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Old 08-09-2017, 08:33 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,849 posts, read 2,975,563 times
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I've never been to Pittsburgh, but it looks beautiful, is dense, is close to a lot of major cities, has quite a few universities, and in a city that is limited in size, that's important. It's also still cheapish, so I can see it on the rise. Lot to like, I would imagine.
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:50 PM
 
5,452 posts, read 2,292,432 times
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Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
it's a forum that discusses all aspects of cities..... no need to play your moral card. Like you said, this is cyclical so what's uncool today could be cool tomorrow.
It's not immoral. It's just kind of stupid.
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Old 08-09-2017, 09:34 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
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Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Likewise people from places like Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg move to Charlotte.
Nothing against Charlotte but I think lot of people in Charlotte would like to live in Greenville or Columbia. Greenville especially is more 'cool', in my view, and a ton of people living here have moved here from bigger cities.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 08-09-2017 at 09:50 PM..
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:11 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,879,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Nothing against Charlotte but I think lot of people in Charlotte would like to live in Greenville or Columbia. Greenville especially is more 'cool', in my view, and a ton of people living here have moved here from bigger cities.
In my millennial experience, Charlotte has pouched many of my friends and classmates from Greenville and Columbia, and elsewhere. Charlotte is more hip than CD wants to give it credit for.

Greenville and Columbia have not been most people's first choices, the bigger cities are, but for the ones in Gville and Cola, they're content. Greenville is fine, but I don't think most people in Charlotte are giving it that much thought, especially when Charlotte is already hot itself.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:20 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,879,218 times
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Originally Posted by Ebck120 View Post
Just for reference - not sure about cool or uncool but..



https://www.apartmentlist.com/renton...lation-trends/
According to this chart, Atlanta is bleeding millennials. That doesn't make any sense or sound right to me. Can anybody explain this? Because Atlanta isn't exactly Oldpeopleville and jobs aren't scarce and dry. Nor is COL a cripple.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:24 PM
 
2,506 posts, read 2,268,209 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
According to this chart, Atlanta is bleeding millennials. That doesn't make any sense or sound right to me. Can anybody explain this? Because Atlanta isn't exactly Oldpeopleville and jobs aren't scarce and dry. Nor is COL a cripple.
Not sure why but I posted the below in another thread and Atlanta seems to be having a hard time recently attracting millenials.. there is just a mention of it not being the magnet it used to be below.

according to Nytimes

here a look at the % change in College graduate between 2000-2012

When young college graduates decide where to move, they are not just looking at the usual suspects, like New York, Washington and San Francisco. Other cities are increasing their share of these valuable residents at an even higher rate and have reached a high overall percentage, led by Denver, San Diego, Nashville, Salt Lake City and Portland, Ore., according to a report published Monday by City Observatory, a new think tank.

And as young people continue to spurn the suburbs for urban living, more of them are moving to the very heart of cities — even in economically troubled places like Buffalo and Cleveland. The number of college-educated people age 25 to 34 living within three miles of city centers has surged, up 37 percent since 2000, even as the total population of these neighborhoods has slightly shrunk.

Some cities are attracting young talent while their overall population falls, like Pittsburgh and New Orleans. And in a reversal, others that used to be magnets, like Atlanta and Charlotte, are struggling to attract them at the same rate.

Percent change in the number of college graduates aged 25 to 34, from 2000 to 2012


Houston 50%
Nashville 48%
Denver 47%
Austin 44%
Portland 37%
Washington 36%
Buffalo 34%
Baltimore 32%
Los Angeles 30%
Pittsburgh 29%
St. Louis 26%
New York 25%

Top 51 metro areas, average 25%

Minneapolis 21%
Chicago 17%
Boston 12%
San Francisco 11%
Memphis 10%
Providence 6%
Atlanta 3%
Cleveland 1%
Detroit -10%


Source: Joe Cortright, City Observatory
https://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/20/u...g-to-live.html

And according to Time Magazine - not necessarily college grads but Millennials overall.

Rank Urban Area Millennial Change 2010-2015 (%) Millennial Change 2010-2015 (#)

1 Virginia Beach-Norfolk-Newport News, VA 16.4% 7,034
2 Richmond, VA 14.9% 5,176
3 Riverside-San Bernardino-Ontario, CA 11.7% 1,014
4 Memphis, TN-MS-AR 9.5% 1,714
5 New Orleans-Metairie, LA 8.5% 5,199
6 Austin-Round Rock, TX 6.6% 4,523
7 Pittsburgh, PA 6.6% 4,177
8 Baltimore-Columbia-Towson, MD 6.5% 7,740
9 Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA-NH 6.5% 15,549
10 Miami-Fort Lauderdale-West Palm Beach, FL 6.4% 9,633
11 Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD 6.2% 14,383
12 Buffalo-Cheektowaga-Niagara Falls, NY 6.0% 1,881
13 San Antonio-New Braunfels, TX 5.4% 3,665
14 Seattle-Tacoma-Bellevue, WA 5.2% 4,242
15 Salt Lake City, UT 4.8% 1,983
16 Raleigh, NC 4.2% 677
17 Jacksonville, FL 4.0% 1,112
18 Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC 4.0% 1,372
19 Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land, TX 3.9% 5,905
20 Providence-Warwick, RI-MA 3.8% 2,355
21 Tampa-St. Petersburg-Clearwater, FL 3.6% 2,171
22 Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV 3.4% 7,289
23 Columbus, OH 3.2% 1,606
24 Las Vegas-Henderson-Paradise, NV 2.9% 2,372
25 New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY-NJ-PA 2.5% 29,774
Millennials: See the Top 25 Cities Where They're Moving | Time.com

and one more according to Credible.

