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Old 08-09-2017, 06:27 PM
 
75 posts, read 59,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MN_Ski View Post
There is a "coolness" cycle...as a 20 something who is pretty active in the urban nonsense that has been going on lately, here is my opinion.

"Cool" cities cannot be found with data, trends, or by what you see/hear in the media. A place is cool when it is under the radar, and the average Joe has no idea that it exists. The people who make a city cool are the college kids, artists, creatives, service industry workers, transients, musicians, etc...basically, people who would not be holding a white collar job any time soon. The people are fine sharing a 4-6 bedroom house, like they did in college. The cheaper the city, the better, as it allows people to act on their creative interests, and allows a "slacker" lifestyle.

Pre 2010, the cool cities were Denver, Portland, Austin, and Brooklyn (there were a few others as well). I remember seeing a lot of artists and photographers from these places posting stuff online, and remembering how laid back these places seemed. Social Media also wasn't in full force, so those living in these places had to seek it out, or sacrifice something in order to make the move.

After around 2012, the economy started to improved, Millennials were starting to graduate, and many core downtown's in cities were becoming "livable" again. Those slackers who moved themselves into these cheap areas, turned them into something special, and it started a cultural shift back into the cities.

Then the "boring suburban white people" started to get high paying jobs out of college, and wanted to flee from the white bread hell they have grown up in their whole life. They would see the posts on social media of people riding bikes around the city, going to breweries, growing beards, attending cool group events, etc. They wanted to join in on the fun that their "slacker" counterparts have been participating in. The difference is that when these people started to come in, they were coming in with money. They weren't moving somewhere to split a house with 4 people, and work a few service jobs. They had high incomes, or their parents money, to get themselves into the cool spots.

This is when gentrification started in full force. Developers knew that people with money wanted to move to the cities, so that started the luxury apartment boom, followed by the growth in high end restaurants and boutiques. We all know what happens next....when hordes and hordes of people with money want to live somewhere, they end up pushing out all of the existing residents that made those places cool in the first place. The small mom and pop shops that originally put these neighborhoods on the map, started to close down due to the high rent.

At that point, new companies wanted to move themselves where the educated people are moving to. This only accelerated the growth of these cities, as it allowed more people to move somewhere that gave them a good income. There was a problem with this though...all of this change has turned the cities into what everyone was trying to flee from. Downtown areas are slowly becoming the generic, pretentious, white bread, cookie cuter areas that hoards of Millennials were trying to flee for the last few years. By this point, the "average joe" is well aware of the trendy cities, and more and more people try to cram themselves into the fun. At this point...the city has lost it's cool.

So yes, I would say that Denver and Portland are now longer "cool", but are still very popular. There is a difference between the two.

From what I see currently, the current "cool" cities are Kansas City, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, Cincinnati, Buffalo, and Detroit. These are all affordable cities with so much potential. After visiting these places, the "slackers" have already started to do their thing, and it won't be long before the trends pick up, and the people over paying for their tiny little studio, in their cookie cuter gentrified neighborhood, will start to want to join in on the fun.


Here is a good way to test if a city is cool. Pick a place that seems to be growing, and objectively has a decent core. Tell any random person that you want to move there. If their reaction is something like "Your moving where"?!?!? ....then that city might be cool.

Sorry this is a long and exaggerated post. I'm also describing this as I hear it from others, not as any absolutes. Sorry if it's heavy on generalizations
I enjoyed reading this. Great post!
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Old 08-09-2017, 06:31 PM
 
57 posts, read 53,710 times
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It's not the cities themselves that are neither cool or uncool, every city has their cool and uncool parts.
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:08 PM
_OT
 
Location: Miami
2,146 posts, read 1,527,217 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gladhands View Post
Cool is incredibly subjective. For me cool centers around the and food scenes. I'm not going to argue that Pittsburgh is actually cool (although I think it is), my point is that it's modern reputation is cool:

