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View Poll Results: Which cities will become popular for their affordability in the coming years?
Providence 6 8.22%
Albany 0 0%
Buffalo 3 4.11%
Richmond 14 19.18%
Greensboro 7 9.59%
Columbus OH 19 26.03%
Indianapolis 10 13.70%
Cincinnati 9 12.33%
St Louis 5 6.85%
Kansas City 8 10.96%
Milwaukee 3 4.11%
Oklahoma City 6 8.22%
Omaha 8 10.96%
Des Moines 6 8.22%
Birmingham 5 6.85%
Winston Salem 6 8.22%
Columbia SC 7 9.59%
Greenville-Spartanburg 14 19.18%
Knoxville 7 9.59%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 73. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 08-10-2017, 10:27 AM
 
56,612 posts, read 80,910,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pilot1 View Post
I would still focus on those cities in the South, and Sunbelt. Buffalo? Yeah right.
Yes, Buffalo and it is seeing a lot of development/construction right now. https://www.buffalorising.com/catego...o/development/

https://www.bizjournals.com/buffalo/...al-estate.html
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Old 08-10-2017, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,856 posts, read 2,984,533 times
Reputation: 3399
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Aguilar View Post
A lot of these are already booming and have been for a while, and are not cheap.

For example, there is nothing cheap about Denver.
I'm not sure Austin is that cheap either. Not sure about Phoenix.
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Old 08-10-2017, 12:49 PM
 
Location: East Side, Indianapolis
191 posts, read 169,425 times
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Austin is definitely not cheap, and Phoenix is not quite as expensive as it was during the mid-2000's mega-boom, but it's getting close.
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Old 08-10-2017, 08:38 PM
 
Location: "The Dirty Irv" Irving, TX
2,808 posts, read 1,303,535 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Simpsonvilllian View Post
Greenville is the center of the most populated county, MSA and CSA in South Carolina.

Texas is 14 hours or so away from Greenville so it isn't surprising a person in Texas had not heard about it. It isn't a big metro like Atlanta, a college town, state capital, or a tourist town, although the tourism has picked up since they built the massive pedestrian bridge right over the waterfall downtown back in 2006.

At least one of the local tv networks broadcasts Greenville's weather with Asheville and western NC's weather. Greenville is 1 hour 15 minutes south of Asheville. There are a lot of people who were planning to move to Asheville but decided to move to Greenville instead after checking it on the way to Asheville.

It has a lower cost of living than Asheville and a bigger job market.
I think It's really interesting how such a small city (under 70k) is head of such a Large MSA (bigger than OKC, Richmond among others)

I'm aware of Asheville and know several people who have gone there to visit.

From google maps the downtown looks very nice!

Obviously with that size of a MSA there are a significant number of jobs, but is the region doing anything to brand itself? It seems that all or most of the midsize or small metros that have experienced boom-town like growth are either College towns or State Capitals (Nashville, Austin, Indianapolis, Columbus, Raleigh, Boise, SLC, Portland, Maddison etc.)
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Old 08-10-2017, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Clemson, SC by way of Tyler,TX
4,856 posts, read 2,984,533 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I think It's really interesting how such a small city (under 70k) is head of such a Large MSA (bigger than OKC, Richmond among others)

I'm aware of Asheville and know several people who have gone there to visit.

From google maps the downtown looks very nice!

Obviously with that size of a MSA there are a significant number of jobs, but is the region doing anything to brand itself? It seems that all or most of the midsize or small metros that have experienced boom-town like growth are either College towns or State Capitals (Nashville, Austin, Indianapolis, Columbus, Raleigh, Boise, SLC, Portland, Maddison etc.)
Honestly, I want to visit it really bad, but the first I heard of Asheville was from this forum.
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Old 08-10-2017, 11:08 PM
 
Location: Arvada, CO
13,236 posts, read 24,424,164 times
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Originally Posted by Gaylord_Focker View Post
I'm not sure Austin is that cheap either. Not sure about Phoenix.
Phoenix *can* be cheap, especially the further from the city you get/and on the periphery, and especially if you just want a cracker box, condo, or trailer.

This is not the case in Denver. It doesn't get reasonably sane until Colorado Springs (80 miles south), and "cheap" until Pueblo.
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Old 08-10-2017, 11:21 PM
 
Location: 352
5,122 posts, read 3,884,064 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I think It's really interesting how such a small city (under 70k) is head of such a Large MSA (bigger than OKC, Richmond among others)

Obviously with that size of a MSA there are a significant number of jobs, but is the region doing anything to brand itself?
South Carolina's annexation laws make it much harder for cities to grow their boundaries. Greenville city in reality is pushing ~300,000 people. The county is over 500,000, and sprawl has spilled over into Spartanburg (300k) and Anderson Counties (pushing 200k).

The region does brand itself and apparently its working. Theres also a very strong international corporate precense in the area thanks to BMW and Michelin. Being on the I85 corridor is a huge asset.
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Old 08-11-2017, 01:30 PM
 
Location: Greenville SC 'Waterfall City'
7,583 posts, read 4,003,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Treasurevalley92 View Post
I think It's really interesting how such a small city (under 70k) is head of such a Large MSA (bigger than OKC, Richmond among others)

I'm aware of Asheville and know several people who have gone there to visit.

From google maps the downtown looks very nice!

Obviously with that size of a MSA there are a significant number of jobs, but is the region doing anything to brand itself? It seems that all or most of the midsize or small metros that have experienced boom-town like growth are either College towns or State Capitals (Nashville, Austin, Indianapolis, Columbus, Raleigh, Boise, SLC, Portland, Maddison etc.)
They generally brand it as an outdoorsy type of city. You can see the Blue Ridge mountains from various points in the city, plus there is a little mountain in town, Paris Mountain, that has a state park on the side of it.

There wasn't a park around the falls downtown until 2006. Prior to that, they used to have a road that went right over the falls and the falls were all but forgotten. The creation of Falls Park and the pedestrian bridge over it is what took Greenville's popularity to a new level. The National Trust for Historic Preservation awarded downtown Greenville the Great American Main Street Award in 2003, three years before the park opening.

I think of Gville as a more modern, urban version of Charlottesville without the large university. It does have a college town feel to it.

There is a small well regarded private university 5 miles or so north of downtown, Furman University, and it has what is considered one of the most beautiful campuses in the world with a small lake. The city has an urban path that you can bike from downtown out to Furman and a little town north of it called Travelers Rest. The path is called the Swamp Rabbit Trail.

Clemson University is 30 miles to the west, and it has moved its graduate business college to Main Street in Greenville within the past few years.

Last edited by ClemVegas; 08-11-2017 at 01:38 PM..
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