Key Takeaways:

While affordability might be one reason cities attract out-of-state graduates, a lack of affordability does not appear to be an issue preventing job centers like San Francisco, Seattle, Dallas, and Washington D.C. from attracting out-of-state grads.

However, affordability becomes more of an issue in recruiting out-of-state grads if they have large amounts of student loan debt.

College graduates who aren’t immediately looking to buy a home, or are satisfied with renting, may have fewer reservations about moving to cities like Washington D.C., San Francisco and Dallas, where homes are more expensive.

The nine cities where out-of-state graduates outnumbered in-state grads were:

1.Washington D.C. (2.20 out-of-state graduates for every in-state graduate),
2.Charlotte (2.17)
3.Denver (1.92 )
4.Portland (1.48)
5.Seattle (1.35)
6.San Francisco (1.22)
7.Oakland (1.19)
8.New York City (1.06)
9.Dallas (1.03)

https://www.cnbc.com/2016/04/01/coll...college-grads/
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:34 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,235,162 times
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Originally Posted by eschaton View Post
IMHO a city like Dallas, or Charlotte isn't cool because the primary reason people move down there is to get a job or to flee winter. You don't see people with no serious job prospects crossing the country to move to those cities because they've heard it has an amazing local music scene or because they think it's the perfect place to locate their online business or whatever. Trendy areas are those places people move to for the cultural scene.
I used to live in PA and never once did I encounter someone who wanted to live in Pittsburgh other than to attend school or for a job. Of course that can be outdated now, just like your outdated view of Dallas. I don't think either city is cool overall, but they do have cool aspects. Kind of a nice middle ground. I can't speak for the Pittsburgh music scene, but I know Dallas's is incredibly underrated and under the radar. And yes, a lot of people do relocate their online business to here.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:35 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Great points. Those are the kind of places I would consider middle ground. Cool things happen in Dallas and Charlotte. They aren't Portland or Denver, but they are still desirable places to live with some "cool" amenities. They are also the kind of cities that people from smaller cities in the region move to if they want urban life. A lot of young people who grow up in Oklahoma City who want a more urban and progressive environment but aren't quite ready to make the leap to Denver or Austin will move to Dallas. Likewise people from places like Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg move to Charlotte.
Those are all great if you're a "yuppie" or a "hipster," personally speaking I don't find those cities who attract those type of people as "cool."

It's a cool little subculture with some interesting people, but I don't want to constantly live around those type of people; after a while it gets boring and cliche. That's why I can't include Austin with cities like Portland or Pittsburgh because at least Austin has the proper foundation to attract millennials from multiple demographics, and being in Texas just makes it even better. Also, with Colorado legalizing Marijuana, that alone amped the cool factor of Denver...

IMO, I think "cool" cities are those like Atlanta, Miami, Houston, Chicago, DC, Oakland, LA, etc.
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,582 posts, read 3,994,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jandrew5 View Post
In my millennial experience, Charlotte has pouched many of my friends and classmates from Greenville and Columbia, and elsewhere. Charlotte is more hip than CD wants to give it credit for.

Greenville and Columbia have not been most people's first choices, the bigger cities are, but for the ones in Gville and Cola, they're content. Greenville is fine, but I don't think most people in Charlotte are giving it that much thought, especially when Charlotte is already hot itself.
I don't want to get into a Charlotte vs Greenville debate with you. Obviously you like bigger cities and no doubt people you know prefer big cities. I don't see anything about Charlotte that makes it more hip than Columbia or Greenville. The main difference is taller buildings, more people and more traffic. Greenville's location near the mountains and a downtown with a 30 foot waterfall with a massive suspension pedestrian bridge in a beautiful park right on a treelined Main Street makes it more cool in my view.

You have this premise that every millennial is the same and every one of them prefers big cities. And my comment wasn't specific to millennials.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 08-09-2017 at 10:53 PM..
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Old 08-09-2017, 10:36 PM
 
1,987 posts, read 1,235,162 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Great points. Those are the kind of places I would consider middle ground. Cool things happen in Dallas and Charlotte. They aren't Portland or Denver, but they are still desirable places to live with some "cool" amenities. They are also the kind of cities that people from smaller cities in the region move to if they want urban life. A lot of young people who grow up in Oklahoma City who want a more urban and progressive environment but aren't quite ready to make the leap to Denver or Austin will move to Dallas. Likewise people from places like Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg move to Charlotte.
Denver and Austin are smaller than Dallas, so I don't know why there would be more of a leap to them.
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