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh | Travel + Leisure

https://brooklynbased.com/2015/04/24/move-pittsburgh/

https://www.thrillist.com/travel/nat...ity-pittsburgh

https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs...=.81438344e626

What are America's next hipster cities? - CultureMap Austin

Pittsburgh has a low cost of living, so creative types can actually live in IN the city. It's the kind of place where two people working in food service can buy a house in a safe neighborhood with transit. A young chef can actually open her own restaurant. These creatives make give the city an arts scene that makes the city desirable for yuppies and techbros.
See this is my point, that might be cool in Pittsburgh terms, but I don't see anywhere it includes or speaks for various demographics. The city is too busy trying to attract yuppies and hipsters; similar to cities like Portland and SLC in that link you posted...I find those cities to be "uncool."

Like I said before, I'm a very open-minded guy that likes to engulf in various cultures or demographics, but it's hard to do that in a city that doesn't embrace that.

For example, one is able to experience something like Speed Street and CIAA both in Charlotte; or being able to catch a function with a few paisas, or end up in an artistic neighborhood buying dreamcatchers or something in Dallas. I want to be able to experience or meet people from different cultures or demographics; whether it's someone who likes going to Music Festivals and eats at experimental restaurants, or someone one who likes going HBCU festivities and listens to SZA. I find that to be a cool experience.

Where is that in cities like Portland, SLC, or Pittsburgh?
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:37 PM
 
7,744 posts, read 4,590,691 times
Reputation: 8455
Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
See this is my point, that might be cool in Pittsburgh terms, but I don't see anywhere it includes or speaks for various demographics. The city is too busy trying to attract yuppies and hipsters; similar to cities like Portland and SLC in that link you posted...I find those cities to be "uncool."

Like I said before, I'm a very open-minded guy that likes to engulf in various cultures or demographics, but it's hard to do that in a city that doesn't embrace that.

For example, one is able to experience something like Speed Street and CIAA both in Charlotte; or being able to catch a function with a few paisas, or end up in an artistic neighborhood buying dreamcatchers or something in Dallas. I want to be able to experience or meet people from different cultures or demographics; whether it's someone who likes going to Music Festivals and eats at experimental restaurants, or someone one who likes going HBCU festivities and listens to SZA. I find that to be a cool experience.

Where is that in cities like Portland, SLC, or Pittsburgh?
Let me say, as someone who's actually attended a CIAA tournament, that there's nothing cool about the CIAA tournament. It's an excuse for my uncle with the Bluetooth earpiece to turn up for a couple of days.
I think it's rather presumptuous of you to think that Pittsburgh's art scene is some whites-only affair. A couple weeks ago I had guests from out of town to the kickoff event of a joint exhibition between the Carnegie Museum of Art and The Studio Museum in Harlem. I went to this event last week, one of my favorite ongoing events:

Unblurred - August 4, 2017 | Penn Avenue

I'd venture a third of the participating galleries are minority-owned.

My daughter takes dance at The Alloy School of The Kelly Strayhorn Theater, a black dance theater.
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Old 08-09-2017, 07:45 PM
 
2,036 posts, read 1,029,337 times
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You know what's not cool? One person, telling another person, that because their city has too much of, or not enough of, whatever it might be, that it's not cool. It's amazing, how many experts there are, on a subject that is purely subjective.
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:05 PM
 
Location: Pittsburgh, PA (Morningside)
12,448 posts, read 11,955,665 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
This whole thread is all over the map. As you can see, "coolness" is subjective. One poster said, cities with a lot of tech bros/yuppies makes a place less cool. So I guess Seattle and Austin are uncool now.
Less cool than 20 years ago for sure. Too mainstream and popular now.

