not. I think mid-size cities with a decent growth and job rate are probably the best bang for the buck as far as quality of life and economic practicality.
Yeah I'm on the tail end of the Millennials being in 95 which is usually the cut off year that I've seen for Millennials, it's pretty agreed upon on that year. The articles I am constantly reading "Millennials are KILLING the diamond industry!!" "Millennials are KILLING THE SUBURBAN MALL!!!" are generally geared towards me and my peers, at least from what I gather.

In my teenage years during the Great Recession I had to help contribute bills for a short time and so did my older brother while we were downgrading houses significantly. Parents were never unemployed but they moved jobs a lot significantly. I knew a lot of people who lost their homes that were in my classes (I was one of the richer kids in my high school).

Most jobs I'm seeing here in Phoenix (so not a """hot""" city) are about $15/hr for entry-level work. Most of it call center related. At 15/hr I could probably spend 500 on rent safely each month? Of course I didn't do the math there... but you cannot find a place with that low of rent. Maybe a 4 bedroom and live with a minimum of 3 other people in a single family you could. But the average apartment is at least a 1000/month. To get a place with public transit as an option without a 2 hour one way commute you are looking at 1300/month and up. So in reality whether it is a trendy city or not rents aren't affordable, period. The key word is city. Rural areas don't have this problem. This is what happens when wages have been stagnant since the 80s for political reasons while people kept raising housing costs because housing is not just shelter, but investments. Housing can never be just a need that is necessary to live for all people, we must make money off of it...

------

As far as housing I know I can get a better deal if I even bought a one bedroom condo or a small house than I would renting the same place. With that being said I'm going to save up for one once I get a decent job, and try to qualify for the FHA loan and see if that helps out... One of my high school friends who graduated with me got a house almost right after high school with the FHA and rents out the spare bedrooms to friends bringing his mortgage down to an affordable rate. I am going to try to do that too.
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Old 09-23-2017, 06:46 AM
 
Location: Windsor Ontario/Colchester Ontario
1,500 posts, read 1,351,181 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Prickly Pear View Post
Yeah I'm on the tail end of the Millennials being in 95 which is usually the cut off year that I've seen for Millennials, it's pretty agreed upon on that year. The articles I am constantly reading "Millennials are KILLING the diamond industry!!" "Millennials are KILLING THE SUBURBAN MALL!!!" are generally geared towards me and my peers, at least from what I gather.

In my teenage years during the Great Recession I had to help contribute bills for a short time and so did my older brother while we were downgrading houses significantly. Parents were never unemployed but they moved jobs a lot significantly. I knew a lot of people who lost their homes that were in my classes (I was one of the richer kids in my high school).

Most jobs I'm seeing here in Phoenix (so not a """hot""" city) are about $15/hr for entry-level work. Most of it call center related. At 15/hr I could probably spend 500 on rent safely each month? Of course I didn't do the math there... but you cannot find a place with that low of rent. Maybe a 4 bedroom and live with a minimum of 3 other people in a single family you could. But the average apartment is at least a 1000/month. To get a place with public transit as an option without a 2 hour one way commute you are looking at 1300/month and up. So in reality whether it is a trendy city or not rents aren't affordable, period. The key word is city. Rural areas don't have this problem. This is what happens when wages have been stagnant since the 80s for political reasons while people kept raising housing costs because housing is not just shelter, but investments. Housing can never be just a need that is necessary to live for all people, we must make money off of it...

------

As far as housing I know I can get a better deal if I even bought a one bedroom condo or a small house than I would renting the same place. With that being said I'm going to save up for one once I get a decent job, and try to qualify for the FHA loan and see if that helps out... One of my high school friends who graduated with me got a house almost right after high school with the FHA and rents out the spare bedrooms to friends bringing his mortgage down to an affordable rate. I am going to try to do that too.
I've always read that the cut off year for Millenials is 1999, 1995 is way too early, and would leave that generation with only a 13 year span! Most generations are around 18 or 19 years in span!
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Old 09-23-2017, 08:02 AM
 
Location: Cleveland, OH
453 posts, read 732,899 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dc1538 View Post
Personally from my observation, I would say, there is a noticeable divide between millennials born 93' and later and those born between 82'-92'. Those born between 85'-89' are the forgotten/silent millennials. We probably had the biggest mental hit since the recession hit early into our post-secondary education or right when one was graduating college. Many of the traits associated with the millennial generation encompass those in there mid 20's and younger. When they talk about older millennials, the focus is usually on those around 34-35. I Think millennials in their late 20's and early 30's tend to get lumped with the younger millennials even though we tend to have the mindset of the oldest millennials.

With us older millennials depending on what demographic group you belong to that great prosperity didn't really trickle into our childhood although better than our parents. Our younger siblings on the other hand had/have a better childhood economically than us.

Also I've been considering buying a house for the last two years but I'm just not ready to pull the trigger. I agree with the poster on avoiding 'hot' cities for millennials. I think another market correction is on the horizon with housing prices whether people believe it or not. I think mid-size cities with a decent growth and job rate are probably the best bang for the buck as far as quality of life and economic practicality.
Absolutely agree and I am in the same boat also.

Don't want to pull the trigger on buying the house as I think "another market correction" is due - either it is a perception form the 2007/8 trauma that we have experienced, or it is the geopolitical and economic uncertainty that we live in. I think a lot of my colleagues are in this boat also.

I also agree with the statement that the classification of the generation is too broad. My brother and I belong to the same generation of "millennials" but our mind sets, attitudes, and perceptions are very different since we are 8 years apart.
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