Quote:
Originally Posted by DTXman34 View Post
I'm still trying to figure out the coolness of Pittsburgh other than its history, some architectural gems, and surrounding scenery.
I wasn't specifically arguing that Pittsburgh was cool, only that it wasn't uncool. It completely ignores the great press the city has gotten over the last decade compared to its peers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by _OT View Post
See this is my point, that might be cool in Pittsburgh terms, but I don't see anywhere it includes or speaks for various demographics. The city is too busy trying to attract yuppies and hipsters; similar to cities like Portland and SLC in that link you posted...I find those cities to be "uncool."

Like I said before, I'm a very open-minded guy that likes to engulf in various cultures or demographics, but it's hard to do that in a city that doesn't embrace that.

For example, one is able to experience something like Speed Street and CIAA both in Charlotte; or being able to catch a function with a few paisas, or end up in an artistic neighborhood buying dreamcatchers or something in Dallas. I want to be able to experience or meet people from different cultures or demographics; whether it's someone who likes going to Music Festivals and eats at experimental restaurants, or someone one who likes going HBCU festivities and listens to SZA. I find that to be a cool experience.

Where is that in cities like Portland, SLC, or Pittsburgh?
IMHO a city like Dallas, or Charlotte isn't cool because the primary reason people move down there is to get a job or to flee winter. You don't see people with no serious job prospects crossing the country to move to those cities because they've heard it has an amazing local music scene or because they think it's the perfect place to locate their online business or whatever. Trendy areas are those places people move to for the cultural scene.

Now, can cool things happen there? Of course. But it's sort of incidental, because it's a big metro with lots of different kinds of people. But until a city has built that sort of buzz that it can attract migrants who come without a job offer or any real plans, it's not trendy, and thus not cool.
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:13 PM
 
Location: The middle of nowhere
9,114 posts, read 4,150,921 times
Reputation: 7747
Quote:
Originally Posted by eschaton View Post

IMHO a city like Dallas, or Charlotte isn't cool because the primary reason people move down there is to get a job or to flee winter. You don't see people with no serious job prospects crossing the country to move to those cities because they've heard it has an amazing local music scene or because they think it's the perfect place to locate their online business or whatever. Trendy areas are those places people move to for the cultural scene.

Now, can cool things happen there? Of course. But it's sort of incidental, because it's a big metro with lots of different kinds of people. But until a city has built that sort of buzz that it can attract migrants who come without a job offer or any real plans, it's not trendy, and thus not cool.
Great points. Those are the kind of places I would consider middle ground. Cool things happen in Dallas and Charlotte. They aren't Portland or Denver, but they are still desirable places to live with some "cool" amenities. They are also the kind of cities that people from smaller cities in the region move to if they want urban life. A lot of young people who grow up in Oklahoma City who want a more urban and progressive environment but aren't quite ready to make the leap to Denver or Austin will move to Dallas. Likewise people from places like Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg move to Charlotte.
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:19 PM
 
2,553 posts, read 1,648,555 times
Reputation: 2038
Memphis, St Louis, Kansas City, Oklahoma City
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:29 PM
 
Location: I is where I is
2,097 posts, read 1,531,659 times
Reputation: 2315
Quote:
Originally Posted by Enean View Post
You know what's not cool? One person, telling another person, that because their city has too much of, or not enough of, whatever it might be, that it's not cool. It's amazing, how many experts there are, on a subject that is purely subjective.
^^^ Boom goes the dynamite
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Old 08-09-2017, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,880 posts, read 3,002,451 times
Reputation: 3414
Quote:
Originally Posted by bawac34618 View Post
Great points. Those are the kind of places I would consider middle ground. Cool things happen in Dallas and Charlotte. They aren't Portland or Denver, but they are still desirable places to live with some "cool" amenities. They are also the kind of cities that people from smaller cities in the region move to if they want urban life. A lot of young people who grow up in Oklahoma City who want a more urban and progressive environment but aren't quite ready to make the leap to Denver or Austin will move to Dallas. Likewise people from places like Columbia and Greenville-Spartanburg move to Charlotte.
Good post. Dallas is right next to Oklahoma so I think naturally a lot of their transplants are from there. A lot of ou and OSU grads I would imagine.
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